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It's amazing that someone would step up, say they worked for a wage and then admit they screwed the employer and customers at every turn. Not only that, they stood by and let others do the same thing with no consequences, thereby widening the scope of the behavior and multiplying its effect. Why would you admit that you're a dishonest, unreliable and disreputable person, and a liability and drain to any company that hires you? What benefit from life does this person expect as a result of his actions and inactions, and what future does he expect from his revelations? The writer might try to explain it by liquor, "young guns" and the title of Genius. But not so fast. Everyone still has some measure of self-respect and values, and which are not redeemable for alcohol and title. This story has so little to do with Apple, and so much to do about individual accountability. While Apple certainly deserves some discredit for allowing this behavior through mis-management and mis-supervision, the "corruption" that Gizmodo mentions, and the resulting blame, rests squarely on the shoulders of the employees. What did Kurt Cobain say? "The duty of youth is to challenge corruption."
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I worked in Apple retail for a year from 2009 to 2010, and absolutely none of this rings true for the store at which I worked.
I agree with most of what you said Gary. These guys in the article are awful people and awful employees. Apple should have had better controls though and more oversight. Even today, visiting a Genius Bar seems sometimes like a game. A luck of the draw. If you get the right Genius, you get what you need. Otherwise you often lose.

Word on the street is that this story came from the NorthPark Center store in Dallas. Sadly, this is the store I usually go to and have had numerous bad experiences at, although to be fair, most of those incidents did not involve the Genius Bar.
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