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Tadeusz Szewczyk (Tad Chef)
11,180 followers -
Helping people with blogs, social media + search. Popularizing ideas, people + things. popularization.info, bike-blog.info, obstacle.love
Helping people with blogs, social media + search. Popularizing ideas, people + things. popularization.info, bike-blog.info, obstacle.love

11,180 followers
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Massive Street #Protests Force #Google to Act on Sexual Harassment
yet their measures are half-hearted and only cover employees
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How Google Protects Sex Criminals
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"Google+ still had some very devoted fans. But why?" Via +Peter Nikolow
Imagine a social network where geeks have higher follower counts than celebrities. Where there’s no advertising. Where trolls get crushed and ordinary people have a voice. Where smart people gather for long, detailed and interesting conversations...

A lovely and appropriate sendoff with a spot-on ending.
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WTH? Those "Secure" Sites Using https/TLS Are Tracking You!
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The #Trust in #Google is Lost via +Kathy D
Google didn't just kill Google+ or Inbox this fall. It killed the trust of its most loyal users. And that's something that may be difficult to revive:
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"our busy minds distract us from immediate experience; we’re too absorbed in our thoughts to be truly present."
Why Buddhism is “right”

By “true” Wright means that Buddhism’s “diagnosis of the human predicament is fundamentally correct, and its prescription is deeply valid and urgently important.”

That diagnosis goes something like this: the human condition is defined by constant and ultimately inexplicable suffering. Meditation isn’t a way out of this suffering. But it helps us transcend it by teaching us to see it clearly for what it is, and by making us more attuned to our emotive impulses and the behaviors they produce.

”One of the things that’s most lacking in the world is not emotional empathy, it’s cognitive empathy, meaning we have trouble seeing things from the point of view of other people... That is more urgently needed than emotional empathy.”

#Meditation, if not quite a solution to this problem, is at least a corrective. By training us to focus our attention on the present moment, to the breath and the body, we can start to see most of our thoughts as petty and our emotions as fleeting. Through this practice, the self starts to dissolve and we can be more aware of other people, and build something like a broader consciousness.

It’s always a useful exercise to try to understand how people are reacting to the world, what made them the way they are, and I think that seems more urgently needed than emotional empathy.

Part of the problem is that our busy minds distract us from immediate experience; we’re too absorbed in our thoughts to be truly present. We’re also stuck with brains that evolved under very different circumstances than we confront today.

We’re hard-wired to pursue pleasure, and that leaves us perpetually unsatisfied. What we have is never quite enough, and so our attention is always directed at the future, at what we think we want. "We're not designed by natural selection to be happy,".
(https://www.vox.com/platform/amp/science-and-health/2017/8/23/16179044/buddhism-meditation-mindfulness-robert-wright-interview)

It doesn't mean we cannot be happy, but is a side effect, not the goal. The second you accept the suffering, you are happy.

Good News — Bad News: A Zen Buddhist Fable

One day in late summer, a farmer was working in his field with his old sick horse. The farmer felt compassion for the horse and desired to lift its burden. So he let his horse loose to go the mountains and live out the rest of its life.

Soon after, neighbors from the nearby village visited, offering their condolences and said, “What a shame. Now your only horse is gone. How unfortunate you are! You must be very sad. How will you live, work the land, and prosper?” The farmer replied: “Who could say? We shall see.”
Two days later the old horse came back rejuvenated after meandering in the mountainside while eating the wild grasses. Returning with him were twelve new and healthy horses which followed the old horse into the corral.

Word got out in the village of the farmer’s good fortune and it wasn’t long before people stopped by to congratulate him on his good luck. “How fortunate you are!” they exclaimed. You must be very happy!” The farmer softly said, “Who could say? We shall see.”

At daybreak on the next morning, the farmer’s only son set off to attempt to train the new wild horses, but the farmer’s son was thrown to the ground and broke his leg. One by one the villagers arrived to bemoan the farmer’s latest misfortune. “Oh, what a tragedy you have had! Your son won’t be able to help you farm with a broken leg. You’ll have to do all the work yourself. How will you survive? You must be very sad,” they said. Calmly going about his usual business the farmer answered, “Who could say? We shall see.”

Several days later a war broke out. The Emperor’s men arrived in the village demanding that young men come with them to be conscripted into the Emperor’s army. As it happened the farmer’s son was deemed unfit because of his broken leg. “What very good fortune you have!!” the villagers exclaimed as their own young sons were marched away. “You must be very happy.” “Who could say? We shall see.” replied the farmer as he headed off to work his field alone.

As time went on the broken leg healed but the son was left with a slight limp. Again the neighbors came to pay their condolences. “Oh what bad luck you have; too bad for you!” But the farmer replied simply, “Who could say? We shall see.”
As it turned out the other young village boys died in the war and the farmer and his son were the only able bodied men capable of working the village lands. The farmer became wealthy and was very generous to the villagers. They said: “Oh how fortunate we are; you must be very happy” to which the farmer softly calmly said, “Who could say? We shall see.”

#Buddha
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