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Tom Galloway
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Tom Galloway commented on a post on Blogger.
OK, what happened was Peter went to work for Tony Stark, and during the comics version of Civil War and the Tony supported Superhero Registration Act Peter revealed his identity to the whole world. A while after this, Aunt May was shot and in critical condition and likely to die. Mephisto aka Marvel's version of the devil, offered Peter and MJ a deal; he'd cure May and revert Peter's secret id if Pete and MJ would sacrifice their marriage such that it never happened. They took it. So, yes, they solved the plot corner by Spider-Man doing a deal with the devil. Not a particularly popular story.
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Tom Galloway commented on a post on Blogger.
Overall for Wonder Woman, I'd recommend the George Perez issues from 1987, collected in several Omnibuses.
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Tom Galloway commented on a post on Blogger.
IMO, it goes downhill once the original writer, Brian Vaughn, leaves the book. Yes, even the Joss Whedon written ones. On the other hand, it's about two issues into a return by YA author Rainbow Rowell and these are back up there in quality.
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Tom Galloway commented on a post on Blogger.
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Tom Galloway commented on a post on Blogger.
Well, for what it's worth, AJ was in this set of Hugo nominees:
Ancillary Justice, Ann Leckie (Orbit US/Orbit UK)
Neptune’s Brood, Charles Stross (Ace / Orbit UK)
Parasite, Mira Grant (Orbit US/Orbit UK)
The Wheel of Time, Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson (Tor Books / Orbit UK)
Warbound, Book III of the Grimnoir Chronicles, Larry Correia (Baen Books)

Which did effectively make it one of only three, maybe two, nominees. Ignore Warbound; that was Correia pitching a hissy fit and running a campaign to try to win a Hugo with what amounts at best to a standard piece of commercial fiction (don't get me wrong; I enjoy me some good commercial fiction. But there's nothing of note or that stands out about this novel). Wheel of Time was its fans doing an "interesting" reading of the rules and managing to nominate the entire 15 book series...since no individual book in it had ever made the Hugo shortlist. Parasite's also interesting. I don't think "Mira" (Seanan McGuire's pen name) actively tried to get her stuff nominated that year or ever went over a line, unlike Correia. However, she was coming off a previous year where her fans went sorta nuts and got her 5 or so Hugo nominations. I think Parasite was substantially above Warbound, but still borderline at best for a Hugo.

Over in the Nebulas, a whole different kettle of fish. The nominees were:
Ancillary Justice, Ann Leckie
We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, Karen Joy Fowler
The Ocean at the End of the Lane, Neil Gaiman
Fire with Fire, Charles E. Gannon
Hild, Nicola Griffith
The Red: First Light, Linda Nagata
A Stranger in Olondria, Sofia Samatar
The Golem and the Jinni, Helene Wecker

I've not read most of these, so can't comment on how strong the ballot was.

On the flip side, I have seen a lot of people highly praise AJ, both before and after awards season, so it may be that you just bounced off it.
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Tom Galloway commented on a post on Blogger.
The three comics definitely making my Hugo noms are The Sculptor by Scott McCloud, The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage by Sydney Padua, and Sandman Overture by Neil Gaiman and J.H. Williams.
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Tom Galloway commented on a post on Blogger.
Charlie said at Worldcon the protagonist of the next Laundry novel will be neither Bob nor Mo (he said who it would be, but spoilers).
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Tom Galloway commented on a post on Blogger.
Oh, there's character development going on. By season three, most of the characters are in different places than the start of season one (save that Laurel's still annoying). Season two was when the show really came into its own. And for what it's worth, Ollie's Silver Age origin wasn't that different from the show's; he fell overboard, washed up on a deserted island and he picked up archery with homemade bow and arrows to hunt food. Eventually he was rescued, and decided to fight crime due to defeating pirate types on his rescue ship.
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Tom Galloway commented on a post on Blogger.
Um, you do know that Joe Hill is Stephen King's son, right?
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Thoughts on Yahoo!'s predicament.

As I wrote when Bartz' firing hit, "Here's the basic question any CEO has to answer; what is Yahoo! the best at? Not just what's best at Yahoo!, but best in the world at. If the answer's nothing, what do they have a reasonable chance at becoming best in the world at? If nothing, they're basically in a death spiral." Implicit in that was that whatever it was bring in substantial revenue.

But when's the last time you were excited about something coming out of Yahoo!? I honestly can't recall myself.

There's now some talk of Yahoo! putting itself up for sale. Honestly, I can't think who'd be a reasonable match for them, because, ironically enough, they have the problem of being too big with too many things going on.

Offhand, I can think of 5 companies that might consider buying them. In rough order of perceived likelihood, Microsoft, Oracle, AOL, HP, and Facebook. Google won't even bother thinking about it; in addition to it being a horrible idea (especially since they've already got a 20K company to merge into a quirky culture), the Feds would never left them do it.

Microsoft's probably the leader to get search if Yahoo! gets broken up; after all, they're doing it already. And given Ballmer's apparent "must beat Google at their own game" obsession, it's a possibility. I don't see it as doing anything more than bringing Microsoft and Yahoo! web/online innovation/development to a screeching halt for a year or so though.

Oracle, well, because they seem to be willing to buy just about any software company and have the numbers, both financially and headcount, to be able to pull it off. And they don't really have anything in Yahoo's space to my knowledge.

AOL + Yahoo! equals two failures hoping to get one success out of the combination. I don't think it makes any sense, but someone might try slamming them together via a private equity joint buyout.

HP, just because I don't think they have any idea what they want at the moment. Had Cisco not apparently learned to stick to their core area, I'd've listed them here with HP under "No real reason for them to buy Yahoo!, but a whim might hit the right people and cause them to buy it and suffer the hangover, er, buyer's remorse".

One could actually make a case for Facebook buying Yahoo! in order to fill out their arsenal against Google. However, I think it'd be a horrible mistake in that Facebook just isn't big enough. Oh, they could afford to buy Yahoo!, but Yahoo! has 10+x the headcount and a vast number of projects. Even if you plan to put Yahoo! on a plan to strip it down to a core set, it'd take way too high a percentage of Facebook's executives and upper management to implement it.

Oh, and one other possibility. Apple. But why? Yahoo! doesn't fill any obvious holes or needs in what they're doing, and they don't need the hassle of trying to revive what's there.

I suppose the most likely option would be a private equity buyout and an attempt after to suck up as much revenue as possible before it completely becomes a death spiral of declining revenue/eyeballs. Otherwise, despite they're still being a profitable company, I don't see Yahoo! as contributing enough to any major company to be worth the significant cost of integrating Yahoo! into them.
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