This picture totally proves that +Tom Coates is totally wrong (I still <3 you, Tom!) about social networks. Note especially the number of views on the photo. There is only one view after one week. On a photo of me making spaghetti with my hands. Compare that with this photo https://plus.google.com/photos/113651174506128852447/albums/posts/5624357001394325106 that was posted to Plus yesterday.

Flickr hasn't suddenly become worse at hosting photos. My friends haven't suddenly become disinterested in food. Nope, it's just that Flickr has become a ghost town. People (like me) still post photos there, but no-one is watching.

Fixing the front page, as +timoni west put it very well (http://blog.timoni.org/post/5557930029/the-most-important-page-on-flickr) might have a great effect. I doubt it, though. As someone who posts photos, I care more that my photos go to where my friends are looking at photos than I do how my friends are looking at photos. Of course, I want the sociality to come back to where I post my photos.

I don't want to post a photo to Flickr, Facebook, Instagram, Plus, and everywhere else that my friends are looking at photos, and then have to manage a fragmented conversation.

Plus is great, and it moves the conversation around design and the social dynamics of online interaction forward an incredible amount. It also underscores the extent to which the systems we've created are totally broken.

tl;dr: Either we were all suffering a massive shared delusion and Flickr actually sucks, or something is really broken with the way that we've structured online social interaction. Evidence: I've had only one view on a photo of making spaghetti with my hands in a week on Flickr. A photo of an ice lolly has 26 comments and 15 likes after one day on Plus.
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