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rasha kamel
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"A previously unknown species of insect living has been discovered living within reach of Australian suburbia. A researcher investigated the insect responsible for bush coconuts in South East Queensland, stating that until recently there were only two known species of the insect Cystococcus that lived inside these galls".
A previously unknown species of insect living has been discovered living within reach of Australian suburbia. A researcher investigated the insect responsible for bush coconuts in South East Queensland, stating that until recently there were only two known species of the insect Cystococcus that lived inside these galls.
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"If you haven't heard of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, thank geography, NGOs, and government agencies like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization (WHO) for keeping the new disease in check. In camels, which act as a reservoir for the causative coronavirus, the illness causes a runny nose; in humans, it causes a cough, fever, and, in 36 percent of cases, death, according to the WHO".
If you haven't heard of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, thank geography, NGOs, and government agencies like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization (WHO) for keeping the new disease in check. In camels, which act as a reservoir for the causative coronavirus, the illness causes a runny nose; in humans, it causes a cough, fever, and, in 36 percent of cases, death, according to the WHO.
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"A logging company has agreed to begin dismantling abandoned logging roads currently being used by poachers to access prime Amur (Siberian) tiger habitat in the Russian Far East".
A logging company has agreed to begin dismantling abandoned logging roads currently being used by poachers to access prime Amur (Siberian) tiger habitat in the Russian Far East.
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"The Tyrannosaurus rex and its fellow theropod dinosaurs that rampage across the screen in movies like Jurassic World were successful predators partly due to a unique, deeply serrated tooth structure that allowed them to easily tear through the flesh and bone of other dinosaurs, says new research".
The Tyrannosaurus rex and its fellow theropod dinosaurs that rampage across the screen in movies like Jurassic World were successful predators partly due to a unique, deeply serrated tooth structure that allowed them to easily tear through the flesh and bone of other dinosaurs, says new research.
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"City folk have a reputation for being less friendly than their rural counterparts, and the same appears to be true for garden birds. Urban song sparrows (Melospiza melodia, pictured) are more aggressive toward their neighbors than are sparrows out in the country, researchers report this month in Behavioral Ecology. But whereras the temperament of human city-dwellers is often attributed to the sheer density of people, this isn’t the case for sparrows. The team measured birds’ responses to recordings of another male’s song, noting how often males approached or attacked the speakers, and found that aggression depended not on the density of sparrows, but on the availability of food in the environment. Counterintuitively, male sparrows responded more aggressively in the city, where there tends to be more food, and rural birds became more aggressive when provided with food supplements. The authors explain that the sparrows defend food-rich, high-quality territories more aggressively, but it isn’t clear whether this is an offensive or a defensive strategy; city birds may be more aggressive because a territory with more food is more valuable to them, or because their abundant resources attract more thieves". 
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4 new species of torrent-frogs have been identified from West Africa!

Four new species of tooth-frog have been identified in West Africa, over 100 years after initially being identified as one single species Odontobatrachus natator.

Tooth-frogs are named so because of their unique jawbones that have tusk-like appendages on the lower jaw and curved upper teeth.

O. natator was discovered in 1905 and because the frogs were identical, they were all assigned to this one species.

However, Michael F Barej and his colleagues suggested the existence of a complex of cryptic species (that are structurally identical) and using morphological analyses on more than 150 adult specimens, scientists found an unexpectedly high molecular variation.

Published in the journal Zoosystematics And Evolution, the scientists from the Museum für Naturkunde in Berlin found there to be at least five species belonging to the Odontobatrachus genus – four of which are new to science.

All are considered highly endangered because of their small distribution ranges and habitat loss in the Upper Guinean biodiversity hot spot.

The descriptions of the new species are based on combinative analysis of genetics and the morphological characters.

The four new species are named as followed:
Odontobatrachus arndti, O. fouta, O. smithi and O. ziama
Odontobatrachus natator found to be five separate species of tooth frog.
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"A model to help land managers protect the threatened piping plover, a tiny shorebird, against habitat damage and predation has been created by a scientist. The bird's neighborhood preference has resulted in this once common shorebird being on the federal threatened species list since 1986".

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/07/150728092400.htm
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"Researchers have found they can get a good idea of a grizzly bear's diet over several months by looking at a single hair. The technique, which measures residues of trace metals, can be a major tool in determining if the threatened animals are getting enough of the right foods to eat".
Researchers have found they can get a good idea of a grizzly bear's diet over several months by looking at a single hair. The technique, which measures residues of trace metals, can be a major tool in determining if the threatened animals are getting enough of the right foods to eat.
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"The discovery of a previously unknown type of metal deformation -- sinuous flow -- and a method to suppress it could lead to more efficient machining and other manufacturing advances by reducing the force and energy required to process metals".
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"At the end of the Pleistocene period, approximately 12,800 years ago­ — give or take a few centuries — a cosmic impact triggered an abrupt cooling episode that earth scientists refer to as the Younger Dryas. New research has narrowed the date to a 100-year range, sometime between 12,835 and 12,735 years ago".
At the end of the Pleistocene period, approximately 12,800 years ago­ — give or take a few centuries — a cosmic impact triggered an abrupt cooling episode that earth scientists refer to as the Younger Dryas. New research has narrowed the date to a 100-year range, sometime between 12,835 and 12,735 years ago.
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"The light-sensing molecules that tell plants whether to germinate, when to flower and which direction to grow to seek more sunlight were inherited millions of years ago from ancient algae, finds a new study. The findings are some of the strongest evidence yet against the prevailing idea that the ancestors of early plants got the red light sensors that helped them move from water to land by engulfing bacteria, the researchers say".
The light-sensing molecules that tell plants whether to germinate, when to flower and which direction to grow to seek more sunlight were inherited millions of years ago from ancient algae, finds a new study. The findings are some of the strongest evidence yet against the prevailing idea that the ancestors of early plants got the red light sensors that helped them move from water to land by engulfing bacteria, the researchers say.
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"A community of lizards from the Caribbean, preserved for 20 million years in amber, have been found to be identical to their modern cousins, say researchers.
This suggests the different niches inhabited by the lizards have - incredibly - changed little over the past 20 million-year, report the team, in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
"These fossils were really surprising because of how much detail they contained, allowing us to see how these lizards would have looked in real life," says the study's lead author Dr Emma Sherratt of the University of New England in Australia.
Sherratt says amber fossils are usually just a hollow impression, but the new fossils of anolis lizards from the island of Hispaniola, provide phenomenal detail - including the colour of the lizard, what it was last doing, and whether its eyes were open or shut.
"Most of ours had full skeletons, and details of the skin were impressed on the amber, providing very detailed images of tiny scales on the body and on the sticky toe pads," she adds.
"You could have taken a lizard today, embedded it resin and it would have looked like one of these creatures. That's how realistic and modern they look."
Another impressive aspect to the study is the large number of amber fossils analysed.
While previous research has mostly looked at individual specimens, this study involved 38 lizards fossils from various locations on Hispaniola.
Obtain from museums and private collections - one was even a pendant in a necklace - the community of fossils represent the largest group of vertebrates encased in amber.
"Nothing like this has ever been described before," says Sherratt".
A community of lizards from the Caribbean, preserved for 20 million years in amber, have been found to be identical to their modern cousins, say researchers.
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Introduction
I had PhD in computational chemistry
I am working in archaeological analysis
I am interesting in geology, material science
and environmental sciences

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Female