Profile

Cover photo
rasha kamel
17,821 followers|4,847,531 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

rasha kamel

Shared publicly  - 
 
"British stoats suffered a dramatic loss in genetic diversity in the 20th century but extinct British genes were preserved in the stoat population of New Zealand, a new study has found. The research reveals that stoats, which were introduced to New Zealand, have greater genetic diversity there, than in their native Britain. The results are unusual because introducing a species to a new area is usually associated with a loss in its genetic diversity".
British stoats suffered a dramatic loss in genetic diversity in the 20th century but extinct British genes were preserved in the stoat population of New Zealand, a new study has found. The research reveals that stoats, which were introduced to New Zealand, have greater genetic diversity there, than in their native Britain. The results are unusual because introducing a species to a new area is usually associated with a loss in its genetic diversit...
5
1
Charlie Richmond's profile photo
Add a comment...

rasha kamel

Shared publicly  - 
 
"Researchers have developed a large-scale sequencing technique called Genome and Transcriptome Sequencing (G&T-seq) that reveals, simultaneously, the unique genome sequence of a single cell and the activity of genes within that single cell".
5
2
Charlie Ebert's profile photoCharlie Richmond's profile photo
Add a comment...
 
"Astrophysicists have created a 3-D map of the universe that spans nearly two billion light years and is the most complete picture of our cosmic neighborhood to date".
Astrophysicists have created a 3-D map of the universe that spans nearly two billion light years and is the most complete picture of our cosmic neighborhood to date.
11
3
Davor Maksimović's profile photoCharlie Ebert's profile photoGnotic Pasta's profile photoCharlie Richmond's profile photo
2 comments
 
Wow!
Add a comment...

rasha kamel

Shared publicly  - 
 
"Teasing out how slow, silent earthquakes respond to tidal forces lets researchers calculate the friction inside the fault, which could help understand when and how the more hazardous earthquakes occur".
Teasing out how slow, silent earthquakes respond to tidal forces lets researchers calculate the friction inside the fault, which could help understand when and how the more hazardous earthquakes occur.
4
1
Charlie Richmond's profile photo
Add a comment...

rasha kamel

Shared publicly  - 
 
"Automatic cameras in the Ukrainian side of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone have provided an insight into the previously unseen secret lives of wildlife that have made the contaminated landscape their home.
Throughout 2015, the cameras will be positioned at 84 locations, allowing a team of scientists to record the type of animals passing through the area and where they make their home.
In the first four months since the cameras were deployed, the team has "trapped" more than 10,000 images of animals, suggesting the 30km zone, established shortly after the April 1986 disaster when a nuclear reactor exploded, ejecting radioactive material across the surrounding terrain and high into the atmosphere, is now home to a rich diversity of wildlife".
Scientists' camera traps offer a snapshot into the secret lives of wildlife inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.
7
4
Fox Mulder's profile photoCharlie Richmond's profile photo
Add a comment...
 
"Nepal's devastating magnitude-7.8 earthquake on Saturday was primed over 80 years ago by its last massive earthquake in 1934, which razed around a quarter of Kathmandu to the ground and killed over 17,000 people.
This latest quake follows the same pattern as a duo of big tremors that occurred over 700 years ago, and results from a domino effect of strain transferring along the fault, geologists say.
The researchers discovered the likely existence of this doublet effect only in recent weeks, during field work in the region.
Saturday's quake, which struck an area in central Nepal, between the capital Kathmandu and the city of Pokhara, has had a far-reaching impact.
Early reports indicate that more than 2,000 people have lost their lives, with victims in Bangladesh, India, Tibet, and on Mount Everest, where avalanches were triggered.
Death tolls and casualty figures are likely to rise over the coming days, and the risk of landslides on slopes made unstable by the quake mean that the danger is far from passed".
Nepal's devastating magnitude-7.8 earthquake on Saturday was primed over 80 years ago by its last massive earthquake in 1934, geologists working in the region say.
8
2
Mohamed Shariff's profile photogloumarie Diaz's profile photoCharlie Richmond's profile photo
 
Nepal pupils godishelpipray
Add a comment...
Have her in circles
17,821 people
donshua robinson's profile photo
Daryl Scott (The Dangerous One)'s profile photo
Stig Norland's profile photo
elias moh's profile photo
HG Schlüter's profile photo
董小栋's profile photo
Emir Şevkioğlu's profile photo
Isaac Clerencia's profile photo
Miel Bronneberg-Rijnders's profile photo

rasha kamel

Shared publicly  - 
 
"Researchers have shown that, like humans, mustached bats use the left and right sides of their brains to process different aspects of sounds. Aside from humans, no other animal that has been studied, not even monkeys or apes, has proved to use such hemispheric specialization for sound processing -- meaning that the left brain is better at processing fast sounds, and the right processing slow ones".
Researchers have shown that, like humans, mustached bats use the left and right sides of their brains to process different aspects of sounds. Aside from humans, no other animal that has been studied, not even monkeys or apes, has proved to use such hemispheric specialization for sound processing -- meaning that the left brain is better at processing fast sounds, and the right processing slow ones.
2
1
Charlie Richmond's profile photo
Add a comment...
 
"Although closely related to the notorious carnivore Tyrannosaurus rex, a new lineage of dinosaur discovered in Chile is proving to be an evolutionary jigsaw puzzle, as it preferred to graze upon plants. Chilesaurus boasted a proportionally small skull, hands with two fingers like Tyrannosaurus rex and feet more akin to primitive long-neck dinosaurs".
Although closely related to the notorious carnivore Tyrannosaurus rex, a new lineage of dinosaur discovered in Chile is proving to be an evolutionary jigsaw puzzle, as it preferred to graze upon plants. Chilesaurus boasted a proportionally small skull, hands with two fingers like Tyrannosaurus rex and feet more akin to primitive long-neck dinosaurs.
4
1
Charlie Richmond's profile photo
Add a comment...

rasha kamel

Shared publicly  - 
 
"The monk parakeets that have invaded Europe and North America over the last 40-50 years fortifying their massive communal nests atop utility poles in many urban areas appear to have originated from the same small area in South America, according to a new study".
The monk parakeets that have invaded Europe and North America over the last 40-50 years fortifying their massive communal nests atop utility poles in many urban areas appear to have originated from the same small area in South America, according to a new study.
4
1
Charlie Richmond's profile photo
Add a comment...

rasha kamel

Shared publicly  - 
 
"Gardeners know what not to do when pruning crape myrtles, but the frequent reminders against crape murder can leave some gardeners wondering if it's possible to prune these plants at all".
Gardeners know what not to do when pruning crape myrtles, but the frequent reminders against crape murder can leave some gardeners wondering if it's possible to prune these plants at all.
4
2
Chase Barnes's profile photoCharlie Richmond's profile photo
Add a comment...
 
"Despite Benjamin Franklin's best efforts with a kite and a key, the phenomenon of lightning remains a scientific enigma. Now, researchers have developed a new tool that could help them solve some of lightning’s mysteries. By using cosmic rays, space-traveling particles that constantly rain down on our atmosphere, scientists report they can peek inside thunderstorms and measure their electric fields, helping them pinpoint the conditions that cause storms' electrical outbursts. The advance could help researchers predict more precisely when and where lightning is most likely to strike and get people out of harm's way in time.
Lightning is so poorly understood in part because measuring electric fields inside thunderstorms is challenging. Scientists have made measurements by sending balloons or small rockets into the clouds, but such probes can alter the electrical environment, potentially obscuring the natural activity they’re trying to measure. But such measurements fail to explain lightning's origin, as they have yet to find fields strong enough to initiate lightning. It could be that the high field regions are very localized, or it could mean another factor is necessary to set off the light show".
Scientists develop new technique to probe electric fields inside thunderstorms
7
5
Charlie Richmond's profile photoCharlie Ebert's profile photoKristin Gleitsman's profile photoZachary Hardy's profile photo
2 comments
 
Like a charge in a spark plug arcs across the gap, I think it is a negative "leader" that reaches upward far enough for a connection to be made, at which time the positive from the cloud arcs to the ground.
The leader(s) can be seen in high speed filming, that is dim compared to the discharge. One or more can be seen reaching upward toward the branching lightning, the closest will connect and boom - a strike.
Add a comment...
People
Have her in circles
17,821 people
donshua robinson's profile photo
Daryl Scott (The Dangerous One)'s profile photo
Stig Norland's profile photo
elias moh's profile photo
HG Schlüter's profile photo
董小栋's profile photo
Emir Şevkioğlu's profile photo
Isaac Clerencia's profile photo
Miel Bronneberg-Rijnders's profile photo
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Story
Introduction
I had PhD in computational chemistry
I am working in archaeological analysis
I am interesting in geology, material science
and environmental sciences