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Editors Guild
The Northwest Independent Editors Guild connects clients with professional editors in the Pacific Northwest. We also foster community among our members and provide resources for their career development.
The Northwest Independent Editors Guild connects clients with professional editors in the Pacific Northwest. We also foster community among our members and provide resources for their career development.
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Bias in writing is sometimes unavoidable—and usually unintentional. So how do we help writers identify it and remedy it? As editors, we'll most likely encounter biased text at some point in our careers, whether it involves unintentional sexism, racism, ableism, or any language that excludes or offends readers. This panel discussion will explore ways to talk to writers about bias we’ve detected, resources that can help us stay up to date on the best language to use in different situations, and how the handling of bias in works of fiction might be different from nonfiction or technical writing. For additional fun, we'll also discuss how different editors feel about the use of the singular "they."

Please join us on Monday, July 11 for this lively panel discussion moderated by Amanda Vail, with panelists Mary-Colleen Jenkins, Chris Henderson-Bauer, and Christy Karras.

Moderator Bio
Amanda Vail is an editor and writer whose focus is nonprofit housing, the arts, and contemporary geek culture. Learn more about her work at www.threewrens.com and find her on Twitter at @amandamvail.

Panelist Bios
Chris Henderson-Bauer provides developmental editing, substantive editing, and copyediting to publishers and writers. She has been editing since 2005, and she specializes in science fiction and fantasy. You may find her at www.chrishendersonbauer.com or as @chendersonbauer on Twitter, where she tweets about editing genre fiction and her progress writing a contemporary fantasy novel.

Christy Karras specializes in copy and line editing large-scale projects including magazines, websites, and books. Many of her clients are publishers and independently published authors, and her favorite thing is making writers' sentences correct while maintaining their individual voices. Before launching her independent editing career, she was a features writer for the Salt Lake Tribune and an editor for Wasatch Journal and Healthy Living Made Simple magazines as well as the Yahoo Travel website. Karras is also the author of five travel and history books. Find out more at www.christykarras.com.

Mary-Colleen Jenkins is a freelance editor and educator. She has been affiliated with the University of Washington since 2010 and has taught technical communications and editing courses for both professional and undergraduate students. She has a master’s degree in literature and is sometimes surprised to find herself immersed in the engineering and the technical world. Mary-Colleen loves freelance editing and coaching because it offers her the chance to blend the things she loves about teaching—building a connection with and helping people—and her love for tinkering with words and writing.

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In this candid talk suitable for all experience levels, veteran editor and writer Lisa L. Owens will discuss the various ways her children’s-market clients define developmental editing. Using several projects from her portfolio, she will:
* highlight specific tasks assigned to the developmental editor
* delineate dev editing from other disciplines
* explore developmental editing approaches in children’s fiction vs. nonfiction and traditional vs. educational publishing
* outline best practices for working with authors

Specializing in children’s publishing since the early 1990s, Lisa has done editorial work of all stripes on thousands of published products. She also enjoys editing adult-level titles in a variety of genres. The author of 90+ books for young readers, Lisa also writes articles, essays, reviews, and K–12 educational materials.
Editorial services site: owenseditorialink.com
Author site: llowens.com
Twitter:@LisaLOwens
Instagram:@llowriter

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In this candid talk suitable for all experience levels, veteran editor and writer Lisa L. Owens will discuss the various ways her children’s-market clients define developmental editing. Using several projects from her portfolio, she will:
* highlight specific tasks assigned to the developmental editor
* delineate dev editing from other disciplines
* explore developmental editing approaches in children’s fiction vs. nonfiction and traditional vs. educational publishing
* outline best practices for working with authors

Specializing in children’s publishing since the early 1990s, Lisa has done editorial work of all stripes on thousands of published products. She also enjoys editing adult-level titles in a variety of genres. The author of 90+ books for young readers, Lisa also writes articles, essays, reviews, and K–12 educational materials.
Editorial services site: owenseditorialink.com
Author site: llowens.com
Twitter:@LisaLOwens
Instagram:@llowriter

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As independent editors bringing your businesses into 2016, you are just a few clicks away from countless business tools and new apps designed to make your work lives easier. However, sorting through them all (and then learning how to use them) can be a bit of a challenge. In this "Tech Talk," we will pinpoint some of the best new and tried-and-true digital tools for independent business owners and demonstrate key ways to leverage them for your work. From professionally establishing your editing business and engaging new clients to efficiently managing daily tasks and tracking your hours, we will cover the best tech tools to make your work life easier and more effective.
 
We will cover:
> Easy website builders and templates to show off your work and personal brand
> Great applications that help you build contracts, track expenses, and receive payments
> Cloud technology that allows you to send, receive, store, and edit documents from anywhere
> Time-tracking and project management tools that make organizing daily tasks and projects a breeze
> New communication tools to leverage with clients and fellow editors
 
Speaker Bio
Carin Panganiban is a technical project manager, designer, and instructor recently replanted from NYC to Bellevue, WA. Before moving to Washington, she spent several years in trade, academic, and magazine publishing out East in roles that ranged from book design, production management, production editorial, and features editorial. She now works building new websites and applications and teaching adult education classes on technology and design. A serial app and device tester, she loves sharing new tools to help people with their businesses and everyday life.

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Have you been struggling to capture just the right description of yourself on the EdsGuild.org directory? (Do you even have a profile on the EdsGuild.org directory?)

Does the idea of creating a website for your freelance work fill you with dread? Or do you look at your existing site and wonder why it's not drawing the kind of clients you want?

Let's talk about how to use the power of the Internet to position you and your editing services to get the kind of work you want—from how to write a professional bio, to how to stand out in a crowded field, to how to reach out to attract your next client.

Along with a presentation of basic principles, you'll have time to work on your own promotional material with others, sharing and gaining valuable feedback. So bite the bullet and bring whatever profile you currently have. By the end, you will have sculpted a fresher, more effective message.

Our presenter:
Beth Jusino is an editor, teacher, writer, and publishing consultant with fifteen years of experience helping aspiring authors navigate the complicated space between manuscript and published book. She launched her freelance career in 2010 after spending five years as a literary agent. Beth is the author of The Author's Guide to Marketing (Sharper Words Press, 2014) and the e-books Writing a Nonfiction Book Proposal and Market While You Write. She teaches the crafts of writing and marketing at dozens of conferences and gatherings each year, and each quarter, she leads an all-day “Guide to Getting Published” seminar for writers at the University of Washington’s Experimental College.

Visit her online at www.bethjusino.com and on Twitter @bethjusino.

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Have you ever been handed material for an online tutorial to "just copy edit" when it truly needed a complete overhaul? The material was poorly organized; solid text was endless; the author had no idea how to engage students! You may have said, “Excuse me, but this needs a lot more than a copy edit!”

Issues like these—organization, chunking, and audience definition—are solved by instructional designers. Just as editors work with authors and layout designers in a traditional publishing workflow, instructional designers work with subject matter experts, UI designers, and media developers in an eLearning workflow. And, similarly, there are almost as many types of instructional designers as there are types of editors.
Seasoned practitioners James Peters and Sunny Gagliano will introduce you to the world of instructional design and explain the overlap between editorial production and instructional design. Join us to learn how you can incorporate instructional design into your work as an editor and add valuable skills to your toolkit!

Our presenters:

James Peters is an instructional designer, project manager, and entrepreneur with over 20 years of experience in online course planning and development. In 2013, he founded Seabold Learning, a provider of curriculum development services for post-secondary and workforce development programs across the country. James is a member of the UW E-Learning Design & Development Certificate advisory board. He lives on Bainbridge Island.

Sunny Gagliano has been helping publishers, nonprofits, and educational institutions develop print and online educational content for almost 20 years. In 2003, she founded Trillium Publishing to provide editorial, design, and production services to K–12 educational publishers. In 2014, she co-founded Trillium IDS to officially expand into eLearning, providing instructional design and course and media development services for education and nonprofits.

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Creating good relationships with your clients is essential to your professional success and personal well-being. Clear and respectful communication skills are key.

In this short interactive workshop, communication trainer, coach, and writer Sura Hart will teach and demonstrate communication skills that can empower you to handle difficult conversations and difficult clients. Cynthia White, editor, theatre artist, and Guild Board member, will assist Sura in role-plays. You will learn how to:

- Know when to listen and when to talk
- Understand what’s most important to them
- Listen to complaints without taking it personally
- Keep your cool when your client is flipping out
- Talk to yourself in ways that strengthen self-respect & self-compassion
- Give honest feedback that has the greatest likelihood of being heard and appreciated

Sura Hart is an educator, communication coach, mediator, certified trainer with the global Center for Nonviolent Communication, and a leader in incorporating Nonviolent Communication in school communities. Sura co-authored a well-loved book for parents, Respectful Parents, Respectful Kids, as well as two books for teachers: The Compassionate Classroom and The No-Fault Classroom. She has also co-created The No-Fault Zone® Game for ages 5 – 95, supporting meaningful and productive conversations in schools, homes, businesses, and everywhere people want to connect. Sura’s email is sura@thenofaultzone.com. Sura’s website is www.thenofaultzone.com.

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We come into editing careers through many different channels. Some of us bring solid business experience to the table, and some of us cross our fingers and make it up as we go. Do you need more information about setting up your own business? Could things be run more efficiently? What kinds of legal guidance would be helpful to you? What financial questions are puzzling you?

These three panelists have plenty of expertise and experience to share:

Zainab Hussain is an attorney at Foundry Law Group, where she works with innovative clients to protect and leverage their intellectual assets. She combines strategic business and intellectual property solutions through customization and creativity, achieving meaningful and long-term results for clients. When she isn’t working, Zainab enjoys writing for the firm blog, trying out new places to eat, and subsequently, exercising to burn off all those restaurant calories.

Greg Parry has worked in public accounting and private industry for 25 years. He currently has a home-based public accounting practice, providing income tax preparation for individuals and small businesses, tax consulting, Quickbooks training, and bookkeeping. 

Ann Gosch, byGosch Editorial Services, has been an editorial freelancer since 1987. An Oregon State University graduate in textiles and apparel merchandising, she began freelancing in the fashion-sewing industry as a technical and feature writer. Over 15 years, she contributed more than 350 articles to specialty publications and edited books for crafts publishing houses. During the 1990s, she branched out in subject matter and clientele and came to realize that editing was a better fit with her skills than writing. She now focuses on substantive and copy editing of trade periodicals, nonfiction books, and business communications, both inside and outside the sewing industry. She served on the editors guild steering committee from 2002 to 2006, then chaired the EdsGuild conference “Beyond the Red Pencil No. 2,” in 2009.
 
Board member Kathleen Walker will host and moderate the evening.

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How do you feel about marketing your services? If you’re like many freelancers (and introverts), you might consider it a necessary evil. Beth Buelow, founder of The Introvert Entrepreneur, says that it doesn’t have to be that way. During this interactive workshop, you’ll gain new insights and ideas that make your outreach and relationship building easier, more comfortable, and—dare we say?—fun! Beth’s review of sales basics just might enlist your true strengths and alter your view of the entire process. Plus, we’ll tackle one challenge that stymies introverts and extroverts alike: what to say when you talk about yourself.

Beth Buelow, ACC, CPC, serves as a guide to introvert entrepreneurs who want to amplify their strengths and build sustainable, energetically aligned businesses. She is a professional coach, author, podcaster, and speaker. Based in the Pacific Northwest, she serves introverts worldwide. Beth is the author of Insight: Reflections on the Gifts of Being an Introvert (2012) and the forthcoming The Introvert Entrepreneur (Perigee Books, 2015). Find her online at www.theintrovertentrepreneur.com.
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