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Don Kleinschnitz
85 followers -
It "wouldn't dare not" .....
It "wouldn't dare not" .....

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+Martin Dillon
For some reason I could not reply to this post?

All the interlocks are in series and connected across your LPS enable which depends on what LPS you have? i.e P+/gnd, WP....
On the site you can find links to the original schematics if you want better quality images.
A complete protection wiring schema for a LPS with P+ is: P+, front cover, back cover, water flow switch, temp alarm, anything else that you want to shut off the laser if not working , gnd. The contacts of these devices are in series.

The current is small about 5-10 ma.

Relevant sections of the blog where there are links to the parts and detailed schematics:
http://donsthings.blogspot.com/2016/11/k40-s-interlock-breakout-board.html
http://donsthings.blogspot.com/2016/07/k40-k40-s-tips.html
Help. I don't like to ask newbie questions but that is what I am.
I joined the group about 1 month ago and received my k40 Monday. I want to make sure I do everything right and not make any stupid mistakes. Right now, I am looking at setting up the cooling and safety lockouts. I looked through the post topics but they are not sorted very well. I have been looking through http://donsthings.blogspot.com/ and there is a lot of useful stuff there but his interlock diagram didn't make since to me and was low resolution and hard to read. I read through the post on what type of water to use and plan on using distilled water and algaecide. I am having trouble finding the right flow meter/switch to use for my safety circuit.
Are all the switches just put into series, if so, how much current flows through the circuit? I also was not able to find where it hooks to the control board.

Feel free to add any advice you think I might need. I have read alot about laser alignment and downloaded some of the recommended guide and I don't think I will have problems with that.

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Archiving this fix....
Hello All,
pretty sad with my new K40 machine (labeled as K3020). I plugged power in and little explosion inside the PSU happened. Opened it and it was the fuse.

Disconnected everything (including the flyback) and only left the 2 AC wires + ground, changed fuse, did a new test and exploded the fuse again.

Desoldered the yellow box capacitor, desoldered the Flyback transistors, soldered a new fuse and it exploted...

The vendor said is going to send me a new PSU, but it's a bit frustrating not finding the problem... any idea?

Thanks in advance,

MA


Photo

1). Clamping table 2.0 design progress. Working on a tension mechanism and then plan to build one.
http://donsthings.blogspot.com/2017/02/k40-clamping-table.html

2). Thought I would try embedding Sketchup design in a G+ post

https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com/model/5f03acd4-1061-466e-aef7-cd10e8bd48f5/K40-Manual-Clamping-Table


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Hey guys - I thought I'd share this video. I'm doing rotary engraving on snare drum shells. I added a stepper to my wood lathe. It still needs some tweaking, but I am making progress. Thanks for this great community!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkuuG3GZesU

If anyone has a dead laser tube they are willing to give up for a good cause I am looking for one.
I want to do some experiments on water conductivity and will add this to the HV lab work.
I hope these tests will help us understand the what, why and how of water conductivity in the K40 so we can set parameters.
The laser optics do not need to work I just want to apply HV and test currents in the water.

I live in Utah so looking for one in the US.

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Interesting laser operations @ about 14:33.

Notice the beam split-er, open/adjustable head design

https://youtu.be/arviLCM6iB8

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Re-sharing in this forum
This post could legit be posted in many forums but I picked this one because LW4 really enables this kind of tinkering.

I won't disappoint you with a short post ....:)

...............BACKGROUND ............
I recently discovered that my K40-S has some type of horizontal "jiggle" problem and while musing about what is wrong, I also realized the need for good testing patterns. Patterns that would verify machine movement, marking accuracy and resolution.
You already know that I have an addiction to solving K40 problems vs actually using one.....
This jiggle problem ..... the solving of which creates another fascinating distraction that fits perfectly into my K40 obsession. That is, gain a better understanding of the design and performance limits of the K40, following with the science, engineering and tools to fix and improve. BTW: I am pretty sure my jiggle problem is loose belts but I have not fixed it yet because I want to verify these tools will diagnose this type of problem.

............. Whats this got to do with IT! ........
I decided to create a test pattern that would enable the simple but informative measurement of:
1. mechanical movement in x & y
2. optical resolution in x & y
3. proper controller operation and performance

I was further motivated by my observation that we do not have a good and visual way to verify a K40's total operation and performance after a conversion. We spend a lot of time in this forum trying to pinpoint problems. PWM is a classic case where machine-side power settings are confused with program side PWM settings.
Also motivating was the realization that to create this new tool I needed to gain pixel level knowledge of Inkscape/GIMP/LW4. One video from that adventure has already been posted.

OMG I needed to learn new tools to make new tools ....... NIRVANA!
..................
Stealing from my laser printer engineering background I did my first pattern design and experiment this weekend.
.................
The pattern tool basics are described as thus:
1. Designed in Inkscape at the pixel level with increasing line widths and spacing. Every line, every other line, 2 lines on/2 lines off, 3 lines on/3 lines off etc. Some vertical some horizontal all at 90 DPI. In aggregate this set of patterns should show all problems and maladjustment's .... I think.
2. The patterns are labeled so we can refer to them while online troubleshooting
3. Since the pattern is created as vectors it can be saved as both .svg and .jpg so that hybrid forms of the pattern can be created to test both vector and raster imaging. The same image can be vector drawn or laser scanned in the same job.
...............
Here is the cool part. LW4 allows you to load this file and then decide what, when and if a stroke/pattern/or raster is imaged. It will allow you to do this at the path level, meaning, you can set or change the marking order of each line on this test pattern. Also you can decide how much or how little of this pattern you mark for any given test. LW4 enables a test to position or duplicate this pattern anywhere in your defined work-space, useful to test perimeter effects of your optical alignment. Example: place of copy of this pattern in each corner of the work space.
Finally, after designing a test you can save your LW4 work-space to share or reuse. The test can also be saved and shared as g-code..... just awesome!
..............
Does this really work on a K40!

Turns out that I was "hangout trouble shooting" a machine this weekend with someone while designing this pattern and testing it on my laser printer. I sent it to him for marking on his machine enabling a real time, real world test of this schema.

BTW: we were trying to figure out why the scan lines on this machine were not closed. With this test pattern we eliminated all the usual suspects and concluded that a small tweak on spot size and power was needed.
.........

The picts in order of appearance:
A. the source test pattern in image form
B. actual test pattern printed on K40
C. close up showing vertical gaps (on long pattern to the left). Laser spot and power needed adjustment. Did you know that the power in a laser spot is not linearly distributed (that another story).
D. Measuring placement accuracy. Tested OK!
E. Test photo using my phone shooting through the objective lens on a calibrated loop... wow that worked! Control sample is from my canon laser printer. I used that to test my source file.

........
So, what do you think?

Z1. is this is a useful tool?
Z2. Any ideas on improvements
......

If there is enough interest I will document its use and publish a finished source. Otherwise I will use it for my own K40 entertainment :)


PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
3/20/17
5 Photos - View album

Post has attachment
This post could legit be posted in many forums but I picked this one because LW4 really enables this kind of tinkering.

I won't disappoint you with a short post ....:)

...............BACKGROUND ............
I recently discovered that my K40-S has some type of horizontal "jiggle" problem and while musing about what is wrong, I also realized the need for good testing patterns. Patterns that would verify machine movement, marking accuracy and resolution.
You already know that I have an addiction to solving K40 problems vs actually using one.....
This jiggle problem ..... the solving of which creates another fascinating distraction that fits perfectly into my K40 obsession. That is, gain a better understanding of the design and performance limits of the K40, following with the science, engineering and tools to fix and improve. BTW: I am pretty sure my jiggle problem is loose belts but I have not fixed it yet because I want to verify these tools will diagnose this type of problem.

............. Whats this got to do with IT! ........
I decided to create a test pattern that would enable the simple but informative measurement of:
1. mechanical movement in x & y
2. optical resolution in x & y
3. proper controller operation and performance

I was further motivated by my observation that we do not have a good and visual way to verify a K40's total operation and performance after a conversion. We spend a lot of time in this forum trying to pinpoint problems. PWM is a classic case where machine-side power settings are confused with program side PWM settings.
Also motivating was the realization that to create this new tool I needed to gain pixel level knowledge of Inkscape/GIMP/LW4. One video from that adventure has already been posted.

OMG I needed to learn new tools to make new tools ....... NIRVANA!
..................
Stealing from my laser printer engineering background I did my first pattern design and experiment this weekend.
.................
The pattern tool basics are described as thus:
1. Designed in Inkscape at the pixel level with increasing line widths and spacing. Every line, every other line, 2 lines on/2 lines off, 3 lines on/3 lines off etc. Some vertical some horizontal all at 90 DPI. In aggregate this set of patterns should show all problems and maladjustment's .... I think.
2. The patterns are labeled so we can refer to them while online troubleshooting
3. Since the pattern is created as vectors it can be saved as both .svg and .jpg so that hybrid forms of the pattern can be created to test both vector and raster imaging. The same image can be vector drawn or laser scanned in the same job.
...............
Here is the cool part. LW4 allows you to load this file and then decide what, when and if a stroke/pattern/or raster is imaged. It will allow you to do this at the path level, meaning, you can set or change the marking order of each line on this test pattern. Also you can decide how much or how little of this pattern you mark for any given test. LW4 enables a test to position or duplicate this pattern anywhere in your defined work-space, useful to test perimeter effects of your optical alignment. Example: place of copy of this pattern in each corner of the work space.
Finally, after designing a test you can save your LW4 work-space to share or reuse. The test can also be saved and shared as g-code..... just awesome!
..............
Does this really work on a K40!

Turns out that I was "hangout trouble shooting" a machine this weekend with someone while designing this pattern and testing it on my laser printer. I sent it to him for marking on his machine enabling a real time, real world test of this schema.

BTW: we were trying to figure out why the scan lines on this machine were not closed. With this test pattern we eliminated all the usual suspects and concluded that a small tweak on spot size and power was needed.
.........

The picts in order of appearance:
A. the source test pattern in image form
B. actual test pattern printed on K40
C. close up showing vertical gaps (on long pattern to the left). Laser spot and power needed adjustment. Did you know that the power in a laser spot is not linearly distributed (that another story).
D. Measuring placement accuracy. Tested OK!
E. Test photo using my phone shooting through the objective lens on a calibrated loop... wow that worked! Control sample is from my canon laser printer. I used that to test my source file.

........
So, what do you think?

Z1. is this is a useful tool?
Z2. Any ideas on improvements
......

If there is enough interest I will document its use and publish a finished source. Otherwise I will use it for my own K40 entertainment :)


PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
3/20/17
5 Photos - View album

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My wife works at the local hospital and they approached me the other day about making them some badges/buttons for their volunteers for National Health Care Volunteer week. This is the logo they wanted with a hand cupped under a heart. They also wanted the heart to be red and the hand to be blue. I've done painting on pieces posting etching, but for 100 pieces I wasn't too excited about the time it would take to do the precise painting, especially considering what their budget was. These are 2" (50mm) diameter pieces in 3mm alder wood.

I've also done painting pre etching but for one or two small items. For reverse etching pre painting is easier because you don't have to be overly precise on where the paint is placed as the excess get's lasered off. But you still need to be somewhat precise so you don't have paint overlapping where you don't want it. So the question became how to pre paint a 4x12" board for doing 10 button's at a time.

What I decided to do is to created a rough outline of the individual details to be painted and do a quick and very light vector etch of the outlines (60mm/s at 13%). Then I painted the outlined areas with a small flat brush and didn't worry with staying in the lines to much, so it was quick. After the paint dried I masked, etched and cut. Appears to work really well. The most critical factor is that the outline etch needs to VERY light as the depth of the etch will get transferred during the engraving etch. The last picture shows my first attempt where I did the outline etch at 40mm/s with 15% power and the pre etch is clearly visible. On subsequent tests I also smoothed out and tightened up the outline etch a bit to make it even less likely to be noticeable. Hopefully I will be able to maintain good positioning on replacing the board post painting, especially for the pieces toward the other end of the board. Even If the alignment is off just a bit it would just mean having to touch up a few of them which is still better than painting the whole thing post etching.
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
3/16/17
6 Photos - View album

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I spent time this week getting up to speed on using inkscape as a design source for Laserweb 4 operations.
After collaborating with a few others doing the same thing I created a short video to share my learning, hope it is accurate and useful to others.

I am new to both LW and Inkscape :)

https://youtu.be/PylIwah4jPs
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