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rasha kamel
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"Scientists have identified chemosensory proteins (CSPs) that play important roles in communications between worker ants. CSPs may represent a starting point for elucidation of the molecular mechanisms involved in the sophisticated system of communication that supports ants' complex societies, and the evolution of these mechanisms".
Scientists have identified chemosensory proteins (CSPs) that play important roles in communications between worker ants. CSPs may represent a starting point for elucidation of the molecular mechanisms involved in the sophisticated system of communication that supports ants' complex societies, and the evolution of these mechanisms.
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"Researchers are turning to an unusual source -- otoliths, the inner ear bones of fish -- to identify the nursery grounds of winter flounder, the protected estuaries where the potato chip-sized juveniles grow to adolescence. The research could aid the effort to restore plummeting winter flounder populations along the East Coast of the US".
Researchers are turning to an unusual source -- otoliths, the inner ear bones of fish -- to identify the nursery grounds of winter flounder, the protected estuaries where the potato chip-sized juveniles grow to adolescence. The research could aid the effort to restore plummeting winter flounder populations along the East Coast of the US.
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"The team surveyed cases of green turtle fibropapillomatosis disease, which creates unsightly pink tumors on the turtles' flesh. Although benign, they can impede turtles' vision and movement, as well as feeding, swimming and organ function. The virus is not thought to be dangerous to humans. Over two years, around 13 percent of green turtles found in waters had the disease. In contrast, fishermen did not land any diseased turtles during this period, even though they were fishing in areas where diseased animals were prevalent".
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"Crown of thorns starfish don't just sniff out coral — they look for it too.
That thankfully short-lived tone is the sound of a crown of thorns starfish seeing a bright light. It's not squealing from the glare, that's the electrical signal generated by photoreceptors in one of its eyes.
Eyes? Yep. Starfish have got eyes — one on the tip of every arm. Like compound eyes in insects they're light sensitive, but don't have any lenses.
Apparently scientists have known about the eyes for a couple of hundred years. But it was only very recently discovered that they can use their eyes to find their way around.
"Everybody thought starfish only used smell for orientation", says researcher Dr Ronald Petie from the University of Copenhagen.
"But now we know this is not true for the crown of thorns starfish and one more species," says Petie.
Normally the crown of thorns starfish walk straight towards a reef, but with their eyes removed, Petie found they walked in random directions.
"This shows that vision and not smell is the cue they use for detecting reefs at short distance," he says.
To find out what colour light the starfish were most sensitive to, he used microelectrodes to measure the electrical response of neurons in the eye to different colours of light. (It's that signal converted to an audible tone that you can hear above).
Not surprisingly for a reef-based creature, the crown of thorns was most sensitive to blue light, so the coral boulders they feed on would appear as a dark patch on a bright background.
Petie is currently on Lizard Island testing the animals' response to colour in the wild.
"I've done experiments where I attracted animals to a black sheet in the middle of a sand flat and got animals to walk away from a reef when I covered it with a white sheet".
Before this work, and earlier work on the blue star by his colleague Anders Garm, it was thought that starfish vision was limited to phototaxis — allowing them to move towards or away from light".
Crown of thorns starfish don't just sniff out coral - they look for it too.
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"New research predicts that Earth has more than 1,500 undiscovered minerals and that the exact mineral diversity of our planet is unique and could not be duplicated anywhere in the cosmos".
New research predicts that Earth has more than 1,500 undiscovered minerals and that the exact mineral diversity of our planet is unique and could not be duplicated anywhere in the cosmos.
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That's phenomal if accurate, heck if even a little accurate!
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"An American coral reef scientist found a small shrimp-like crustacean with a greatly enlarged appendage reminiscent of the Elton John character in the movie 'Tommy.' Discovered while working in the remote coral reefs of Raja Ampat, Indonesia, Dr. Thomas said about the species: 'When I first saw this amazing amphipod I immediately thought of Elton John as the Pinball Wizard in the movie".
An American coral reef scientist found a small shrimp-like crustacean with a greatly enlarged appendage reminiscent of the Elton John character in the movie 'Tommy.' Discovered while working in the remote coral reefs of Raja Ampat, Indonesia, Dr. Thomas said about the species: 'When I first saw this amazing amphipod I immediately thought of Elton John as the Pinball Wizard in the movie.'
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rasha kamel

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"Although flightless in air, penguins have a number of adaptations which allow them glide effortlessly through the water. And some of these adaptations are in an unlikely part of their anatomy -- their brains. Recent finds of fossil penguins from 35-million-year-old sediments in Antarctica have begun to shed light on the changes in penguin brains that accompanied their transition to water".
Although flightless in air, penguins have a number of adaptations which allow them glide effortlessly through the water. And some of these adaptations are in an unlikely part of their anatomy -- their brains. Recent finds of fossil penguins from 35-million-year-old sediments in Antarctica have begun to shed light on the changes in penguin brains that accompanied their transition to water.
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"Collisions with wind turbines kill about 100 golden eagles a year in some locations, but a new study that maps both potential wind-power sites and nesting patterns of the birds reveals sweet spots, where potential for wind power is greatest with a lower threat to nesting eagles".
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Evidence suggests subatomic particles could defy the standard model
The Standard Model of particle physics, which explains most of the known behaviors and interactions of fundamental subatomic particles, has held up remarkably well over several decades. This far-reaching theory does have a few shortcomings, however—most notably that it doesn't account for gravity. In hopes of revealing new, non-standard particles and forces, physicists have been on the hunt for conditions and behaviors that directly violate the S...
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"An invasive caterpillar that feeds on hedges is starting to spread from its established base in London across the UK, experts warn.
The box tree caterpillar is the larval stage of a moth native to the Far East and India.
An infestation can reduce the glossy green leaves of a box hedge to a faded skeleton within a few days of hatching.
The Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) says it is now receiving three or four reports of infestations a day.
There have been more than 150 reports already this year, compared with 20 last year, and just three in 2011.
Initially limited to a small area of south west London, there have now been reports of the box tree caterpillar (Diaphania perspectalis) in areas outside the M25 and in Essex.
Dr Hayley Jones, an entomologist with the RHS, said: "The key thing is that it is established - it has survived throughout the winter and is breeding. It has a foot in the door and is now building up in numbers."
The moth first became established in Europe in 2007 and was first reported in the UK in 2008. By the end of 2014 it became apparent that it had established itself in some parts of London.
Experts believe that it originated in China and either flew across the English Channel or stowed away in containers of imported plants".
An invasive caterpillar that feeds on hedges is starting to spread from its established base in London across the UK.
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"Granada, Spain's climate and layout is like that of many cities in the Mediterranean area, which has the highest occurrence of pollen allergies in the world. The researchers hope their efforts will lead to fantastic urban green spaces that don't cause allergic reactions for 30 percent of the city's population".
Granada, Spain's climate and layout is like that of many cities in the Mediterranean area, which has the highest occurrence of pollen allergies in the world. The researchers hope their efforts will lead to fantastic urban green spaces that don't cause allergic reactions for 30 percent of the city's population.
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People from the west destroy it better ...
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"Physicists have found a radical new way confine electromagnetic energy without it leaking away, akin to throwing a pebble into a pond with no splash.The theory could have broad ranging applications from explaining dark matter to combating energy losses in future technologies".
Physicists have found a radical new way confine electromagnetic energy without it leaking away, akin to throwing a pebble into a pond with no splash.The theory could have broad ranging applications from explaining dark matter to combating energy losses in future technologies.
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Have her in circles
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Introduction
I had PhD in computational chemistry
I am working in archaeological analysis
I am interesting in geology, material science
and environmental sciences

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