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International Space Station & The Moon Together: View 2 (closeup)
Dylan: "I was super happy to catch the silhouette of the ISS over the disc of the moon last night! The CalSky website sends me alerts for potential flyovers for which I’ve been waiting a long time—about 12 months. I got one this week and this was adjusted by 15 seconds by the time of the 'occultation'."

"If you think that it might be a case of sitting there with your camera and a clock, with one hand on the shutter release, you’d be absolutely correct! The ISS only passed over the moon for 0.33 seconds as it shoots by quite quickly. Knowing the second it would pass I fired a 'burst' mode of exposures then crossed my fingers and hoped it would show up in review—and it did!"

The setup was my Canon 70D attached to the rear cell of my Celestron 9.25″ telescope (2300mm / f10). The shutter speed was a quick 1/1650th of a second and ISO 800 in order to freeze the ISS in motion.

"I took about a second of further exposures on either side of the pass to stack the lunar surface detail using AutoStakkert2, and the increased the saturation in post to create this color enhanced version of the moon. The colors on the moon relate to the chemical composition of moon geology."

Credit: Dylan O’Donnell
Date: June 30, 2015

+NASA Johnson Space Center 

#NASA #Space #ISS #Earth #Moon #Lunar #Australia #Spacecraft #Technology #Engineering #Astrophotography #Science #Art #Expedition44   #YearInSpace #JourneytoMars #Mars
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Jackie Burroughs Anderson's profile photoKari Roberts's profile photoJorge Martinez's profile photoJames Morrison's profile photo
 
Amazing
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Dwayne Lawrence's profile photoMaría del Rosario Eguía's profile photoHD PICTURE's profile photoDerek Sr's profile photo
 
Vancouver looks to be out of the smoke zone, us on Vancouver Island are completely smoked in.
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NASA-Boeing X-48 Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Project: View 7
A view of the X-48B Hybrid Wing Body aircraft near Edwards Air Force Base after a test flight from NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California. The long boom protruding from between the tails is part of the aircraft's parachute-deployment flight termination system.
 
After flying the remotely-piloted X-48B and X-48C Hybrid/Blended Wing Body research aircraft for nearly six years, the joint NASA-Boeing X-48 project team concluded a highly successful and productive flight test project at NASA’s Armstrong (formerly Dryden) Flight Research Center in 2013.

The manta-shaped X-48 Hybrid Wing Body technology demonstrator flew a total of 122 flights, 30 of them as the C-model. The last flight of the X-48C occurred on April 9, having first flown eight months ago on Aug. 7, 2012.

“We have accomplished our goal of establishing a ground to flight database, and proving the low speed controllability of the concept throughout the flight envelope,” said Fay Collier, manager of NASA’s Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. “Both very quiet and efficient, the hybrid wing body has shown promise for meeting all of NASA’s environmental goals for future aircraft designs,” Collier said.

The aircraft, designed by The Boeing Co. and built by Cranfield Aerospace Limited of the United Kingdom, was flown in partnership with NASA. The X-48C model, which was formerly the X-48B Blended Wing Body aircraft, was modified to evaluate the low-speed stability and control of a low-noise version of a notional, future Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft design. The HWB design stems from concept studies being conducted by NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation project of future potential aircraft designs 20 years from now.

“Our team at NASA Dryden (Armstrong) has done what we do best, flight test a unique aircraft and repeatedly collect data that will be used to design future ‘green’ airliners,” said Heather Maliska, NASA Dryden’s X-48C project manager. “It is bittersweet to see the program come to an end, but we are proud of the safe and extremely successful joint Boeing and NASA flight test program that we have conducted.”

Primary changes to the C model from the original B version that flew 92 flights at Dryden between 2007 and 2010 were geared to transforming it to an airframe noise-shielding configuration. External modifications included relocating the wingtip winglets inboard next to the engines, effectively turning them into twin tails. The aft deck of the aircraft was extended about two feet to the rear. Finally, the project team replaced the X-48B's three 50-pound thrust jet engines with two 89-pound thrust engines.

"Our goal was to define the low-speed envelope and explore the low-speed handling qualities of the Blended Wing Body class of tailless aircraft, and we have accomplished that," added Mike Kisska, Boeing's X-48 flight test project manager.

The X-48C retained most dimensions of the B model, with a wingspan just longer than 20 feet, and a weight of about 500 pounds. The aircraft had an estimated top speed of about 140 mph, and a maximum altitude of 10,000 feet.

Because handling qualities of the X-48C differed from those of the X-48B, the project team modified the flight control system software, including flight control limiters to keep the airplane flying within a safe flight envelope. This enabled a stronger and safer prototype flight control system suitable for further development for potential full-scale commercial hybrid or blended wing aircraft in the future.

NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate and Boeing funded the X-48 technology demonstration research effort, which supported NASA's goals of reduced fuel burn, emissions and noise.
 
Credit: NASA

+NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center 
+Boeing+ 

#NASA #Space #Aeronautics #Aircraft #Boeing #X48 #X48B #X48C #Hybrid #Blended #Wing #Body #HWB #Tailless #Design #Aviation #Research #Flight #Testing #Unmanned #Aerial #Vehicle #UAV #Edwards #California #UnitedStates #USA #USAF #AirForce #Military #Science #Technology #Engineering #Dryden #Armstrong
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Marco Barnes (Barno)'s profile photomdimrul hasan's profile photoGilberto Ruiz Rojina's profile photoRicardo Blanco (Mr. White)'s profile photo
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Cool. I wonder how well this design performs in strong turbulence since the body probably generates a lot of lift.
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NASA-Boeing X-48 Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Project: View 5
Earth and sky meet in this view of the X-48C Hybrid Wing Body aircraft as it flies over Edwards Air Force Base in during a test flight from NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California during 2013. The long boom protruding from between the tails is part of the aircraft's parachute-deployment flight termination system.
 
After flying the remotely-piloted X-48B and X-48C Hybrid/Blended Wing Body research aircraft for nearly six years, the joint NASA-Boeing X-48 project team concluded a highly successful and productive flight test project at NASA’s Armstrong (formerly Dryden) Flight Research Center in 2013.

The manta-shaped X-48 Hybrid Wing Body technology demonstrator flew a total of 122 flights, 30 of them as the C-model. The last flight of the X-48C occurred on April 9, having first flown eight months ago on Aug. 7, 2012.

“We have accomplished our goal of establishing a ground to flight database, and proving the low speed controllability of the concept throughout the flight envelope,” said Fay Collier, manager of NASA’s Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. “Both very quiet and efficient, the hybrid wing body has shown promise for meeting all of NASA’s environmental goals for future aircraft designs,” Collier said.

The aircraft, designed by The Boeing Co. and built by Cranfield Aerospace Limited of the United Kingdom, was flown in partnership with NASA. The X-48C model, which was formerly the X-48B Blended Wing Body aircraft, was modified to evaluate the low-speed stability and control of a low-noise version of a notional, future Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft design. The HWB design stems from concept studies being conducted by NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation project of future potential aircraft designs 20 years from now.

“Our team at NASA Dryden (Armstrong) has done what we do best, flight test a unique aircraft and repeatedly collect data that will be used to design future ‘green’ airliners,” said Heather Maliska, NASA Dryden’s X-48C project manager. “It is bittersweet to see the program come to an end, but we are proud of the safe and extremely successful joint Boeing and NASA flight test program that we have conducted.”

Primary changes to the C model from the original B version that flew 92 flights at Dryden between 2007 and 2010 were geared to transforming it to an airframe noise-shielding configuration. External modifications included relocating the wingtip winglets inboard next to the engines, effectively turning them into twin tails. The aft deck of the aircraft was extended about two feet to the rear. Finally, the project team replaced the X-48B's three 50-pound thrust jet engines with two 89-pound thrust engines.

"Our goal was to define the low-speed envelope and explore the low-speed handling qualities of the Blended Wing Body class of tailless aircraft, and we have accomplished that," added Mike Kisska, Boeing's X-48 flight test project manager.

The X-48C retained most dimensions of the B model, with a wingspan just longer than 20 feet, and a weight of about 500 pounds. The aircraft had an estimated top speed of about 140 mph, and a maximum altitude of 10,000 feet.

Because handling qualities of the X-48C differed from those of the X-48B, the project team modified the flight control system software, including flight control limiters to keep the airplane flying within a safe flight envelope. This enabled a stronger and safer prototype flight control system suitable for further development for potential full-scale commercial hybrid or blended wing aircraft in the future.

NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate and Boeing funded the X-48 technology demonstration research effort, which supported NASA's goals of reduced fuel burn, emissions and noise.
 
Credit: NASA

+NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center 
+Boeing+ 

#NASA #Space #Aeronautics #Aircraft #Boeing #X48 #X48B #X48C #Hybrid #Blended #Wing #Body #HWB #Tailless #Design #Aviation #Research #Flight #Testing #Unmanned #Aerial #Vehicle #UAV #Edwards #California #UnitedStates #USA #USAF #AirForce #Military #Science #Technology #Engineering #Dryden #Armstrong 
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NASA-Boeing X-48 Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Project: View 3
Earth and sky meet in this view of the X-48C Hybrid Wing Body aircraft as it flies over Edwards Air Force Base in during a test flight from NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California during 2013. The long boom protruding from between the tails is part of the aircraft's parachute-deployment flight termination system.
 
After flying the remotely-piloted X-48B and X-48C Hybrid/Blended Wing Body research aircraft for nearly six years, the joint NASA-Boeing X-48 project team concluded a highly successful and productive flight test project at NASA’s Armstrong (formerly Dryden) Flight Research Center in 2013.

The manta-shaped X-48 Hybrid Wing Body technology demonstrator flew a total of 122 flights, 30 of them as the C-model. The last flight of the X-48C occurred on April 9, having first flown eight months ago on Aug. 7, 2012.

“We have accomplished our goal of establishing a ground to flight database, and proving the low speed controllability of the concept throughout the flight envelope,” said Fay Collier, manager of NASA’s Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. “Both very quiet and efficient, the hybrid wing body has shown promise for meeting all of NASA’s environmental goals for future aircraft designs,” Collier said.

The aircraft, designed by The Boeing Co. and built by Cranfield Aerospace Limited of the United Kingdom, was flown in partnership with NASA. The X-48C model, which was formerly the X-48B Blended Wing Body aircraft, was modified to evaluate the low-speed stability and control of a low-noise version of a notional, future Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft design. The HWB design stems from concept studies being conducted by NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation project of future potential aircraft designs 20 years from now.

“Our team at NASA Dryden (Armstrong) has done what we do best, flight test a unique aircraft and repeatedly collect data that will be used to design future ‘green’ airliners,” said Heather Maliska, NASA Dryden’s X-48C project manager. “It is bittersweet to see the program come to an end, but we are proud of the safe and extremely successful joint Boeing and NASA flight test program that we have conducted.”

Primary changes to the C model from the original B version that flew 92 flights at Dryden between 2007 and 2010 were geared to transforming it to an airframe noise-shielding configuration. External modifications included relocating the wingtip winglets inboard next to the engines, effectively turning them into twin tails. The aft deck of the aircraft was extended about two feet to the rear. Finally, the project team replaced the X-48B's three 50-pound thrust jet engines with two 89-pound thrust engines.

"Our goal was to define the low-speed envelope and explore the low-speed handling qualities of the Blended Wing Body class of tailless aircraft, and we have accomplished that," added Mike Kisska, Boeing's X-48 flight test project manager.

The X-48C retained most dimensions of the B model, with a wingspan just longer than 20 feet, and a weight of about 500 pounds. The aircraft had an estimated top speed of about 140 mph, and a maximum altitude of 10,000 feet.

Because handling qualities of the X-48C differed from those of the X-48B, the project team modified the flight control system software, including flight control limiters to keep the airplane flying within a safe flight envelope. This enabled a stronger and safer prototype flight control system suitable for further development for potential full-scale commercial hybrid or blended wing aircraft in the future.

NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate and Boeing funded the X-48 technology demonstration research effort, which supported NASA's goals of reduced fuel burn, emissions and noise.
 
Credit: NASA

+NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center 
+Boeing+ 

#NASA #Space #Aeronautics #Aircraft #Boeing #X48 #X48B #X48C #Hybrid #Blended #Wing #Body #HWB #Tailless #Design #Aviation #Research #Flight #Testing #Unmanned #Aerial #Vehicle #UAV #Edwards #California #UnitedStates #USA #USAF #AirForce #Military #Science #Technology #Engineering #Dryden #Armstrong
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NASA-Boeing X-48 Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Project: View 1
Earth and sky meet in this view of the X-48C Hybrid Wing Body aircraft as it flies over Edwards Air Force Base in during a test flight from NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California during 2013. The long boom protruding from between the tails is part of the aircraft's parachute-deployment flight termination system.
 
After flying the remotely-piloted X-48B and X-48C Hybrid/Blended Wing Body research aircraft for nearly six years, the joint NASA-Boeing X-48 project team concluded a highly successful and productive flight test project at NASA’s Armstrong (formerly Dryden) Flight Research Center in 2013.

The manta-shaped X-48 Hybrid Wing Body technology demonstrator flew a total of 122 flights, 30 of them as the C-model. The last flight of the X-48C occurred on April 9, having first flown eight months ago on Aug. 7, 2012.

“We have accomplished our goal of establishing a ground to flight database, and proving the low speed controllability of the concept throughout the flight envelope,” said Fay Collier, manager of NASA’s Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. “Both very quiet and efficient, the hybrid wing body has shown promise for meeting all of NASA’s environmental goals for future aircraft designs,” Collier said.

The aircraft, designed by The Boeing Co. and built by Cranfield Aerospace Limited of the United Kingdom, was flown in partnership with NASA. The X-48C model, which was formerly the X-48B Blended Wing Body aircraft, was modified to evaluate the low-speed stability and control of a low-noise version of a notional, future Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft design. The HWB design stems from concept studies being conducted by NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation project of future potential aircraft designs 20 years from now.

“Our team at NASA Dryden (Armstrong) has done what we do best, flight test a unique aircraft and repeatedly collect data that will be used to design future ‘green’ airliners,” said Heather Maliska, NASA Dryden’s X-48C project manager. “It is bittersweet to see the program come to an end, but we are proud of the safe and extremely successful joint Boeing and NASA flight test program that we have conducted.”

Primary changes to the C model from the original B version that flew 92 flights at Dryden between 2007 and 2010 were geared to transforming it to an airframe noise-shielding configuration. External modifications included relocating the wingtip winglets inboard next to the engines, effectively turning them into twin tails. The aft deck of the aircraft was extended about two feet to the rear. Finally, the project team replaced the X-48B's three 50-pound thrust jet engines with two 89-pound thrust engines.

"Our goal was to define the low-speed envelope and explore the low-speed handling qualities of the Blended Wing Body class of tailless aircraft, and we have accomplished that," added Mike Kisska, Boeing's X-48 flight test project manager.

The X-48C retained most dimensions of the B model, with a wingspan just longer than 20 feet, and a weight of about 500 pounds. The aircraft had an estimated top speed of about 140 mph, and a maximum altitude of 10,000 feet.

Because handling qualities of the X-48C differed from those of the X-48B, the project team modified the flight control system software, including flight control limiters to keep the airplane flying within a safe flight envelope. This enabled a stronger and safer prototype flight control system suitable for further development for potential full-scale commercial hybrid or blended wing aircraft in the future.

NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate and Boeing funded the X-48 technology demonstration research effort, which supported NASA's goals of reduced fuel burn, emissions and noise.
 
Credit: NASA

+NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center 
+Boeing+ 

#NASA #Space #Aeronautics #Aircraft #Boeing #X48 #X48B #X48C #Hybrid #Blended #Wing #Body #HWB #Tailless #Design #Aviation #Research #Flight   #Testing   #Unmanned   #Aerial #Vehicle #UAV #Edwards   #California   #UnitedStates #USA #USAF   #AirForce #Military #Science   #Technology   #Engineering #Dryden #Armstrong
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Have them in circles
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International Space Station and The Moon Together: View 1
Dylan: "I was super happy to catch the silhouette of the ISS over the disc of the moon last night! The CalSky website sends me alerts for potential flyovers for which I’ve been waiting a long time—about 12 months. I got one this week and this was adjusted by 15 seconds by the time of the 'occultation'."

"If you think that it might be a case of sitting there with your camera and a clock, with one hand on the shutter release, you’d be absolutely correct! The ISS only passed over the moon for 0.33 seconds as it shoots by quite quickly. Knowing the second it would pass I fired a 'burst' mode of exposures then crossed my fingers and hoped it would show up in review—and it did!"

The setup was my Canon 70D attached to the rear cell of my Celestron 9.25″ telescope (2300mm / f10). The shutter speed was a quick 1/1650th of a second and ISO 800 in order to freeze the ISS in motion.

"I took about a second of further exposures on either side of the pass to stack the lunar surface detail using AutoStakkert2, and the increased the saturation in post to create this color enhanced version of the moon. The colors on the moon relate to the chemical composition of moon geology."

Credit: Dylan O’Donnell
Date: June 30, 2015

+NASA Johnson Space Center 
+Lunar and Planetary Institute 
+Google Lunar XPRIZE 
+NASA Lunar 

#NASA #Space #ISS #Earth #Moon #Lunar #Australia #Spacecraft #Technology #Engineering #Astrophotography #Science #Art #Expedition44   #YearInSpace #JourneytoMars #Mars 
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4 comments
 
Nice catch!!
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Fresh Fruit Delivered! | International Space Station
Scott: "Christmas in July! Great gift for my 100th day in space! Only ~250 more to go (not that I’m counting)."

Credit: NASA/JSC, U.S. Astronaut Scott Kelly
Date: July 5, 2015

+Scott Kelly 
+NASA Johnson Space Center 

#NASA #Space #ISS #Food   #FreshFruit #Russia #Progress #Supply #Ship #Spacecraft #Россия #Прогресс #Technology #Engineering #Cosmonauts #Astronaut #ScottKelly #Expedition44 #YearInSpace #JourneytoMars   #Mars
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maricris cabrera's profile photoТимур Хамидулин's profile photoFranklin Stone's profile photopadmakar andhra's profile photo
9 comments
 
Уважаемый Скотт Келли,просьба передайте большой привет Геннадию Ивановичу и Сергею Борисовичу. Мы рады,что у Вас там всё хорошо.
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NASA-Boeing X-48 Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Project: View 6
Earth and sky meet in this view of the X-48C Hybrid Wing Body aircraft as it flies over Edwards Air Force Base in during a test flight from NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California during 2013. The long boom protruding from between the tails is part of the aircraft's parachute-deployment flight termination system.
 
After flying the remotely-piloted X-48B and X-48C Hybrid/Blended Wing Body research aircraft for nearly six years, the joint NASA-Boeing X-48 project team concluded a highly successful and productive flight test project at NASA’s Armstrong (formerly Dryden) Flight Research Center in 2013.

The manta-shaped X-48 Hybrid Wing Body technology demonstrator flew a total of 122 flights, 30 of them as the C-model. The last flight of the X-48C occurred on April 9, having first flown eight months ago on Aug. 7, 2012.

“We have accomplished our goal of establishing a ground to flight database, and proving the low speed controllability of the concept throughout the flight envelope,” said Fay Collier, manager of NASA’s Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. “Both very quiet and efficient, the hybrid wing body has shown promise for meeting all of NASA’s environmental goals for future aircraft designs,” Collier said.

The aircraft, designed by The Boeing Co. and built by Cranfield Aerospace Limited of the United Kingdom, was flown in partnership with NASA. The X-48C model, which was formerly the X-48B Blended Wing Body aircraft, was modified to evaluate the low-speed stability and control of a low-noise version of a notional, future Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft design. The HWB design stems from concept studies being conducted by NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation project of future potential aircraft designs 20 years from now.

“Our team at NASA Dryden (Armstrong) has done what we do best, flight test a unique aircraft and repeatedly collect data that will be used to design future ‘green’ airliners,” said Heather Maliska, NASA Dryden’s X-48C project manager. “It is bittersweet to see the program come to an end, but we are proud of the safe and extremely successful joint Boeing and NASA flight test program that we have conducted.”

Primary changes to the C model from the original B version that flew 92 flights at Dryden between 2007 and 2010 were geared to transforming it to an airframe noise-shielding configuration. External modifications included relocating the wingtip winglets inboard next to the engines, effectively turning them into twin tails. The aft deck of the aircraft was extended about two feet to the rear. Finally, the project team replaced the X-48B's three 50-pound thrust jet engines with two 89-pound thrust engines.

"Our goal was to define the low-speed envelope and explore the low-speed handling qualities of the Blended Wing Body class of tailless aircraft, and we have accomplished that," added Mike Kisska, Boeing's X-48 flight test project manager.

The X-48C retained most dimensions of the B model, with a wingspan just longer than 20 feet, and a weight of about 500 pounds. The aircraft had an estimated top speed of about 140 mph, and a maximum altitude of 10,000 feet.

Because handling qualities of the X-48C differed from those of the X-48B, the project team modified the flight control system software, including flight control limiters to keep the airplane flying within a safe flight envelope. This enabled a stronger and safer prototype flight control system suitable for further development for potential full-scale commercial hybrid or blended wing aircraft in the future.

NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate and Boeing funded the X-48 technology demonstration research effort, which supported NASA's goals of reduced fuel burn, emissions and noise.
 
Credit: NASA

+NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center 
+Boeing+ 

#NASA #Space #Aeronautics #Aircraft #Boeing #X48 #X48B #X48C #Hybrid #Blended #Wing #Body #HWB #Tailless #Design #Aviation #Research #Flight #Testing #Unmanned #Aerial #Vehicle #UAV #Edwards #California #UnitedStates #USA #USAF #AirForce #Military #Science #Technology #Engineering #Dryden #Armstrong
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Cesar Garcia's profile photoR Cl's profile photoDeric Vazquez's profile photomdimrul hasan's profile photo
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+Eleanor Gay. Shouldn't it sting like a manta ray?
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NASA-Boeing X-48 Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Project: View 4
Earth and sky meet in this view of the X-48C Hybrid Wing Body aircraft as it flies over Edwards Air Force Base in during a test flight from NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California during 2013. The long boom protruding from between the tails is part of the aircraft's parachute-deployment flight termination system.
 
After flying the remotely-piloted X-48B and X-48C Hybrid/Blended Wing Body research aircraft for nearly six years, the joint NASA-Boeing X-48 project team concluded a highly successful and productive flight test project at NASA’s Armstrong (formerly Dryden) Flight Research Center in 2013.

The manta-shaped X-48 Hybrid Wing Body technology demonstrator flew a total of 122 flights, 30 of them as the C-model. The last flight of the X-48C occurred on April 9, having first flown eight months ago on Aug. 7, 2012.

“We have accomplished our goal of establishing a ground to flight database, and proving the low speed controllability of the concept throughout the flight envelope,” said Fay Collier, manager of NASA’s Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. “Both very quiet and efficient, the hybrid wing body has shown promise for meeting all of NASA’s environmental goals for future aircraft designs,” Collier said.

The aircraft, designed by The Boeing Co. and built by Cranfield Aerospace Limited of the United Kingdom, was flown in partnership with NASA. The X-48C model, which was formerly the X-48B Blended Wing Body aircraft, was modified to evaluate the low-speed stability and control of a low-noise version of a notional, future Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft design. The HWB design stems from concept studies being conducted by NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation project of future potential aircraft designs 20 years from now.

“Our team at NASA Dryden (Armstrong) has done what we do best, flight test a unique aircraft and repeatedly collect data that will be used to design future ‘green’ airliners,” said Heather Maliska, NASA Dryden’s X-48C project manager. “It is bittersweet to see the program come to an end, but we are proud of the safe and extremely successful joint Boeing and NASA flight test program that we have conducted.”

Primary changes to the C model from the original B version that flew 92 flights at Dryden between 2007 and 2010 were geared to transforming it to an airframe noise-shielding configuration. External modifications included relocating the wingtip winglets inboard next to the engines, effectively turning them into twin tails. The aft deck of the aircraft was extended about two feet to the rear. Finally, the project team replaced the X-48B's three 50-pound thrust jet engines with two 89-pound thrust engines.

"Our goal was to define the low-speed envelope and explore the low-speed handling qualities of the Blended Wing Body class of tailless aircraft, and we have accomplished that," added Mike Kisska, Boeing's X-48 flight test project manager.

The X-48C retained most dimensions of the B model, with a wingspan just longer than 20 feet, and a weight of about 500 pounds. The aircraft had an estimated top speed of about 140 mph, and a maximum altitude of 10,000 feet.

Because handling qualities of the X-48C differed from those of the X-48B, the project team modified the flight control system software, including flight control limiters to keep the airplane flying within a safe flight envelope. This enabled a stronger and safer prototype flight control system suitable for further development for potential full-scale commercial hybrid or blended wing aircraft in the future.

NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate and Boeing funded the X-48 technology demonstration research effort, which supported NASA's goals of reduced fuel burn, emissions and noise.
 
Credit: NASA

+NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center 
+Boeing+ 

#NASA #Space #Aeronautics #Aircraft #Boeing #X48 #X48B #X48C #Hybrid #Blended #Wing #Body #HWB #Tailless #Design #Aviation #Research #Flight #Testing #Unmanned #Aerial #Vehicle #UAV #Edwards #California #UnitedStates #USA #USAF #AirForce #Military #Science #Technology #Engineering  #Dryden #Armstrong
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NASA-Boeing X-48 Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Project: View 2
Earth and sky meet in this view of the X-48C Hybrid Wing Body aircraft as it flies over Edwards Air Force Base in during a test flight from NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California during 2013. The long boom protruding from between the tails is part of the aircraft's parachute-deployment flight termination system.
 
After flying the remotely-piloted X-48B and X-48C Hybrid/Blended Wing Body research aircraft for nearly six years, the joint NASA-Boeing X-48 project team concluded a highly successful and productive flight test project at NASA’s Armstrong (formerly Dryden) Flight Research Center in 2013.

The manta-shaped X-48 Hybrid Wing Body technology demonstrator flew a total of 122 flights, 30 of them as the C-model. The last flight of the X-48C occurred on April 9, having first flown eight months ago on Aug. 7, 2012.

“We have accomplished our goal of establishing a ground to flight database, and proving the low speed controllability of the concept throughout the flight envelope,” said Fay Collier, manager of NASA’s Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. “Both very quiet and efficient, the hybrid wing body has shown promise for meeting all of NASA’s environmental goals for future aircraft designs,” Collier said.

The aircraft, designed by The Boeing Co. and built by Cranfield Aerospace Limited of the United Kingdom, was flown in partnership with NASA. The X-48C model, which was formerly the X-48B Blended Wing Body aircraft, was modified to evaluate the low-speed stability and control of a low-noise version of a notional, future Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft design. The HWB design stems from concept studies being conducted by NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation project of future potential aircraft designs 20 years from now.

“Our team at NASA Dryden (Armstrong) has done what we do best, flight test a unique aircraft and repeatedly collect data that will be used to design future ‘green’ airliners,” said Heather Maliska, NASA Dryden’s X-48C project manager. “It is bittersweet to see the program come to an end, but we are proud of the safe and extremely successful joint Boeing and NASA flight test program that we have conducted.”

Primary changes to the C model from the original B version that flew 92 flights at Dryden between 2007 and 2010 were geared to transforming it to an airframe noise-shielding configuration. External modifications included relocating the wingtip winglets inboard next to the engines, effectively turning them into twin tails. The aft deck of the aircraft was extended about two feet to the rear. Finally, the project team replaced the X-48B's three 50-pound thrust jet engines with two 89-pound thrust engines.

"Our goal was to define the low-speed envelope and explore the low-speed handling qualities of the Blended Wing Body class of tailless aircraft, and we have accomplished that," added Mike Kisska, Boeing's X-48 flight test project manager.

The X-48C retained most dimensions of the B model, with a wingspan just longer than 20 feet, and a weight of about 500 pounds. The aircraft had an estimated top speed of about 140 mph, and a maximum altitude of 10,000 feet.

Because handling qualities of the X-48C differed from those of the X-48B, the project team modified the flight control system software, including flight control limiters to keep the airplane flying within a safe flight envelope. This enabled a stronger and safer prototype flight control system suitable for further development for potential full-scale commercial hybrid or blended wing aircraft in the future.

NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate and Boeing funded the X-48 technology demonstration research effort, which supported NASA's goals of reduced fuel burn, emissions and noise.
 
Credit: NASA

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Boeing X-48 in Full Scale Wind Tunnel | NASA Langley
The Boeing X-48 was the final aircraft tested in the NACA/NASA Full Scale Wind Tunnel at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in Hampton, Virginia.

The Boeing X-48C research aircraft flew for the 30th and final time April 9, 2013, marking the successful completion of an eight-month flight-test program to explore and further validate the aerodynamic characteristics of the Blended Wing Body design concept.

All 30 flights were conducted at NASA's Armstrong (formerly Dryden) Flight Research Center. The X-48C typically flew for approximately 30 minutes on most flights, reaching speeds of up to 140 miles per hour and attaining an altitude of about 10,000 feet. X-48C flight testing began Aug. 7, 2012.

Boeing and NASA will continue to develop Blended Wing Body technology, with the aspiration of developing a larger-scale, transonic BWB demonstrator in the future.

Image Credit: NASA 
Acknowledgement: Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum

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