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Michael Hendricks
Works at PriceCharting
Attended Carnegie Mellon University
Lives in Hanna, WY
393 followers|450,626 views
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"She raised a few eyebrows and then she went on down alone"

Classic Johnny Cash at work today
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I'm surprised this hasn't happened earlier.  People love to hate ReservationHop and similar services, but the first-come-first-served system for allocating restaurant tables, parking spaces, etc. leaves room for improvement.

If resources aren't allocated by price, they're allocated by something else: time, race, beauty, influence, bribes.
Alinea is not a restaurant...at least, not in a conventional sense.
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That was a fascinating read.  Great info about restaurant business and the problems they face with real numbers to back it up.

I agree that deposit on future bill is the best option.  Most restaurants would not be able to charge for access if they tried.
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Once your car's fossil burning engine is used only to drive an electric motor (a la freight locomotives), you can dramatically simplify the engine by removing all the rotating parts.  That improves efficiency and should reduce manufacturing cost too.  Very clever.
Range-extending gas engines have a big problem: they're engineered to rotate wheels, not provide electricity. The Free Piston Engine Linear Generator cuts out the middleman for a huge efficiency boost.
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Income taxes make me want to cry.  That is all.
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Both. And that those resources, used in almost any other way, might have made the world a better place.
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I just paid for my first hotel room with Bitcoin (on Expedia).  It was faster than typing in a credit card number and way more nerdy.
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Thanks for the info, Michael! 
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My takeaways from Google IO 2014:

First, the video linked below is the best IO talk I've ever seen. If you're interested in Project Tango, Project Ara or how Google's Advanced Technologies and Projects division works, this is for you.

After seeing all the Android Wear APIs and app demos, I ordered a Samsung Gear Live for both me and my wife. Smartphone usage patterns, voice capabilities and my experience with Pebble tell me smartwatches are the future.

I was excited to see that Android L is making efforts to prioritize notifications, make them aware of the user's context, and make them disappear completely (configurable "do not disturb" mode). I've spent almost 100 hours working on a similar project, but may abandon it now that Google has its sites on the same target.

I'm also excited that Android L implements a feature I requested back in 2012: https://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=128550 I take no credit, but it's fun when that happens.

Google Cloud Dataflow looks like a powerful tool for some stuff we do at PriceCharting. I'm glad that Google continues to open their data processing stack to outside developers.
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Android L does work with all those notification types.  It also has rudimentary notification rules. Their first release probably covers 80% of what I had in mind for notifications.

They don't cover unified inbox or global inbox prioritization, so perhaps I can continue in that niche.

I'm now leaning towards a generic web services rule system so power users can build the tools they want on top of Zapier, IFTTT, Twilio, etc.  For example, a few dozen rules would be enough to create a complete, personalized Google Voice clone.
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Michael Hendricks

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For all you ladies with programmers in your life. We're sorry.
 
This is totally true!
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Haha.  Most likely, he rushed out of bed early in the morning because he awoke with the answer.  She woke up to an empty bed and grew more despondent.  
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Have him in circles
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A couple days ago, I replaced my Pebble with a Samsung Gear Live.  So far Android Wear is a substantial improvement.  Voice commands have been reason enough for me to upgrade.  I use them about a dozen times per day (mostly to take quick notes for myself).  I also find it helpful to be able to dismiss Android notifications from my watch.

It looks like the watch will get better than 37 hours from one charge.  That's based on fairly heavy usage, leaving the watchface on for the first dozen hours and sleeping in it the first night.  I've now allowed the device to completely turn off the screen if it wants to.  That should further increase battery life.

I don't sleep with it anymore either.  When I'd roll over in my sleep the watchface would light up and wake me.  Until there's a sleep mode to prevent that, I'll charge the device at night.  I miss having sleep tracking, so I may wear my Pebble at night until Sleep as Android supports Wear.

The pedometer and heart rate monitor both work fairly well.  They've been accurate for me, but +Kinsey Hendricks has had some problems with hers.  I find it helpful to have both a step count and a heart rate measurement on my daily walks.

The Google Keep app is handy. It lets you view notes and check items off lists from the watch.  It should be especially useful for shopping lists.

There have been a couple minor annoyances with the watch.  I can't send Google Voice texts via voice commands. GTasks and "take a note" no longer work together (since the most recent Google Keep update). Showering with the watch randomly triggers voice commands so I can't wear it there.  A touch face watch presents some challenges when holding an inquisitive baby in my arms.

Overall, the upgrade has been positive.  I don't plan to go back to my Pebble.
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I've enjoyed that too.  Starting apps is the same way, "OK Google, start Keep"
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Michael Hendricks

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I'm always looking for good news in politics.  I think this qualifies.
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We had a couple little visitors come to the back door this morning
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Are you my mother? You're not my mother, you're a snort!
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Sporting events are like A/B tests designed to find the best team.  I wonder if soccer's low average goal differential means that it does a relatively poor job recognizing differences between teams.

For example, a final score of 1-0 could mean that one team is better than the other.  It might also mean that the teams are equally good but a random error or bad call flipped the outcome.  In A/B testing, a small differential requires many repeats to confidently discern the best alternative.

I suspect that games like basketball (typical differential 10-20 points), Aussie football (10-20 points) or cricket (50-100 runs) make it more obvious which team is the best.  Those first two games also award points in proportion to difficulty.  For example, in basketball, a free throw is 1 point, a basket is 2 points, a long range basket is 3 points.

I wonder if there's a good way to measure how big of an effect this has.  Maybe comparing match results against the predictions made by each team's World Football Elo Rating.  Elo scores are calculated for many sports, so it might be a way to compare across sports.

Of course, none of this makes soccer less enjoyable to play, but it makes me think that best-of-seven might be a more effective tournament technique for soccer than single elimination is.
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Only slightly related, but I thought this was neat: http://www.optasports.com/  They collect data about every pass, shot, goal, yellow card, etc.  Google used it as the data source for their World Cup prediction model.
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A diesel-electric drivetrain (like freight locomotives) lets this VW "go from San Francisco to Los Angeles and back on less than three gallons of fuel"
It's time to redefine the supercar, and the 261 MPG Volkswagen XL1 is the first draft in a new history of uber-capable machines.
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This type of technology, for vehicle energy, seems like the best solution for me as a consumer. Rather than requiring a 2 hour charge, a 7 hour sun bake, or a 26 hour wind collection to "refill the tank" let's make gasoline engines more efficient. That enables road trips and quick refills to still exist. 
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People
Have him in circles
393 people
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Education
  • Carnegie Mellon University
  • Cherry Creek High School
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
May 1
Relationship
Married
Work
Occupation
Software Developer
Employment
  • PriceCharting
    Owner, 2007 - present
  • JJ Games
    Software Developer, 2001 - present
  • Hendricks Solutions
    Owner, 2006 - present
  • Southwest Counseling Service
    Software Developer, 2002 - 2012
  • Grant Street Group
    Perl Developer, 2006 - 2011
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Hanna, WY
Previously
Rock Springs, WY - Laramie, WY - Pittsburgh, PA - Hof, Germany
The coffee drinkers in my group raved about the drinks. The pastries were delicious and the location quiet and away from most of the tourists.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Excellent service, great location, comfortable beds and accommodations. Internet costs €23 per day, so you're better off buying a SIM card and getting Internet through your phone.
Quality: ExcellentFacilities: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
A clean professional office with polite staff. The exam was thorough and he explained my personal conditions clearly. After 4 years with another eye doctor, we're switching to Mark. Great location too.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Our Chevy Suburban started making really loud noises from the engine area. Our previous mechanic had moved out of town, so we decided to try Skyline's service department. After two days, we hadn't heard back from them, so we called to get an update. They had finished diagnosing the problem, but forgot to call us with the results. They told us "just from listening to it, we can tell you it needs a new engine." They quoted $6,000 to replace it. We decide to get a second opinion. When I picked up the vehicle, they said "Do you want to trade it in on a new truck? Lots of people do that when they hear the engine is shot." By this point, the whole place seemed like a scam so I declined and said we'd consider our options. It turns out that the engine was fine. It was only a broken catalytic converter which a different mechanic charged $1,500 to fix. After this ordeal, another (former) Skyline customer told us, "I wouldn't even take my car to Skyline for an oil change."
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Quality: Poor to fairAppeal: GoodService: Poor to fair
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
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Great waiting area for kids. Staff is friendly and knowledgeable. Dr VanTassel is kind and helpful. Even when my daughter needed a cavity filled, she thought this dentist was fun.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
After a local dealership told us our Chevy Suburban needed a new engine, we brought it to Kar Kraft for a second opinion. We'd heard good things about Kar Kraft from people around Rawlins. The mechanics were thorough and prompt with a diagnosis. They provided plenty of detail to help us understand what was happening. It wasn't a broken engine after all so they saved us $4,000 on repairs. During the entire process, they clearly explained how long everything would take. They phoned us as soon as the vehicle was ready. When we picked up the Suburban, they gave us the results of a full-vehicle inspection they had done. They warned us about a couple minor repairs that might grow more serious over time. There was no pressure; just friendly, helpful information. Highly recommended.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Fast, polite and did a good job.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago