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Heritage Hydrangeas
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A beautiful display garden of over 100 award-winning hydrangeas, best seen in July and August
A beautiful display garden of over 100 award-winning hydrangeas, best seen in July and August

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Spring has sprung in sunny South Surrey, British Columbia.  The past six weeks have been relatively warm and wet.  The hydrangeas have responded and all, except the paniculatas, are now fully leafed out – the paniculatas, as usual, will be following about three weeks behind the rest.
There is no sign of any winter damage and some shrubs are already showing signs of flower bud development.  So much so, that I am considering bringing forward our Open Garden Weekend by a couple of weeks to catch the best flower display. It should be a great year for hydrangeas!
We acquired 17 new hydrangeas last year and, if these flower well this season, we should be able to add the flower photos and descriptions to our website, bringing our website total to 135 varieties!
We are now open every Saturday, 9 to 5, for the sale of hydrangeas – all are in 2-gallon pots.
The “Available Stock” list on the website www.heritagehydrangeas.com is now up to date.
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Deadheading hydrangeas
The dead heads have been left on this hydrangea macrophylla over winter to provide some protection from frosts.
Now that the new leaf buds are clearly visible, it is time to remove the dead flowerheads.
 
Locate the uppermost pair of new leaf buds and snip off the deadhead immediately above them.  These buds will provide the flowers in the forthcoming season so take care not to remove, or accidentally damage, them.
 
This is not pruning.  Pruning can be done approximately 3 weeks later – see my Facebook page at the appropriate time, or see the website www.heritagehydrangeas.com
 
Other hydrangea species, i.e., H. paniculata, H. quercifolia, H. heteromalla, are not yet showing their new leaf buds; so delay deadheading until they do so.  For more information on pruning all hydrangea species, see www.heritagehydrangeas.com
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2015-03-10
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Best in Class = Best Hydrangea aspera

Before I drag myself away from my hydrangea obsession and start giving attention to Christmas preparations, I can’t resist from publishing another ‘Best in Class’ post.
The third in our series of ‘Best in Class’ features Hydrangea aspera ssp. sargentiana.  The remarkable differentiating feature of the subspecies sargentiana is the white moss-like growth on the new stems.  If grown in a high humidity environment these will be exaggerated.  Additionally, the leaves, when new, are a bright apple green with pink veins and pink petioles.  The leaves are hairy, or velvety, and quite large at 330mm x 180mm.
The flower heads are large lacecaps with pink fertile flowers surrounded by white ray florets.
Introduced from Hubei Province, China, by E. H. Wilson in 1908, this exceptional shrub held the RHS’ Award of Garden Merit from 1993 to 2012.  If your garden only has one Hydrangea aspera – this is the one to have.
For more information on H. aspera ssp. sargentiana and cultivation, pruning and propagation notes on all hydrangeas, go to our website www.heritagehydrangeas.com and ‘Like Us’ on Facebook.
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2014-12-14
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Best in Class = Best panicle hydrangea
 
As we await the first frosts, or, heaven forbid, the first snow flurries, we can only day-dream about what the hydrangeas will look like next season.

The second in our series of ‘Best in Class’ features Hydrangea paniculata ‘Le Vasterival’.  There is a certain similarity in all  the H. paniculata cultivars, they all have flowers that open white and they all adopt pink tones as they age.  H. p. ‘Le Vasterival’ stands out due to the extraordinary shape of the ray florets – like enormous propellers.
 
This rather special hydrangea was introduced from the gardens of Greta Sturdza, Varengeville sur Mer, Normandy, France, in 2012. Patent assigned to Pepinieres Minier. The patent-protected name is ‘Great Star’ PP20,272.
 
This shrub can grow to 2m in height and width, with large white panicle flowers up to 120mm across.  It deserves a place in any hydrangea collection.  With careful pruning, it can also be grown as a ‘standard’.

For more information on H. p. ‘Le Vasterival’ and cultivation, pruning and propagation notes on all hydrangeas, go to our website www.heritagehydrangeas.com and ‘Like Us’ on Facebook.
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READY FOR WINTER?
It’s the first week of November and the first frosts could arrive at any moment.   Fortunately, and most unusually, I have already prepared the Heritage Hydrangea collection for winter.
I have pruned Hydrangea arborescens ‘Annabelle’ to just five inches above ground level.  This is the only hydrangea I prune in the autumn; all the others are pruned in April.
We have just two tender hydrangeas, Hydrangea integrifolia and Hydrangea seemannii, both of which have been wrapped in bubble-wrap and Remay™.  This should be sufficient to protect them from our possible -10°C overnight January temperatures.
All our other hydrangeas – all 120 of them – should survive the winter without special treatment.  Unless the temperature drops below minus twelve °C  I wouldn’t expect any winter die-back.
As the dark winter days lengthen, check out our expanded website, all 109 pages, and don’t forget to ‘like us’ on Facebook.  Thank you.
The third photo is of H. macrophylla ‘Sensation’ – just a reminder of what a wonderful summer it was for hydrangeas in 2014.
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2014-11-04
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Our website, www.heritagehydrangeas.com   now showcases 108 of the 120 hydrangeas we grow at Heritage Hydrangeas.   The recent additions are: H. macrophylla ‘ Sidastell’, H. quercifolia ‘Little Honey’, H. paniculata ‘Bokrathirteen’ and two H. serratas ‘Miyama Yae-murasaki’ and ‘Blue Deckle’.  The photos shown here are of ‘Miyama Yae-murasaki’ and ‘Sidatell’.  Use this website to start planning your 2015 garden.  Hydrangeas are well suited to the BC PNW climate and add loads of colour to your garden late in the season.
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2014-10-18
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