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Joshua Butikofer
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Joshua Butikofer

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"[North Korea's] two previous attempts to put versions of Kwangmyongsong into orbit — one in 1998 and the second in 2009 — both failed to reach the required altitudes, according to experts, and the payloads fell into the sea. The North has rejected this version of events. To this day, it still boasts that a satellite is in orbit, broadcasting patriotic songs." --NYTimes.com

The grandest of accomplishments for any modern nation to achieve, spending millions of dollars and man hours to do it: broadcasting patriotic songs into space? Couldn't they have at least claimed to put up a satellite that could take pictures or spy or something? ;-)
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They are just living in the 1930s.

Hitler’s broadcasting of the 1936 Olympics is regarded as the first signal powerful enough to be carried into space
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Joshua Butikofer

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This article sounds sweet and is one of the media's favorite past times (genius computer nerds which are called wunderkinder because it sounds cool), but I've given Summly a good chance and it is pretty bad. Really bad. I can't say that it provides me hardly any useful information when using its "patent pending machine learning" algorithms.

http://www.theage.com.au/digital-life/smartphone-apps/aussie-wunderkind-gets-us250k-for-technology-that-could-revolutionise-web-20120113-1pz35.html
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Joshua Butikofer

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If you like he idea of a wearable computer imagined in this brief article (http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/12/18/wearing-your-computer-on-your-sleeve/) you should read "Rainbow's End"--it may very well represent our world's future.
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Nice blog entry on coding up alternative implementations in a safe and sane way: http://altdevblogaday.com/2011/11/22/parallel-implementations/
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I'm not aware of such a repository, but I have read a book (and our company has a copy of it) called "Coders at Work" where famous or otherwise prolific coders are interviewed and they reveal some of their coding techniques. One of them that I found most interesting, and that I almost never did until I read the book, was to read other people's code. For example, downloading the code to MySQL or Doom 3 and looking at it. They say a lot can be learned doing this.
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Joshua Butikofer

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Finally solved network problems with Ubuntu 11.04 and 11.10. Turns out my network was so dog slow because of packets being dropped like crazy. This was due to me using a Realtek RTL8168/8111E PCI Express, which Ubuntu (and other distros) recognize as 8169 and install a bad driver.

Use "lshw -C network" to determine if you have this Realtek adapter. You can also see the dropped packets via "ifconfig."

I followed the instructions here to remedy this:

http://www.twm-kd.com/linux/realtek-rtl81688111e-and-ubuntu-linux/
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Joshua Butikofer

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Like this article on management in a tech company (or any knowledge-based company, really): http://www.avc.com/a_vc/2012/02/the-management-team-guest-post-from-joel-spolsky.html
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Joshua Butikofer

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I agree with this--programming puzzles aren't a good indicator of a future employee's value: http://37signals.com/svn/posts/3071-why-we-dont-hire-programmers-based-on-puzzles-api-quizzes-math-riddles-or-other-parlor-tricks

I do believe, however, in very simple demonstrations of reading or writing code. For example, FizzBuzz or explaining to the interviewer what a piece of code does. This helps weed out less than honest candidates (of which I've interviewed a few).

I also understand why large companies use puzzles or programming exercises. They get so many applications, they need a predictable machine and method to increase the likelihood of eliminating poor candidates. I would love to see effective hiring practices scale, though. I think the industry is improving for the most part.
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Why not just ask questions to the person and see how they react?
Ask them to explain how something works, and in what context have they used it.
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Joshua Butikofer

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Wow. This article is about someone with multiple degrees who fails the standardized 10th grade exam is very worrying. Either multiple degrees don't really mean much or the standardized tests don't really mean much. In any case, I agree that tests are a horrible way of judging anyone's potential, talent, and chances for "success":

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/post/when-an-adult-took-standardized-tests-forced-on-kids/2011/12/05/gIQApTDuUO_blog.html
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Joshua Butikofer

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Cringely may be right. The JVM may be the next big thing, if it isn't already:

http://www.cringely.com/2011/10/the-second-coming-of-java/
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I agree...it is a bit confusing. I guess the only reason why is it does allow for dynamic typing. In theory, this may slow down the JVM a bit, but has nothing to do with "disk seeks." Either that or he doesn't really understand Groovy, which would make his arguments less credible...
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Joshua Butikofer

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I've held this opinion for several years now. RMS is the main reason I don't take the FSF seriously anymore:

http://larrythefreesoftwareguy.wordpress.com/2011/10/07/time-to-fork-the-fsf/
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Have him in circles
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