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Ivo Perelman
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"The dynamic range that they work with is fascinating, the music is alive...an effortless set, the music coming out of Perelman in a constant outpouring, achingly beautiful and abstractly challenging within just a few bars....The fluidity of their music is most striking. Throughout, Shipp's rhythm is riveting, keeping the music flowing, never stagnating."

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"Perelman has made major breakthroughs in the technique of the tenor saxophone, especially in the altissimo higher range notes, which he mastered like no one else...Ivo explores the possibilities of a trio unlike anyone else in this new series of recordings, surely one of the best releases of 2016."

The latest releases by Brazilian saxophonist Ivo Perelman – six recordings for Leo Records – are performed in trio alongside two other musicians, Gerald Cleaver on drums and bassist William Parker, with whom he recorded from the very beginning, as mentioned by the musician in the sleeve notes. The arrival of Ivo in New York was a surprise for the force with which he mastered his instrument. Then the late Rashied Ali completed the trio on drums and their recording of Sad Life for the same label, Leo Records, was greeted warmly by both critics and audiences. Since then Perelman has made major breakthroughs in the technique of the tenor saxophone, especially in the altissimo higher range notes, which he mastered like no one else.
This time he went into the studio, as usual, without giving any directions on what to play, trusting him and his partners(according to William Parker, this is the strength of great musicians). What they do takes place in layers of sound, space, colour and it’s no longer just music, continues Parker, it’s the life of Ivo shared with the outside world. In the face of music it makes little sense to analyse the technical aspects of the communication.
Of the three songs, the first and third go on for about five minutes, while Part 2 lasts more than forty minutes and is a kind of suite; compact, where there is a moment out of place from the bass solo to the way the improvisation of the tenor sax runs. Cleaver, as always is a very proactive, dynamic drummer and interacts at par, making the music come alive, always keeping in perfect empathy with the other musicians that transcends the usual relationship between a soloist and the rhythmic.
Perelman flows all registers of his instrument, from the low breathy notes to the altissimo or more conversational moments, alternating between the two with the sagacity proposed by the atmosphere, and leaving a few minutes of space only for William Parker to integrate into the surroundings. Ivo Perelman explores the possibilities of a trio unlike anyone else in this new series of recordings, surely one of the be releases of 2016.
www.musiczoom.it/?p=26732#.V_l1Z8mXFv0

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"Perelman plays with his stunning high note technique.. the tenor saxophone seems delusional as it moves through the instrument's high notes. It's a unique way of expression, that none of his colleagues can realize in such an accomplished form"

After the recording with Karl Berger and Gerald Cleaver, the tenor saxophonist Ivo Perelman presents the second chapter of his new publications in a trio with Mat Maneri's viola and Whit Dickey's drums. They're musicians who have already participated in some of Perelman's other recordings and here they find themselves celebrating music improvised on the spot. The combination of Perelman and Maneri had already given positive results, even recently in a quartet with a double bass, but this time they decided to somehow “cleanse” the music and, as you can hear by going from one song to the other, to carry out a dialogue equally divided among the three. Among them there is absolute empathy, just as Maneri wrote in the liner notes, where among other things he recalls the time of his first encounter with the saxophonist, a musician who came to New York to surprise the vanguard scene. There is no shortage of interesting moments here, if we take Part 3 as an example, we have five minutes of inventions, Perelman plays with his stunning high note technique to imitate Maneri's strings, the exchanges between the two, and Dickey's fast pace. A pattern that repeats itself, with a slower tempo, in Part 4, it's a subtle dialogue, that you gladly listen to and it's also where at any time the musicians invent new solutions. Sometimes they are things similar to aphorisms, such as in Part 7, with less than a minute of dense interactions among the three. In Part 11 we go back to calmer moments, but always with the tenor saxophone that seems delusional as it moves through the instrument's high notes. It's a unique way of expression, that none of his colleagues can realize in such an accomplished form. Part 13 which closes the album, is short, three intense and aggressive minutes that end in style.
www.musiczoom.it/?p=26784#.V_9rwsj3aJI

Ivo Perelman tenor sax
Mat Maneri viola
Whit Dickey drums

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"Decades after Ben Webster, Don Byas, Getz, Coltrane, Ayler and Sam Rivers, Ivo Perelman returns to this enlightened inspiration, this free sincerity of all calculation that speaks the essence by constantly renewing his quest...his warm voice details the nuances of the upper registers of the instrument with a singing, uniquely passionate quality, so lyrical and so in love with life that he doesn’t seem like he’s repeating himself...although Perelman’s spontaneous process is tireless, we never tire of it"
http://orynx-improvandsounds.blogspot.be/2016/10/mia-zabelka-ivo-perelman-art-of-improv.html

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"Ivo implements a technical superiority..modalities and methods that only the greatest saxophonists can boast..should be compared with the constitutive beauty of the experiments in the Bill Evans Trio..Brad Mehldau for the piano"

The chameleon-like mood for recording large amounts of music is a project with which improvisation musicians inundate listeners in order to uncover each time step of their creation: in most cases they are unnecessary recordings, which foresee technical recompositions which probably aren't even perceived by the listener, but they are at least an indication of an interpretative approach, which aims to highlight a principle of change or a new idea. What is happening to Ivo Perelman, the saxophonist, should be viewed in this direction: I modestly believe that I was one of the few who probed the entire discography of the Brazilian, illustrating the broken variables used to accommodate new developments and with the comfort of the musician himself, we have gone to great lengths to highlight the frontiers pursued in the techniques and the subsequent research on sounds.

The six volumes of “The Art of the improv trio” incorporate as a new element the concentration on the high tones of the tenor sax, made with the adaptation of peacekeeping tonal criteria of improvisation: Perelman says that “....it's not only the change of personnel that makes each result different, but also my personal trajectory in learning to play the saxophone....”; and it is then followed by a method that can be applied using a humoral elaboration of sounds which is a result of the sparks that occur in the higher area of the staff and that can confront themselves with pianos, guitars, violins and basses.

Perelman's volumes show an extension of advanced terminology that should be compared with the constitutive beauty of the experiments in the Bill Evans Trio, as well as the cutting edge it possesses compared to the operation, conceived many years ago by Brad Mehldau for the piano: here reference must go to the sax and if it's true that the common aim is towards new sounds and especially a “chemistry” of the aggregations in a trio, it is also true that Ivo implements a technical superiority (at least for his instrument) which is based on reconstructions of mouthpieces, rescheduling of breathing and a segmentation of the upper register sounds which, in the generous words of Neil Tesser, outline an arsenal of technical contributions to the tenor sax among the most fruitful after Roscoe Mitchell's.

To show off his methods, Perelman has his trusted musicians: with the constant rhythm always present in drums textures, Perelman calls upon Karl Berger's piano (in Volume 1 together with Gerald Cleaver) and Matthew Shipp (in volume 3 always with Cleaver); or he goes against Mat Maneri's violin (in Volume 2 with Whit Dickey on drums), with Joe Morris's guitar (in volume 5 with Cleaver on drums), with William Parker's bass (in volume 4 – Cleaver on drums) and of the same Morris (in vol. 6 – always Cleaver on drums).

A route towards understanding that I could point you towards is the one given by the covers, filled with paintings of Ivo: there is a substantial change, compared to those the saxophonist gave a few years ago, in visually documenting the expressionism of his music and which is reflected in the fact that there is less color and a more linear depictions of the creative impulses: the high notes under discussion are the equivalent of more subtle forms that make up the design; it is as if the materials had become scarce and the use of them was concentrated in the abstract and unpredictable formations, which make the painting view these enigmatic propensities of creativity.

So the very special counterpoint created between Berger or Shipp on the piano compared to that of Maneri or Morris on their respective instruments, seeing as Perelman realizes how much affinity his sax can express with violins or string instruments: based on this you can choose the development which is more suited to your tastes because what comes in vol. 1 and 3 (in contrast with the piano) is a humoral rounding of improvisation that can conflict with the pointiness of the others (especially vol 2 and vol 5) that are the result of an amazingly played head to head with equal capacity by the Brazilian saxophonist. From this point of view even the spiritual value that runs along Parker's performance is moved to another lane. Instead concerning the drumming, the differences are not significant because, despite the fact that Dickey is heavier in hitting than Cleaver, he still shows a polyrhythmic plot of equal thickness, on the rest the expanding strength and the urgent ambition for expressive communication seem to never lessen in the saxophonist of Brazilian origins. They are modalities and methods that only the greatest saxophonists can boast.

http://ettoregarzia.blogspot.com/2016/10/the-art-of-improv-trio-nei-volumi-di.html?m=1


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"Perelman plays with his stunning high note technique.. the tenor saxophone seems delusional as it moves through the instrument's high notes. It's a unique way of expression, that none of his colleagues can realize in such an accomplished form"
After the recording with Karl Berger and Gerald Cleaver, the tenor saxophonist Ivo Perelman presents the second chapter of his new publications in a trio with Mat Maneri's viola and Whit Dickey's drums. They're musicians who have already participated in some of Perelman's other recordings and here they find themselves celebrating music improvised on the spot. The combination of Perelman and Maneri had already given positive results, even recently in a quartet with a double bass, but this time they decided to somehow “cleanse” the music and, as you can hear by going from one song to the other, to carry out a dialogue equally divided among the three. Among them there is absolute empathy, just as Maneri wrote in the liner notes, where among other things he recalls the time of his first encounter with the saxophonist, a musician who came to New York to surprise the vanguard scene. There is no shortage of interesting moments here, if we take Part 3 as an example, we have five minutes of inventions, Perelman plays with his stunning high note technique to imitate Maneri's strings, the exchanges between the two, and Dickey's fast pace. A pattern that repeats itself, with a slower tempo, in Part 4, it's a subtle dialogue, that you gladly listen to and it's also where at any time the musicians invent new solutions. Sometimes they are things similar to aphorisms, such as in Part 7, with less than a minute of dense interactions among the three. In Part 11 we go back to calmer moments, but always with the tenor saxophone that seems delusional as it moves through the instrument's high notes. It's a unique way of expression, that none of his colleagues can realize in such an accomplished form. Part 13 which closes the album, is short, three intense and aggressive minutes that end in style.
http://www.musiczoom.it/?p=26784#.V_9rwsj3aJI

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"the Brazilian saxophonist is one of the greats of contemporary jazz: the ability to play and interact with different musicians, always creating something new...the tenor sax is incredibly present with moments of delusional intensity on the high notes. As always a great recording from the saxophonist."
The first volume of the new series of recordings in the Ivo Perelman Trio sees him back again with one of the players of the free years of the 60s, German vibraphonist, now residing in the USA, Karl Berger, this time on the piano. Completing the trio, Afro-American drummer Gerald Cleaver, and six songs dedicated to total improvisation, as had been the previous recordings in a duet with Berger, which he mentioned in the liner notes. The first meeting with the pianist and vibraphonist was twenty minutes before recording, at the door of the studio; there was talk of anything but how to arrange the music. It is this understanding of improvisation that makes the Brazilian saxophonist one of the greats of contemporary jazz: the ability to play and interact with different musicians, always creating something new.
Let’s take Part 1. in this trio, the sparse tones of the piano create a nocturnal atmosphere, on which Perelman improvises notes blown to Ben Webster, while the brushes of the drummer delicately accompany the free flowing sounds. It gives rise to a special atmosphere, almost romantic, that draws in as it is developed, without a precise harmonic course, free to take liberties as they want, until the end of the piece when the voice of the saxophone regains authority, passing through more “free” moments, such as those that illuminate the outset the Part 2. The dialogue here is more edgy, the piano shows more aggressive moments and the music progresses to other avenues, with Perelman and Cleaver able to shift gears at any time and show a variety of colors and striking techniques.
It’s as if there were no limits, in a land where anything is possible. Part 5 is one of the most interesting moments of the album, the music becomes restless, the trio demonstrates new trends and the tenor sax is incredibly present with moments of delusional intensity on the high notes during the ten minutes of execution. As always a great recording from the Brazilian saxophonist.

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