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Environmental Change & Security Program (ECSP)
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Population, Environment, and Security at the Wilson Center
Population, Environment, and Security at the Wilson Center

244 followers
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Environmental Change & Security Program (ECSP)'s posts

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"Water security remains an ambiguous concept with an uncharted path to achievement. Water is an essential resource to our survival and livelihoods, yet most countries lack a clear strategy for how to protect and manage it. With increasing rates and sources of consumption, a growing population, and shifting frequency and intensity of rates of precipitation, continued inaction will have serious impacts on our national security, economy, and environment."

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"Rhino horn is the most valuable illegally traded wildlife product in the world, more expensive per pound than either gold or cocaine and much more valuable than elephant ivory. With as few as 25,000 wild rhinos left in Africa, conservationist and law enforcement fight a constant battle with criminal syndicates seeking to kill rhinos and sell their horns to wealthy consumers abroad, many in Asia."

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"Latin America’s indigenous peoples are the best stewards of the region’s rainforests. But the source of their enthusiasm for environmental protection is more complex than mere ascriptive traits or whether they speak native languages. What’s more, in a development that should be worrying to environmentalists, exposure to the negative effects of extractive industries appears to have a degrading effect on that enthusiasm."

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In the fifth episode of our Backdraft podcast series, Sean Peoples sits down with Ken Conca of School of International Service, AU to talk about the complexities of conflict and cooperation over water.

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In February, the Wilson Center and the Maternal Health Task Force hosted a workshop for maternal health practitioners, researchers, and policymakers focused on what needs to be done to achieve the next generation of maternal health goals.

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On #WorldWaterDay, the Wilson Center's director, president, and CEO Jane Harman and World Wildlife Fund's president and CEO Carter Roberts offer their perspective on the value of a global U.S. water strategy for promoting U.S. prosperity and security in an increasingly water stressed world. 

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"Known as the “vitamins of industry,” rare earths refer to a cluster of minerals widely used in green technologies such as wind turbines, rechargeable batteries, and electric vehicles. Rare earth elements embedded in these products keep them light, efficient, and affordable. They’re essential to the decarbonization of the global economy envisioned in the Paris Climate Agreement, agreed to by 192 countries in 2015. And we may soon face a significant shortage, due in no small part to changes in China."

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"Today, as Afghanistan continues its development with hopes of a brighter future, issues of water management and governance are once again rising to the fore. Industries that are crucial to Afghanistan’s economic growth, such as agriculture and mining, depend on effective water supplies, while a number of factors are increasing stress, including climate change, mismanagement, and population surges as refugees return home."

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Does global water stress matter for U.S. national security, and if so, how? That’s a major focus of the next CNA Military Advisory Board report, says Julia McQuaid of the CNA Corporation in this week’s podcast. She talks about the preliminary findings of the report and how the national security community views water.

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"This week, newly minted Secretary of Defense James Mattis joined a long list of senior U.S. military leaders who have warned about the national security threats of climate change.

In previously unpublished written testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Mattis wrote that 'climate change can be a driver of instability and the Department of Defense must pay attention to potential adverse impacts generated by this phenomenon,' according to Pro Publica, which published parts of his remarks."
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