Profile

Cover photo
Dorothy Deasy
10,112 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

Dorothy Deasy

Shared publicly  - 
 
Those who have skilled-level jobs, especially tech jobs, are unlikely aware how much of the country is suffering from under- or unemployment.
Entertainment television portrays people with lifestyles that reflect those who have upper-middle income or wealthy lifestyles. The news does not adequately communicate (especially not nearly as effectively as this chart) the disparity and widening gulf. So those who are wealth-advantaged are able to live in a bubble, with their own lifestyles being reflected back to them.
Meanwhile, the "middle class" is evaporating, as more and more people sink from comfortable to struggling.
And AI which will displace even more workers is approaching. It is like watching an economic hurricane Katrina approach the shore and wondering, why aren't people preparing?
 
Just a reminder that the employment ratio is still worse than most of the past three decades. 
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Dorothy Deasy

Shared publicly  - 
 
When they think no one is watching...
 
CYNICAL POLITICS: GIVING NATIVE AMERICANS THE SHAFT
Despoliation of the sublime and the sacred is what Resolution Copper has in store for this unusual Sonora Desert Riparian Area. Never mind that this land was deeded by President Eisenhower for conservation --as usual, the Republican tactic is: when you don't get what you want, change the rules. Even if the Native Americans get screwed over again and the mine goes forward, will the taxpayers and citizenry get anything from such a lavish bestowal of pristine land into the hands of a private mining company? The citizens of the U.S. will get exactly zero. It remains to be seen if a White House petition and the dedicated work of activists can stop this predatory land grab. 
The San Carlos Apache Tribe is battling to save a sacred site that has been federally protected from mining since 1955.Video: What could be lost if Resolution Copper and BHP Billiton were permitted to mine copper on sacred Apache land in Arizona.
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Dorothy Deasy

Shared publicly  - 
 
How often do humans need to learn: when in doubt, err on the side of openness and inclusiveness?
 
The great K-Cup foul up

Consumers almost universally hate DRM. Companies that implement it will face some backlash, but implementing it badly and greedily will find it will cost them business.

FTA:
There’s an important lesson for tech companies here. We’re willing to give you our money, but not our freedom. If we buy a product, we expect to own it, not to lease, rent, or borrow it. We want to use things in any way we please—and we’ll find a way to make sure that we can. You can either set your company up as a hero and support our freedoms, or as a villain that we’ll continually battle against
When it comes to modern technological conveniences, there are a number of things that irritate people above all others: unhelpful error messages, dead batteries, and cumbersome digital rights management (DRM). A company that puts DRM in place on their products is very clearly telling consumers that their freedoms will be sacrificed so that corporate execs can…
22 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Dorothy Deasy

Shared publicly  - 
 
Just because it is so cool!
 
Art On Ferrofluid.
Join the Simple Science and Interesting Things Community and share interesting stuff!
https://plus.google.com/communities/117518490246975838002

A ferrofluid (portmanteau of ferromagnetic and fluid) is a liquid that becomes strongly magnetized in the presence of a magnetic field. Ferrofluid was invented in 1963 by NASA's Steve Papell as a liquid rocket fuel that could be drawn toward a pump inlet in a weightless environment by applying a magnetic field
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrofluid

http://i.imgur.com/19on7ug.gifv
1 comment on original post
1
Add a comment...

Dorothy Deasy

Shared publicly  - 
 
"The Second Machine Age" points out that "the primary driver of growing inequality...is exponential, digital, and combinatorial change in the technology that undergirds our economic system." That means, in part, that there are fewer jobs. Basic income could restore our social fabric by allowing people to volunteer their time and talents for the common good.
 
Well sourced treatment of the questions surrounding wage slavery and basic income.
4 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Dorothy Deasy

Shared publicly  - 
 
What happens when capital trumps employment...
 
The middle 60% is now the middle 20%.
Noah Smith (at Bloomberg) recently wrote: "A plurality of Americans still consider themselves middle-class.” (A plurality meaning, more than any other, but not an absolute majority.) But he linked to The Guardian to make his case, which appears to be saying something completely different: ...
View original post
1
Add a comment...
 
This makes mind-uploading much easier to understand: less like magic and more like science.
2
Add a comment...

Dorothy Deasy

Shared publicly  - 
 
So glad this issue is finally getting covered
 
'The Hunting Ground': New Documentary from 'The Invisible War' Team Tackles Campus Rape

In one of the many troubling and eye-opening scenes in director Kirby Dick and producer Amy Ziering’s new documentary, The Hunting Ground, we witness the blurry visual and crystal-clear audio footage of the night a Harvard fraternity surrounded a dorm housing many of the first-year women. “No means yes!” the frat boys shout in unison, and then, “Yes means anal!” They repeat the chant again and again, interrupted only by one member’s insistence that they yell even louder.
The film looks at how colleges and universities silence survivors of sexual assaults on campus.
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Dorothy Deasy

Shared publicly  - 
 
And here it is: the diverging paths ahead. Considerations for ensuring that hope, pride and self-esteem can continue to be renewable resources.
Gross domestic product is a misleading measure of national success. Countries should act now to embrace new metrics, urge Robert Costanza and colleagues.
1
Add a comment...

Dorothy Deasy

Shared publicly  - 
 
Economics is always about more than money. How will these changes influence the trajectory of freedom, kindness, compassion and non-violence?
 
"The Great Decoupling." Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee start at about 16 mins in. America has never been richer. Private wealth is over $80 trillion, income has never been higher, and worker productivity has never been higher than it is right now. But there is a paradox: median income is lower now than 15 years ago, the employed share of the population has fallen. Machines have been improving at dexterity, language, and unstructured problem solving. "When will you have the capability for a fully autonomous car?" He said yesterday. They are going to wait until the fully automatic mode is 10x better than the average human driver, not just at parity. Brute force doesn't work against the game of Go but using pattern matching systems on a library of Go games, and it can figure out the strategies. These are framing remarks for a panel discussion.
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Dorothy Deasy

Shared publicly  - 
 
much needed!
 
As Madeline Lancaster lifts a clear plastic dish into the light, roughly a dozen clumps of tissue the size of small baroque pearls bob in a peach-­colored liquid. These are cerebral organoids, which possess certain features of a human brain in the first trimester of development—including lobes of cortex. The bundles of human tissue are not exactly “brains growing in a dish,” as they’re sometimes called. But they do open a new window into how neurons grow and function, and they could change our understanding of everything from basic brain activities to the causes of schizophrenia and autism.


Top: Madeline Lancaster figured out a way to keep neurons growing in a dish until they develop characteristics of living human brains.

Middle: Magdalena Renner, a graduate student in the lab, examines organoids under a microscope.

Bottom: A variety of organoids are kept alive on a shaker plate in an incubator.

Before it grows in one of Lancaster’s dishes, a brain organoid begins as a single skin cell taken from an adult. With the right biochemical prodding, that cell can be turned into an induced pluripotent stem cell (the kind that can mature into one of several types of cells) and then into a neuron. This makes it possible to do things that were impossible before. Now scientists can directly see how networks of living human brain cells develop and function, and how they’re affected by various drug compounds or genetic modifications. And because these mini-brains can be grown from a specific person’s cells, organoids could serve as unprecedentedly accurate models for a wide range of diseases. What goes wrong, for example, in neurons derived directly from someone with Alzheimer’s disease?
A new method for growing human brain cells could unlock the mysteries of dementia, mental illness, and other neurological disorders.Availability: now
View original post
1
Add a comment...
 
The Bill Cosby story proves a useful metaphor for talking about abusive power. Do we want a culture based on violence, or one driven by love?
1
Add a comment...