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Plato Nista
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Plato Nista

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This amuses me.
 
Green river in Chicago!! Not much of difference between the original color but still cool.
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Plato Nista

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Humor for your day.
 
How it really happened

#therealdeal #saintpatrick #snakes #ireland  
#TurningWheel  
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Plato Nista

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New song from the Faint.
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Apparently my fan base is in Finland. Who knew?

It seems that Numero 83 is also known as Numero Kasikolme. This is what Google Translate provides concerning the lyrics of my song:

"Jacket and Gold ring with money and a cigar lit all know your name All ments not know where kii And do not you know That some other women are in someone else's? / / Hey, you do not get it destined to become Hey, you do not get a platonic love / / Where didst march through the night It's a fucking fake mask from the back You thought you once again onnistuvas, but yet you'll find that regret And do not you know That some other women are in someone else's? / / Hey, you do not get it destined to become Hey, you do not get a platonic love / / Plato ... Plato on love I know you can hear how Sulle laughed at / / Hey, you do not get it destined to become Hey, you do not get a platonic love Plato, platonic love / / you must not, no, no you can not get no, no, you do not get no, no, you do not get Plato on love"

I'm hoping this is a completely accurate translation because it's a rather profound if bizarre commentary, but I suppose the odds of that are low. They had me at, "Jacket and Gold ring with money and a cigar lit".
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Thomas Walton's profile photo
 
That's great! Off to look for my fan base now :)
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Plato Nista

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What a sad situation. Not only is it very hard to ensure that the most vulnerable people have adequate supplies of water, but what are they doing about livestock and other animals who were also exposed?
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Scott Hatch's profile photoDerek Bruneau's profile photo
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If corporations can find a way to make money out of it, then it will be Washington's top priority. Until then, try to blame it on Al Qaeda - that will get you a billion a day if you can pull it off. 

https://plus.google.com/u/0/114189320023965792424/posts/VMLb8uFHbxc
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Plato Nista

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Yes, both Creighton and Nebraska are in the tourney, in the West region, and will play each other Sunday if they both win their first games!
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Plato Nista

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Please don't click on this link because they don't deserve the hits; I include it only out of fairness because I plan to criticize. Turns out that the "6 Best Pieces" are all (surprise!) cheap take-downs of the "ban bossy" campaign, and they say much the same things you could have guessed in advance. In response, I send this simple plea out to the universe: Ban Mindlessly Literalist Misreadings! Ban this entire ill-humored, stunted approach to discourse. If you don't grasp that Sheryl Sandberg has not magically appointed herself the power to actually Ban Words From The Language, then you have no business writing public essays or commentary of any sort. If you don't realize that the "Bossy Ban" directly implicates other choicer and more effectively sexist words like Bitchy, please have some humility before offering such a pathetic critique, since this public campaign is also for the 10 year olds. Why would any sensate person who has ever had to interpret texts conclude that The Point of this campaign is to change behaviors by creating new "bad words", rather than to focus attention on bad behaviors and bolster the young women who are about to confront them head-on? Because they like to trash Sheryl Sandberg, that's why: it's easy and earns some clicks. I have yet to read a critique of Sandberg's book that evidences an actual reading of the words on its pages, so I can only imagine it's glorious for the critics to be entirely freed of any responsibility for evidentiary support while laying into a two-word slogan. The upside here is that the public response Sandberg reaps serves precisely to underscore several key points she made in the book, for those who read it. She explains not only THAT women will encounter this anti-bossy reaction in the workplace, but also how to counteract it. In short, contrary to what the "best" critics of the "ban bossy" slogan would have you believe, she explains precisely what women who want to transcend this problem might need to do. No, it doesn't involve a censorship campaign but it might require a bit of critical thinking.

In other news, three people have held doors open for me today, once while I was carrying a hot coffee. Bless you, polite young men who (hopefully) grasp that feminism is not at odds with common courtesy.
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Plato Nista's profile photoJane Shevtsov's profile photo
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So why not just extend "bossy" to boys? I'm pretty sure it's sometimes applied to them even now.
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Terrific essay from Walter Dean Myers in the NYT. From my perspective trying to buy books for my kids and other people's kids, and reflecting on the books I loved most as a child, I think this is a huge issue not easily overstated. One of the many good things literature does for you is to allow you to inhabit someone else's perspective, and see different possible selves in your own life. If the range of those selves is always so narrow, we make our young readers live under arbitrary limits. I think it does real damage to everyone in a community, though especially to children who never see aspects of their own lived experience represented in literature and opened further to the imagination. As Myers says, there is work to be done.
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Plato Nista

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Research steadily piling up in support of the idea that laughter promotes cardiovascular health, reduces anxiety, and offers a host of other benefits. If you aren't sure how to get started in a world full of depressing news and events, well, just watch this.
 
Here's your LOLS For the day

Yer welcome.
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Plato Nista

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Edge has published responses from many scientists to the question, what scientific idea is ready for retirement? It's a terrific read and some of them (including the ones having to do with happiness, moral blank-slate-ism, and neural correlates of consciousness) make me want to cheer aloud. The one from Richard Dawkins (http://www.edge.org/response-detail/25366) left me rather nonplussed, unfortunately. I respect Dawkins and even have had the pleasure of meeting him, on which occasion he seemed to be an extremely amiable person willing to give generously of his time and talent to support his colleagues. However, I wish he would read his Plato more carefully before blaming the ills of essentialism on an innocent party. Want to blame Aristotle? Okay. But even then, keep in mind that Aristotle knew about Empedocles' proto-evolutionary views and had sensible reasons to reject them, even though he turned out to be incorrect in hindsight. (Rather amazingly, Empedocles - and Aristotle too, in his criticism of this view - came up with the building blocks of what eventually turned out to be evolutionary theory, so it's not as if natural scientists didn't know about this option.)

Anyway, on to the major bones I wish to pick: Platonist essentialism was never even intended by Plato to apply to the kinds of things to which Dawkins insists it doesn't apply. Indeed, the very examples of error in natural-kind carving that Plato explains in the Statesman consist of artificially separating one kind of persons (e.g. Greeks) out from others, or separating humans from other animals based on the faulty presumption of their uniqueness in possessing rationality! In addition, although various readers interpret Plato's theory of forms differently, most would agree that the question of what sort of thing qualifies as a form is far from easily settled in the dialogues, and the clearest examples fall into the mathematical and abstract category about which Dawkins has no complaint. The vexing difficulty of this issue is also a hot topic of conversation in the Parmenides and several other dialogues. So please, let's not blame "the dead hand of Plato" for some pernicious sort of essentialism.

Furthermore, while Dawkins makes the obvious point that essentialist thinking is out of place in evolutionary theory, his extended examples concerning the beginnings and endings of life and the distinctions between humans and other animal species make very little sense. Given that we're all part of a continuous chain of developing life, and that essentialist boundary-drawing is frequently misleading, must we really follow a slippery slope to concluding that killing a frog is as much "murder" as killing a human? Are no principled distinctions left whatsoever? Someone please tell that to the mule and the hinny, or for that matter, the onion and the garlic! Dawkins argues that if we could abandon essentialism about the human species, "Abortion would no more be "murder" than killing a chimpanzee—or, by extension, any animal. Indeed an early-stage human embryo, with no nervous system and presumably lacking pain and fear, might defensibly be afforded less moral protection than an adult pig, which is clearly well equipped to suffer." Yet here, Dawkins assumes that pain and fear - suffering? - are the essential experiences that can be used to draw moral boundaries around actions. What is the justification for this sort of essentialist thinking? Why are these criteria the only relevant ones to measure value in human or animal experience, and thus the only ones used for moral distinction-making? Why can't we draw other well-justified boundary lines to mark significantly different stages within otherwise continuous processes? [Examples like Marlise Munoz in Texas, kept "alive" despite being in a state of brain death, spring to mind here.] In short, Dawkins relies on a certain sort of essentialism when it suits him, and he also shouldn't automatically reject natural distinctions based on differences in function. Even theorists who suspect the idea of "natural kinds" are willing to allow a great deal more such line-drawing than Dawkins purports to; I would have thought he was familiar with that literature, given how much of it has to do with the theory behind biological taxonomies. However, I won't pretend to understand any of that as well as he does; I do insist that he stop falsely accusing Plato, though, and if someone can tell me why I'm wrong about that I would be glad to see the evidence.
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I'm interested in music, psychology, neuroscience, biology, physics, philosophy, literature, gardening, textiles, animals, cooking, swimming, hiking, and a million other things. The views I express here on G+ do not represent my employer.

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