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Kevin Dedicatoria
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Kevin Dedicatoria

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I am optimistic a federal grant to replace the heavily used, outdated buses with newer ones for the Detroit Department of Transportation (DDOT) will be approved. Cutting DDOT bus stops where Metro Detroit's Suburban Mobility Authority for R...egional Transportation (SMART) also stops to pick up passengers is beneficial to prevent overlapping of the two cooperating transit systems. Also, DDOT buses can be used to fulfill demand in other routes or restore services or frequencies nixed because of budget cuts and shrinking revenues. I also like the idea of investing money on the transit system for police and security cameras on buses to improve rider and driver safety. I am happy DDOT is hiring people after cutting 300 drivers and mechanics following a decision by then-Detroit Mayor Dave Bing. I didn't like his decision yet am empathetic to Mayor Bing's action because of budget cuts following the Great Recession and its negative blowback to the city in tax dollars collected. I think the demand is robust for bus services throughout the city of Detroit, including areas outside of Downtown, Midtown, and Corktown, and increasing the bus services in the city will allow those in the city to commute without spending a lot of money for gasoline. I am concerned where and how DDOT is going to acquire the money needed for improvements to its services besides the aforementioned federal grant for new buses. The city is still under bankruptcy and tax dollars for the city and from the state are still not sufficient for the upgrades the DDOT proposes. The new chief, Dan Dirks, is correct on his opinion better transportation and services in general take time to be better for the common good. I do not think quick fixes to problems will solve them in the long term. I think a key factor for major cities and areas to attract and keep businesses and investment is public transportation for its convenience of workers and reduction of congestion and reliance of individual automobiles on roads.
Dan Dirks is the new director of the Detroit Department of Transportation, who returned to metro Detroit in January to lead the city's beleaguered bus system. By the fall, Detroit bus riders should be able to see significant changes in service. In a few years, he said, the system should rival some of the best in the country.
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While the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act or Obamacare is not perfect, healthcare plus access to and the services covered in health insurance are better (http://www.cnbc.com/id/101152063) (https://www.healthcare.gov/what-are-my-preventive-care-benefits/#part=1). I share U.S. Senate Minority Leader Addison Mitchell "Mitch" McConnell's skepticism between the numbers of American enrolled and the same Americans paying their premiums because THAT is the last step before people their health insurance policies for doctor and hospital visits for example. I've stated countless times a combination of private AND government actions must happen before healthcare costs will go down for Americans (e.g. increasing federal payroll tax dollars collected for Medicare, eating foods with more nutritional value for the body, spending an hour on heart-pounding, challenging cardiovascular AND/OR weight training exercise).
A late rush of consumers, seeking coverage as March 31 deadline neared, enrollment to 7.1 million
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Under laws and the constitution my state, same-sex unions are invalid regardless if they're performed in jurisdictions permitting such legal relationships be established. Also, a Michigan Supreme Court ruling interpreted my state's constitutional ban on same-sex unions as prohibiting public employers from granting health insurance and other benefits on the basis of recognizing a relationship between the employee and unmarried partner and dependents. A 2011 law passed also banned public employers, except colleges and universities, from allowing employees to extend health insurance coverage to "other eligible individuals" (a loophole in the Michigan Supreme Court ruling which allowed local governments and postsecondary institutions to extend health insurance benefits to same-sex and unmarried partners WITHOUT observing the relationship between the employee and parties) but was struck down as conflicting with the U.S. Constitution by a U.S. Circuit Court judge. That law's enforcement remains uncertain to my knowledge. Per a ruling by a Michigan court judge overseeing adoptions, the state's adoption code only allows single people and lawfully married individuals under state laws to adopt children. Both Jayne Rowse and April DeBoer adopted one and two children respectively but are raising all three together. However, if either Rowse or DeBoer were to pass away or are incapable of raising their adopted kids, the other will have no legal rights or custody to the other partners' children. Judge Friedman suggested to have the couple challenge Michigan's constitutional ban on same-sex unions instead of the state's current adoption policy. My prediction for the court case challenging Michigan's state constitutional ban on same-sex rulings is U.S. Circuit Court Judge Bernard Friedman will strike down the prohibition as violating the United States' Constitution's 14th Amendment Equal Protection Clause. However, Judge Friedman will issue a stay until the State of Michigan appeals to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit. I will discuss Michigan's current protections for LGBT+/queer/gender and sexual minority (GSM) residents for another article and/or separate blog post.
If you're overweight or old, pregnant or African American, your boss can't fire you for any of those reasons. The law says so. But if you're a gay man or lesbian, there's no such protection — one of several legal issues that's weighing heavily on the gay community as it awaits a decision in Michigan's historic same-sex marriage trial.
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I think the article on the Congressional Budget Office regarding job loss and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act or Obamacare is interesting. It brings an interesting point some Americans work to receive health insurance through the place hiring them. With Obamacare, the implied working class Americans does not have to worry about losing one of two or more jobs and the health insurance accompanying it. The PPACA allows lower-income households and individuals to receive Medicaid or get federal government
tax credits and/or subsidies to purchase and acquire private health insurance. To reduce health care costs requires the involvements of both government and individual Americans. I support raising the payroll tax rate for Medicare from 2.9 percent or up to 3.8 percent total to a combined 6 percent since. A lot of America’s workforce are reaching retirement and able to have Medicare. A lot more tax revenue than what is occurring now must to cover Medicare benefits in addition to how the program operates (e.g. administering of prescription and providing services on an individual basis and as most cost-efficient as possible) to soften the blow of any cuts and negative impact on the U.S. government’s debt. We all must make time to engage in physical activity we know our bodies are being challenged in (e.g. jogging NOT walking) and consume foods and beverages more useful for body functions and strengths (e.g. water NOT soda or energy drinks).
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Kevin Dedicatoria

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I notice important details cut out on this article covering the rise of aerospace and automobile manufacturing in the Southern United States. Half of the states mentioned of aerospace job gains are in states where right-to-work laws are nonexistent (Maryland, Washington, Oregon, Illinois, and Pennsylvania). Right-to-work laws prohibit mandatory payments in unionized workplaces either to be a union member or pay for collective bargaining participation. Kansas, where Boeing closed a factory, is a right-to-work state. Organized labor played a demise to both the city of Detroit and manufacturing due to lucrative demands set during the prosperous times of American manufacturing and other public employees (e.g. cost of living adjustments, decline in tax revenues to pay for worker and retiree benefits). However, they are not the main culprits for the demise of Detroit (e.g. dependency on one industry for tax revenue and city prosperity, racism) and the U.S. automobile companies' decline (e.g. automation, arrogance from little to no competition in the United States from Europe and Asia, terrible quality and reliability of vehicles) over the last 50 years. Also, the per-worker cost difference between union and non-union workers in the automobile industry are shrinking due in part to concessions agreed to in collective bargaining agreements (e.g. transition from defined-benefit pensions to 401(k)s, hourly pay cuts). I think organized labor is becoming more realistic on their approaches to keeping jobs in their areas and not taking a "my way or the highway" mentality and execution. They must continue to be competitive [especially in states where right-to-work laws do no exist] through reducing employee costs, maintaining worker satisfaction (e.g. communication and resolving of work and safety concerns) and representation at the bargaining table and elsewhere, work and personal record NOT buddy favoritism for union management positions, and other things not mentioned.
Aerospace companies are taking a cue from the auto industry and moving their manufacturing operations to Southern states. The region's lower costs, generous state incentive packages and right-to-work laws that make it hard for unions to organize are motivating these companies to choose the South.
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Considering the nearly 100 percent occupancy of residences in Downtown and Midtown Detroit, I welcome this and similar projects intended to reduce the backlogs in apartment, condo, et al. seekers. I also like ideas to include more retail and businesses in both areas of the Motor City. My concern is if and when all the plans (when finished) in Midtown and Downtown Detroit will reap benefits for the city government through additional tax dollars collected from consumers and businesses and residents especially in more impoverished locations. I think the incentives by the Detroit government and private-sector spending heavily focused on two districts in Detroit to attract workers and residents in the city are two important drives in Motown's rise from collapse. More work beyond those two components must be executed, however, to avoid a similar or identical destruction of the city following the implosion of the automobile industry manufacturing.
The Roxbury Group says a five-story development it has planned atop a 10-floor parking garage at 150 Michigan Ave. will offer “unobstructed views” of downtown Detroit.
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Under laws and the constitution my state, same-sex unions are invalid regardless if they're performed in jurisdictions permitting such legal relationships be established. Also, a Michigan Supreme Court ruling interpreted my state's constitutional ban on same-sex unions as prohibiting public employers from granting health insurance and other benefits on the basis of recognizing a relationship between the employee and unmarried partner and dependents. A 2011 law passed also banned public employers, except colleges and universities, from allowing employees to extend health insurance coverage to "other eligible individuals" (a loophole in the Michigan Supreme Court ruling which allowed local governments and postsecondary institutions to extend health insurance benefits to same-sex and unmarried partners WITHOUT observing the relationship between the employee and parties) but was struck down as conflicting with the U.S. Constitution by a U.S. Circuit Court judge. That law's enforcement remains uncertain to my knowledge. Per a ruling by a Michigan court judge overseeing adoptions, the state's adoption code only allows single people and lawfully married individuals under state laws to adopt children. Both Jayne Rowse and April DeBoer adopted one and two children respectively but are raising all three together. However, if either Rowse or DeBoer were to pass away or are incapable of raising their adopted kids, the other will have no legal rights or custody to the other partners' children. Judge Friedman suggested to have the couple challenge Michigan's constitutional ban on same-sex unions instead of the state's current adoption policy. My prediction for the court case challenging Michigan's state constitutional ban on same-sex rulings is U.S. Circuit Court Judge Bernard Friedman will strike down the prohibition as violating the United States' Constitution's 14th Amendment Equal Protection Clause. However, Judge Friedman will issue a stay until the State of Michigan appeals to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit. I will discuss Michigan's current protections for LGBT+/queer/gender and sexual minority (GSM) residents for another article and/or separate blog post.
If you're overweight or old, pregnant or African American, your boss can't fire you for any of those reasons. The law says so. But if you're a gay man or lesbian, there's no such protection — one of several legal issues that's weighing heavily on the gay community as it awaits a decision in Michigan's historic same-sex marriage trial.
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DeBoer v. Snyder involves nurses April DeBoer and Jayne Rowse challenging my state Michigan's state constitutional ban on same-sex unions and adoption code prohibiting two unmarried (by state law) individuals adopting children together. Under Michigan laws and the state's constitution, all same-sex unions are invalid by the state. Public employers (e.g. publicly-funded universities) cannot allow workers to extend their health insurance and other benefits to unmarried partners if the basis recognized their relationship per a Michigan Supreme Court interpretation of the state's same-sex union prohibition. DeBoer is legally the parent of two kids and Rowse one, but both parents are raising all three children together. A study being applied in the trial by sociology professor Mark Regnerus is flawed because of his selection of same-sex couples to confirm his bias children raised by two parents of the same-sex are worse off than opposite-sex parents in his "research." I am cautiously optimistic Michigan's ban will be struck down as violating the United States Constitution's 14th Amendment. Any ruling favoring marriage equality will be appealed to applicable U.S. Circuit Courts of Appeal and likely to the U.S. Supreme Court. Unlike Perry v. Hollingsworth (which legalized marriage equality again in the state of California) and United States v. Windsor, (which granted same-sex couples legally married in jurisdictions where such are legal to be treated equally for federal law and benefits like filing joint taxes but still allows states to define marriage as they please) attorneys general in Oklahoma, Utah, and Michigan are and will continue to defend their states' respective prohibitions on same-sex unions. I do not believe marriage equality should be the primary focus where all time and resources go to. There are other issues and concerns affecting the LGBTQqIA+ & ally (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning, queer, intersex, asexual, etc.)/gender and sexual minority (GSM)/ queer communities worthy of the same energy and contributions (e.g. queer youth homelessness, anti-discrimination ordinances or laws inclusive of sexual orientation and gender identity or expression as protected classes).
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While I oppose the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) because of the job losses in the United States to the countries involved (Yes, that includes jobs to Canada, Australia, and New Zealand) and other reasons, I do not like the resentment by the U.S. automobile industry towards Japan, the Yen and Bank of Japan’s decisions on the currency, and their automobile market. The Bank of Japan actions towards weakening the Yen are the same reasons the Federal Reserve commenced its bond buying program in the United States while [by accident or not] devaluing the United States dollar at times versus other currencies (e.g. Canadian dollar). The B.O.J. wants to boost consumer spending and investment in Japan to boost that country’s economy from deflation and overall slump; which has happened for around 2 decades. When looking at the Japanese consumer markets, Japanese consumers prefer goods and services by fellow Japanese and are distrustful towards foreigners and foreign products per a discussion I had with my macroeconomics professor a while ago. Does this ring alarms for my fellow Americans (e.g. “Buy American,” “Support American workers”)?
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