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Scholars excited by depiction of actual objects on the body of a 3,000-year-old woman.
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How the club drug ketamine combats depression http://bit.ly/1rUuDcP
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Space-based detector draws interest, but regulatory hurdles might complicate a partnership.
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The £61-million (US$89-million) National Graphene Institute (NGI) at the University of Manchester, UK, has been open for little more than a year. But a parliamentary inquiry into the United Kingdom’s efforts to capitalize on graphene is already putting the institute's progress under scrutiny.
Concerns about the University of Manchester’s National Graphene Institute reflect a broader decline in industrial research and development.
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By thinking that the university is falling to capitalise on their IP, the Government is compounding a fallacy inherited from the previous administration.

I know a bit about the situation an Cambridge, UK, so I'll talk about that. The University made no claim on IP, instead granting it to individual researchers. This was a factor driving invention and cough innovation in Cambridge as those individuals would seek venture capital and start new companies. The University took part in this through St. John's Innovation venture capital fund and other efforts, but they did not claim IP, but rather shares.

The Blair government then required universities to claim IP from research performed on their facilities, and the result of this is extra deadweight with the involvement of another stakeholder. The propertarian model of capitalism overturning the libertarian one.

If the Government desires more British invention and ‘innovation’, they need to stop insisting that universities claim IP, and in fact forbid them from doing so. Instead, those departments that are generating inventors should attract additional funding, paid for out of the additional tax revenue generated through the exploitation of such invention.
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Nine years of censorship. What's it been like to be a government scientist in Canada? http://bit.ly/1QOk7Yv
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A veterinary drug blamed for driving vultures to the brink of extinction on the Indian subcontinent could cause thousands of bird deaths now that it is being used in Spain.
Modelling study paints bleak picture for Europe’s bird populations.
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Did your experiment fail? Don’t bin the data just yet — they could be useful. http://ow.ly/4nqxJl
Machine-learning approach mines unpublished 'dark' reactions that don't work, as well as ones that do.
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Human embryos grown in lab for longer than ever before http://bit.ly/1T1puex
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After a magnitude 7.8 earthquake struck Ecuador in April, a network of citizen scientists sprang into action. http://ow.ly/4nnJvN
Effort to identify damaged areas combines crowdsourcing with machine-learning algorithms.
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Scientists have an audacious plan to save the northern white rhino: transforming cells from living rhinos and frozen storage into sperm and egg cells, and then using IVF to create embryos and revitalize the population. 
Ambitious effort depends on transformation of rhino tissue into sperm and egg cells.
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Zika is a salutary reminder: global preparedness for emerging diseases needs an overhaul. 
Tadataka Yamada, V. Ayano Ogawa and Maria Freire call for research and development funding and coordination to counter global infectious-disease threats.
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Discuss: Why is Sci-Hub so popular?
Data on Sci-Hub activity prompts discussion about why the research-paper website is so popular.
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Because it works.

Because information and knowledge are public goods.

Because it democratises content.

Because much the world cannot afford to pay US/EU/JP/AU prices for content.

Because the research is (often) publicly funded, conducted in public institutions, and meant for the public.

Because information and markets simply don't work. Deadweight losses from restricted access and perverse incentives for publication both taint the system.

Because much the content, EVERYTHING published before 1962, would have been public domain under the copyright law in force at the time, and much up through 1976 and the retrospective extensions of copyright it, and multiple subsequent copyright acts, have created.

Because the interfaces to existing systems, a patchwork fragment of poorly administered, poorly designed, limited-access, and all partial systems are frankly far more tedious to navigate than Sci-Hub: Submit DOI or URL, get paper.

Because what the academic publishing industry calls "theft" the world calls "research".

Because unaffiliated independent research is a thing.

Because the old regime is absolutely unsustainable. It will die. It is dying as we write this.

Because the roles of financing research and publication need not parallel the activity of accessing content. Ronald Coase's "Theory of the Firm" (1937, http://31.184.194.81/http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2308556), a paper which should be public domain today under the law in which it was created and published, and should have been by 1991 at the latest, but isn't, tells us why: transactions themselves have costs.

Because journals no longer serve a primary role as publishers of academic material, but as gatekeepers over academic professional advancement. This perpetrates multiple pathologies: papers don't advance knowledge, academics are blackmailed into the system, and access to knowledge is curtailed

Because 30% profit margins are excessive by any measure. Greed, in this case, is not good.
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Science and technology news and comment from Nature, the international weekly journal of science.