Profile

Cover photo
Crews Giles
Lives in Austin
74 followers|59,146 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideosReviews

Stream

Crews Giles

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
2:19 me, front row at lower right (apparently looking like Eric Johnson) about to get my beer from RD, and then teased by MW for promptly reaching into my pocket to pull out my collapsible beer koozie.  Hey, I came prepared.  Sorry for the commotion Jeff and Bob.

So, about the mistaken identity:

After the TMA ended, RD and I were crossing the street in front of MoMo's on the way to her car when an enthusiastic (and very possibly drunk) college kid came up to us excitedly proclaiming me to be "the BEST guitar player on the planet-- Eric Johnson."

I was trying to get a word in to say I was not Mr. Johnson, but they were all so excited and shaking my hand; so I smiled, looked almost as humble as I felt, and thanked them. They were still back there talking about how cool it was to meet him as we made our way down the street.

Was just listening to "Cliffs of Dover" and so darted back to Google to find this video so I could tell the story.  http://youtu.be/15eu7ar5EKMhttp://youtu.be/15eu7ar5EKM
1
Add a comment...

Crews Giles

Shared publicly  - 
 
In observing relationships, it become clear that indifference is worse than hostility.

An amazing aspect of humanity is that, despite what the universe teaches us, we KNOW it should be, can be, ought to be otherwise.

We have the capacity to make it otherwise.  

Because we matter, we treat that which threatens with an impatient passion (hostility), and we treat that which points to the meaning with a greater passion (love).

Kubrick says we supply our own light, but I submit that is because we know what light is, even if always in total darkness.  We would create light out of nothingness...

...had it not already been done for us. 

"Have I not said you are gods?"
 
NEW COMIC: 'Stanley Kubrick answers a question' http://zenpencils.com/comic/148-stanley-kubrick-answers-a-question/
1
Add a comment...

Crews Giles

Shared publicly  - 
 
As a Christian, having a Master's Degree in Theology, I can, and occasionally do, teach with some authority on such matters...

Genesis (where the "creation story" is found) is clearly a mystical text.  As a mystical text, it had a mystical meaning, and to interpret that requires a mystical perspective.
This whole problem stems from a fundamentalist, sectarian, and secular interpretation of one chapter of one mystical book. 

The vast majority of Christians, Jews, and Muslims resent that simplistic, sectarian and secular interpretation being forced upon us-- or anyone else-- by the fundamentalists.

That evolution is a fact creates no dichotomy for one who believes that God is Creator. 

As even the writer of Genesis knew, that the universe, our planet, and all creatures were created in "seven days" is not possibly taken as a "literal" seven days.  At the start of that creation story, there was no planet Earth spinning before the light of the Sun for which there to be a "day;" so another interpretation must be made-- because another one was intended. 

Even the ancients knew this, the writer of Genesis knew it, the first readers knew it, and most of us still know that today.  We know, for example, that seven is a mystical number, with mystical significance. 

Mystics look for patterns found in nature (including science) and will often speculate if mystically revealed information also has a secular (non-mystical) significance.  If it does not, the secular speculation is abandoned and the mystical truth retained.  For some reason, the fundamentalists fail to make that distinction.  I do not know why.

Personally, I suspect that certain fundamentalists fear spirituality.  That many have removed the mystical aspects of worship from their Sunday services, is the primary cause for my suspicion.  I'll spare you the Latin, but the rule is, "That which is prayed is that which is believed" so if you do not pray the mystical, you do not believe the mystical-- and visa versa. 

At any rate, if one does not possess the ability to take a spiritual perspective, then it would be best if such did not attempt to interpret sacred texts for the rest of us who do.  That is as true concerning fundamentalists as it is concerning atheists.
---

I live in Austin, Texas, which is sort of the atheistic center of Texas, yet my friends and co-workers are good people and good citizens, but they have no idea of the spiritual life I lead.  What is interesting, is that fundamentalists I know are good people and good citizens, but also have no idea of the spiritual life I lead.  You either get it or you don't-- no judgement, but please do not presume to teach.
1
1
Aaron Harper's profile photoCrews Giles's profile photo

Crews Giles

Shared publicly  - 
 
Preparing for Bowl games and Playoffs-- must have the right snack food....
"Texas Trash" -- my gift to pass on to the world, but it comes with a story... A large roaster containing one completed batch of Texas Trash. This recipe has been around since before I was born and is a Giles family stapl...
1
Add a comment...

Crews Giles

Shared publicly  - 
 
A bit of my story-telling and humor.  I wouldn't call it "dry" but it isn't soggy either.

(This one's for 'Brilla whose birthday is tomorrow).
I'm jaded, and I know it.  I sometimes find myself not wanting to be around people.  I like getting away to the woods, but being a city boy, that does not happen often.  Fortunately, my workplace is set between two parks, one...
1
Add a comment...

Crews Giles

Shared publicly  - 
 
The Dsky (Display/Keyboard) was the guidance computer interface aboard the Apollo spacecraft.  If you read transcripts of the Apollo-to-Mission Control dialogues (and I do) this app is just cool.

Sadly, only the programs useful for navigating on Earth are implemented:  Verb 06, noun 22, would display my lunar module's gimbal angles. I mean, I cannot align my platform without that.

Still, I now have the neatest (and nerdiest) way to answer "What time is it?" or "Where are we?"
1
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
74 people
Jayson Greywolf's profile photo
Gayle Smith's profile photo
Yuri Razhiev's profile photo

Crews Giles

Shared publicly  - 
 
Cows and Rockets!

Any day, we expect the FAA report concerning the SpaceX launch facility planned for the Texas Gulf Coast.

This test launch is at the McGregor, Texas, location.  

The launch facility is to be at the southern tip of Texas, in Cameron County.  The southern location provides a slight edge over Cape Canaveral launches since it is slightly south of the Florida site, and so will make better use of the Earth's rotation to assist launches to orbit.
 
The Falcon 9 Reusable (F9R) advanced prototype rocket just flew 1000m, hovered, and landed in Texas. WATCH (+cows!): http://youtu.be/ZwwS4YOTbbw
1
Add a comment...

Crews Giles

Shared publicly  - 
 
We do know where babies come from, don't we?
 
 
First, if we know where babies come from, then we also know where the "choice" is to be made-- and WAS made.

Second, if we do not know when a human life begins (Feeling pain? Consciousness? Incarnate soul?), then we err on the side of caution.

Third, as a pregnancy out of wedlock is potentially two very negative things: A traumatizing social stigma and and an economic disaster. Morally and ethically, we do NOT get to choose to murder (see second item) to avoid these negatives.

Fourth, the baby also recognizes the FATHER's voice! That baby is every bit the choice of the father as it was the choice of the mother (see first item).

Fifth, "conformation bias" when making a decision when in a social or economic crisis (see third item) is not necessarily forever. That is, women who have chosen to abort, often accuse themselves of murder afterward. And THAT has devastating traumatic effects upon the psyche.

In other words, if we do not know if the fetus is a human person or not, and make a decision we later regret in the case of abortion, that action is equivocal to murder which is a far greater trauma to carry than social and economic trauma.

So it is that, outside of a spiritual life, the typical reaction to choosing an abortion is to accept, as FACT, that the abortion did not take a human life. Guilt avoidance will not allow but the most introspective to even begin to consider that one perpetrated an unimaginable horror on another for the shallowest of reasons-- the ultimate betrayal of their own nature.

This then, leads to a person's determination to deny that ANYONE has a soul, that ANYONE rightly has spiritual thoughts, that ANYONE matters.
1
Add a comment...

Crews Giles

Shared publicly  - 
 
My little collection of favorite .gif images...
2
Add a comment...
 
That John Preston guy sure can tell a story (or three)!  ;-)

#fallinfromgrace  
 
The Fall -- Three Stories
This fascinates for several reasons...

My first thought was of my own similar experience. I was walking around a World War II era building at a munici...
1
Aaron Harper's profile photoCrews Giles's profile photo
2 comments
 
Thanks, Aaron. 

In the back of my mind was a thought process which, last week, led me to consider (again) that large populations contained in one society become unable to cope with diverse ideologies-- essentially dehumanizing its members.  Failure, that is, when a group matters more than the person.

The historical or contemporary models which are successful (that come to my mind) are break-away communities which commonality is that they were centered on spiritual or religious ideals.

The American Indian Reservation "experiment" preserved much of a culture, but brought about a crippling economic and social disparity with the greater society-- and rejected by that greater society. 

Whereas, religious/ spiritual-based communities (Essenes, monastic, Mormon, Amish, etc..) had already dismissed worldly principles held by the greater society.  Those seem to place much greater emphasis on the value of the human person.  They are successful, that is, within themselves.

I would add one other variant of the smaller, break-away community, and which is not outwardly spiritual:  The military.  Yet, its members demonstrate a deep seated altruistic principal, including "No man left behind."

Food for thought, anyway.  I may do some more research and write on that more specifically.
Add a comment...

Crews Giles

Shared publicly  - 
 
Big ol' Moon?  Hondo is used to it:
1
Add a comment...

Crews Giles

General Discussion  - 
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
74 people
Jayson Greywolf's profile photo
Gayle Smith's profile photo
Yuri Razhiev's profile photo
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Austin
Previously
Dallas, Texas - Fort Worth, Texas - Richardson, Texas - Nashotah, Wisconsin - Oceanside, California - Alvarado, Texas
Best hamburger I have found in this town. The fries are unusually good, too, and add a milkshake for the perfect indulgent fast food. They have WiFi, and outdoor patio seating. Imaginative use of the old "Arby's" sign!
Public - 11 months ago
reviewed 11 months ago
Good brisket with an above average sauce and a friendly staff who are generous with portions. The seating is comfortable, have televisions for sports, and a good view of busy street and sidewalk (on which you can dine) plus WiFi. I usually order the chopped beef sandwich with a side of green beans and a side of pintos -- the best sides I have found anywhere-- when dinning in. For take-out, sliced brisket and sausage is the way to go. Don't forget the free soft-serve if you left room for something sweet.
• • •
Public - 11 months ago
reviewed 11 months ago
Tears and prayers offered for you.
Public - 12 months ago
reviewed 12 months ago
5 reviews
Map
Map
Map
Good dog! Nice place, good food and service, with plenty of games to share while you eat, or WiFi if you are eating alone. An amazingly different hot dog menu. "Hair of the Dog" is my current favorite.
Public - 11 months ago
reviewed 11 months ago