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Ivo Perelman
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“Perelman has upended the sense of “extraordinary” by regularly, even expectedly, succeeding at what seems impossible... Ivo’s almost supernal ability to commune with his collaborators, via the purest elution of musical elements, is certainly extraordinary.But those who have followed his extensively documented music (closing in on close to 100 recordings under his own name) accept this as par for the course.”
Neil Tesser, liner notes “Kindred Spirits”
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“two hours of searching music...No hesitation. No redundancy. No preconception. Pure exploration and inspiration.”

The telepathic articulation between tenor saxophonist Ivo Perelman and pianist Matthew Shipp, two free spirits in the art of music-making, is quite obvious and grows stronger on Oneness, a triple album with 33 improvised tracks, which all together, offer more than two hours of searching music. In this sonic adventure, the interactions never feel a debate, but rather a well-reasoned conversation. The nature of the pieces often become visual, stimulating our imagination for mysterious interplanetary routes or energizing earthy expressions defined by an organic blend of avant-garde jazz, art-folk elements, and contemporary classical incursions.

The duo always finds new ways to surprise, reinventing lines and textures through spontaneous ideas. They not only have a staggering control of their instruments but also find an easy comfort with each other's craft and forms of expression.

The first tune of CD1 suggests an odd tango-ish mood until falling into a free ramble, in which Perelman’s sinuous moves exalted by deep-toned notes with a rich vibrato. In a variety of atmospheres along the way, the cohesion of the duo is felt through free-form approaches and effortless suppression of time while shaping, sometimes angular, sometimes curved geometric figures with an inner pulse of creativity. The timbral range is also a crucial factor in their aesthetic reality, with Shipp’s off-center chordal adventurism, always intricate and stunning, becoming a great vehicle for Perelman’s elliptical threads and asymmetrical zigzags. Ambiguity is also brought into their subliminal interplay, no matter which direction they decide to take - it may be tranquil, lyric and dreamlike but also tense, restless and provocative.

The extemporizations sometimes hinge on an initial idea or just flow briskly with refractory intervallic leaps and opportune chromaticism. No hesitation. No redundancy. No preconception. Pure exploration and inspiration.

The album reflects what these longtime collaborators and wonderful musicians can do. One saxophone, one piano, and oneness of mind and purpose are everything they need.

Filipe Freitas
http://jazztrail.net/blog/
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“the sounds blend together so beautifully - a rare piece of chemistry full of introspective, almost spiritual moments”

A month and a half later, Perelman and Shipp play in Baltimore, together with drummer Jeff Cosgrove. The second set is recorded there and sets the tone of this series. Perelman: "With every new batch of recordings, I always try to focus on some different methodology, so I derive more learning in each batch. And what I learned here is: what a difference a drummer makes." There are four musicians on these six albums. Besides Cosgrove, there’s Joe Hertenstein, Bobby Kapp and Gerald Cleaver. Cosgrove and Perelman met through Shipp and since this concert is their first performance as a trio you would not think so but the sounds blend together so beautifully - a rare piece of chemistry full of introspective, almost spiritual moments. Matt Shipp, especially, sounds very different here than what we’re used to.

https://draaiomjeoren.blogspot.nl/2018/05/cds-ivo-perelman-matthew-shipp-live-in.html?m=1
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“you get the feeling Ivo is in deep conversation with his tenor sax. His sound, in terms of timbre and phrasing, resembles the human voice more than usual..as always, he is almost unparalleled. Endlessly complex, colorful phrases are strung together, which at times follow one another logically, but more often than not create fascinating contrasts. Pianist Matt Shipp is equal to the task, but his style is more angular, more epic, though his solo in the seventh minute of 'Set 1, Part 1' is as lyrical as ever.”

The dedication to Ivo Perelman by Leo Feigin, the man behind Leo Records, seems boundless. Besides the six-part 'The Art of the Improv Trio' in 2016, and 'The Art of Perelman-Shipp', a series of seven CDs from early 2017, six more CDs of this saxophonist's work appeared at the end of last year which included various compositions, all recorded during May and June of 2017. It‘s almost a sequel to 'The Art of Perelman-Shipp', as Matthew Shipp can be heard on five of the six albums, with 'Octagon' being the only exception. Ivo Perelman/Matthew Shipp/Jeff Cossgrove - 'Live in Baltimore'. Let's start live, closer to home. The date is May 21, 2017, the place: L'Archiduc, Brussels. Perelman and Shipp are on stage. The improv set is divided into two CDs and consists only of spontaneous compositions. The two begin immediately, instantly recognizable in their approach. Saxophonist Perelman, as always, is almost unparalleled. Endlessly complex, colorful phrases are strung together, which at times follow one another logically, but more often than not create fascinating contrasts. Pianist Shipp is equal to the task, but his style is more angular, more epic, though his solo in the seventh minute of 'Set 1, Part 1' is as lyrical as ever.

As always, with Perelman you get the feeling he’s in deep conversation with his tenor sax. His sound, in terms of timbre and phrasing, resembles the human voice more than usual. A day earlier the two were at the Bimhuis, recordings that can still be listened to at Bimhuis Radio. At the time we remarked: “Even more than on the albums, it is striking how incredibly well those two are in sync. Looking at each other is apparently no longer necessary, just going with the emotion is sufficient.” It also applies to this concert. There are several moments that you can hardly believe that it’s improvised. As an example: 'Set 1, Part 2', around the 16th minute. Together they take subtle vignettes and string them together into an eloquent necklace.

https://draaiomjeoren.blogspot.nl/2018/05/cds-ivo-perelman-matthew-shipp-live-in.html?m=1
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“IVO PERELMAN,the trailblazing genius is back playing with the man that knows him best, US pianist, MATTHEW SHIPP..It’s
a supernal collection that demonstrates the duo’s symbiotic musical interplay”

It doesn’t seem five minutes since the super- prolific Brazilian free jazz saxophonist, IVO PERELMAN, unleashed seven albums in one go. That was in 2017 and now the trailblazing genius is back playing with the man that knows him best, US pianist, MATTHEW SHIPP. Never one to do things by halves, Oneness (HHHH Leo) turns out to be a triple album
of straight-to-tape improv recorded in five days. It’s
a supernal collection that demonstrates the duo’s symbiotic musical interplay but sadly, according, to Perelman, it could be their last record together. Let’s hope not.

http://recordcollectormag.com/
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“Oneness is the culmination of what Ivo and I have been working on for years. The duo is the central project for us—and we feed off each other’s energy and intellect and spirit. It is a project we both take very seriously.”
Matthew Shipp , Downbeat interview

http://downbeat.com/news/detail/qa-with-matthew-shipp
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"This 3-CD set of sax/piano improvisations explores the uncanny mind-meld of two artists who are tight enough to finish each other's sentences, musically speaking. Both as a duo as well as in trios, quartets, and quintets, Ivo Perelman and Matt Shipp have been collaborating for decades and refined a kind of sonic telepathy over time that is totally captivating to these ears. Recorded over five consecutive days during sessions initially intended to produce a single, creme-de-la-creme disc, this sprawling collection is like a big ol' box of bonbons filled with kerosene. All tracks are recommended for fans of fiery, intimate sax/piano-duo jazz improv."
Ernesto Yermoli https://www.ashevillefm.org/show/something-else/
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“a world in which fantasy and imagination reign supreme...a project without equals in contemporary jazz.”

The collaboration between the Brazilian tenor saxophonist Ivo Perelman and the African-American pianist Matthew Shipp, who at the time formed a trio with bass player William Parker, began in 1996 with the Cama da terra album for Homestead. What seemed to be an extemporaneous collaboration, as often happens with improvised music that lives in the moment, arising from the feeling that is born in the concrete situation in the studio or live, has lasted until now in various forms. As a duo they have already given us a series of exciting albums before this new triple whose music was recorded in the studio to make a CD. Upon listening to the tapes, we realized the high degree of empathy achieved by the two of them and the impossibility of extracting only a single from it given the high quality and emotionality of what had been recorded. Three CDs emerged, all published together, which bear witness to the identity of this duo, now immediately recognizable for the sound, which is also unique for how it is able to put together many sound possibilities while remaining itself. This is not only a duo which improvises or does freeform music: here we are dealing with emotions, ideas at the service of a project without equals in contemporary jazz. We go from more peaceful moments, such as for example Part 4 of the first disc in which the listener's attention is constantly requested, to others in which the saxophone engages in dialogue with unusual sounds, such as the second disc, thanks to Perelman's control of the high notes on the instrument. Here, in Part 10, the Brazilian saxophonist displays an Archie Shepp style sound used in his own way. He has absorbed and digested the history of jazz, all that which has been done on the saxophone, and reuses it in a new manner. It's easy to let oneself get wrapped up in this music, to let oneself be transported into a world in which fantasy and imagination reign supreme.
http://www.musiczoom.it/?p=29040#.WrQ1NX8iG70
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