Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Self-Rescuing Princess Society
2,881 followers -
No damsels in distress here!
No damsels in distress here!

2,881 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Today's the 200th birthday of Bridget "Biddy" Mason, born into slavery on August 15, 1818, in Hancock County, Georgia. But she spent most of her life as a free woman in Los Angeles, California, where she was a leading member of her community.

As a young woman, she was given as a "wedding gift" to John Smith, who moved his new bride and their slaves to Mississippi. He was a missionary in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (although Mormon slave owners were encouraged to free their slaves, he did not), and when the church sent him to California, he took his slaves with him.

California was a free state, and technically all John Smith's slaves were considered free once they entered the state. But they weren't aware of the laws, and John Smith certainly didn't tell them. After four years, though, he was ready to move to Texas and Biddy began to worry that she would be separated from her children, like she'd been taken from her own mother. It was then that she learned of the laws in California, and with the help of some friends, petitioned the court for help. After some shady actions by John Smith, she eventually won her freedom, as well as the freedom for his other slaves.

She remained in Los Angeles for the rest of her life, working as a nurse and midwife. She saved her earnings to used them to purchase land, eventually amassing a small fortune of about $300,000.

She used her wealth to aid local charities addressing the needs of the poor and sick, establish a school for African American children, and found the First African Methodist Episcopal Church of Los Angeles, and then donating the land for its building.

Over the course of her life she went from serving as a slave to serving as a pillar of her community. Through her hard work and dedication to improving the lives of others, she earned the respect of countless citizens, both wealthy and impoverished, and earned a spot in the history of Los Angeles.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
"[Mary G.] Ross, a Cherokee citizen, was born in 1908, excelled in math as a student, and ultimately became the first female engineer at Lockheed Missiles & Space Company. Though much of her work remains classified, she helped develop the conceptual design of the Agena rocket and was a member of teams that sent missions to Mars and Venus."
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
I have been in Louisiana for 3 weeks dealing with a family emergency. It’s been a lot of ups and downs and today was especially stressful. But it’s ending on a positive note and I’m treating myself to a bath and a book. I found this is a box of my sister’s old stuff and I’m going to borrow it for a while.

[Image: paperback book of Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler, on a pink bath towel.]
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
"Stories like Ms. Ginsberg’s are deeply important to me. My Jewish grandparents escaped Nazi Europe, but died before I was old enough to appreciate the stories of what they experienced. And the benefits of cross-generational relationships work both ways: Just as I learned so much from 'Death Metal Grandma,' I know Ms. Ginsberg was energized by our team. Women like her have so much to teach us and are asking for our attention. It’s up to us to listen."
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Huh. I haven't seen any of these. Maybe I'll have to check them out.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Today is also the birthday of the trailblazer Maria Mitchell.

"Does anyone suppose that any woman in all the ages has had a fair chance to show what she could do in science? ... The laws of nature are not discovered by accidents; theories do not come by chance, even to the greatest minds; they are not born of the hurry and worry of daily toil; they are diligently sought, they are patiently waited for, they are received with cautious reserve, they are accepted with reverence and awe. And until able women have given their lives to investigation, it is idle to discuss the question of their capacity for original work."
From "The Need for Women in Science," presented by Maria Mitchell at the 1876 Congress of the AAW (American Association for the Advancement of Women)

Read about her life and work on the SRPS blog: https://selfrescuingprincesssociety.blogspot.com/2017/08/guiding-stars-in-astronomy-maria.html

+ + +

Image: Women in STEM Guiding Stars in Astronomy, Maria Mitchell (August 1, 1818 - June 28, 1889) She was the first woman to work as a professional astronomer in the US. Her discovery of a new comet in 1847, dubbed "Miss Mitchell's Comet," earned her a gold medal from the King of Denmark, and brought her international fame.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Guiding Stars in Astronomy: Helen Sawyer Hogg

Helen Sawyer was a smart young woman who graduated from high school at the age of 15, and went off to Mount Holyoke College at the age of 17. She had originally planned on becoming a chemist, but her career path changed dramatically in her junior year after attending introductory astronomy classes with Dr. Anne Sewell, and then an event with Annie Jump Cannon, the acclaimed astronomer from Harvard. She was inspired by these two women and their love of the stars, and changed her major to astronomy in her junior year. Despite a late arrival to the subject, she graduated magna cum laude in 1926.

She went on to have a long and productive career as an astronomer, working and teaching in Canada. She studied globular clusters and Cepheid variable stars based on the discoveries of Henrietta Swan Leavitt. And she traveled the globe to visit observatories, building an international network of astronomers who shared information.

In the 1970s she expanded her outreach efforts to television and published a widely successful book, The Stars Belong to Everyone, sparking a growing interest in astronomy in the general public.

You can read more about here on the SRPS blog: https://selfrescuingprincesssociety.blogspot.com/2017/08/guiding-stars-in-astronomy-helen-sawyer.html

+ + +

Image: Photo of Helen Sawyer Hogg sitting with a magazine rack behind her. Text reads: Women in STEM, Guiding Stars in Astronomy - Helen Sawyer Hogg (August 1, 1905 - January 28, 1993) Dr. Hogg's career as an astronomer spanned six decades. She discovered 132 new variable stars, and published astronomy catalogues still in use today. She wrote a regular column in the Toronto Star as well as a popular book The Stars Belong to Everyone, sharing her love of astronomy with the general public.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
August 21!!

"In addition to exploring her rich career, the documentary captures more personal moments at home and Betty interacting with close friends, among them a 900-pound grizzly bear (she’s always been a passionate animal advocate). It’s described as being 'packed with hilarious clips from her long career and comments from friends and co-stars, including Valerie Bertinelli, Georgia Engel, Tina Fey, Valerie Harper, Jennifer Love Hewitt, Gavin MacLeod, Carl Reiner, Ryan Reynolds, Tom Sullivan, Alex Trebek and many more.'"
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Badass!

"To dismantle these negative perceptions, Meier started Dirtgirls Camps, where riders interested in off-road biking get practical instruction and navigation experience. The camps are a safe, 'mindf***'-free space for women to ride and learn, and Meier keeps them focused on the possibilities, not on what might go wrong. As participants gain confidence, their riding abilities improve and, for some, the next step is competing and winning."
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Brava Jessica and Lara!
First NASA interns…now NASA astronauts! Jessica Watkins and Loral O’Hara used to be interns at our Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and just recently joined our newest class of astronaut candidates in 2017. Read about their journey: https://go.nasa.gov/2OrLnE8
Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded