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David Schneider-Joseph
Worked at SpaceX
Attended Greenwood Sudbury School
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David Schneider-Joseph

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If you're a conservative who can't decide between the centrist and the third-world strongman, here's your guy.
The Libertarian Party has picked former New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson as its presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. William Weld as the vice presidential nominee, the most-experienced election ticket in its four-decade history.
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David Schneider-Joseph

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Three in a row.
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It's a beautiful thing.
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Again and again, the man who "tells it like it is" proves his word utterly worthless.
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David Schneider-Joseph

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Between this and the fact that the next Star Trek movie was directed by the guy who did Fast & Furious, Western civilization is in real trouble.
Right-wing parties have been achieving electoral success in a growing number of nations.
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David Schneider-Joseph

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I suggested a few weeks ago that we should vote for Bernie in the Democratic primary since he still had a tiny window through which he might attain the nomination, and a better shot at beating Trump than Hillary.

Whatever window he might have had then (and it was questionable whether it really existed) has clearly closed. It's time to get behind Hillary. She's the candidate, Bernie supporters are largely recognizing this, and the country cannot afford for Trump to be president due to more rancor like what occurred this weekend.

h/t Kathleen Nicole O'Neal for the link.
I've been with him loudly and passionately, but won't be part of destroying this party in the fall
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The only difference is that Obama didn't have to cheat in 2008 to defeat HilLIARy.
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David Schneider-Joseph

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"Regardless of the final outcome, ... the billionaire’s rise offers up a powerful—and frightening—reminder that liberal democracy, even where it’s most entrenched, is a fragile thing. ... The U.S. Constitution includes robust civil-liberties protections, enshrined in the Bill of Rights. But these protections are not unlimited. Contrary to popular belief, majorities—if they’re large enough—can, in fact, do nearly anything they want ... In other words, built-in constraints and constitutional 'guarantees' aren’t enough on their own to preclude illiberal outcomes. What Americans really depend on, then, is a shared political culture and the ideas and ideals that undergird it. As James Fallows notes, 'Liberal democracies like ours depend on rules but also on norms — on the assumption that you’ll go so far, but no further, to advance your political ends.' But all it apparently takes is one man with charisma and an unusually perceptive understanding of the human psyche to change that. There are norms against politicians suggesting that minorities should have special identification cards. There are norms against saying you want to kill the families of terrorists. There are norms against encouraging your supporters to use violence against their political opponents. It’s not entirely clear why you don’t do or say these things (because Trump clearly has), but you just don’t. The very fact that Trump has made such frightening comments on national television—without any corresponding 'disqualification' or decline in popular support—has already undermined these longstanding norms.

... Kutz calls the spread of global norms against torture 'one of the most impressive successes of the post-war period.' Yet, in the United States, these norms began to erode after the attacks of September 11th. Soon enough, torture—or what some were now euphemistically calling 'enhanced interrogation'—came to enjoy broad support among the American public. The lesson again is clear. However strong they may first appear, norms, particularly those relating to national security, are more fragile than we might like to think. Once their sanctity is undermined by authority figures (whether presidents or presidential candidates), others can judge that what was once considered shameful is now not just socially tolerated but also necessary, good, and just. This is why 'political correctness'—even if it seems irritating and is sometimes abused to restrict reasonable debate—still represents a public good: It makes us think twice about saying things that might contribute to the erosion of liberal and democratic norms.

We have now reached a point where current or former presidential candidates from both parties have flirted with the idea of internment camps ... No less than Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia believed that it could happen here. On this, he is on strong ground, since it has, of course, already happened. In 1944, the Supreme Court upheld Roosevelt’s internment of Japanese-Americans in Korematsu v. United States. While Scalia said that the decision was 'wrong,' he also issued a warning in his blunt style: 'You are kidding yourself if you think the same thing will not happen again.'

The norm against internment has been undermined, even though Americans do not face anything close to the threat presented by the Nazis and Japan during World War II. Which raises the question of what a plurality, or even a majority, of Americans might be willing to support if they had to confront a threat that was truly existential. We Americans are not, today, at war, at least not in the normal sense. I hope to God that we never will be again. But we might be. And this is where Scalia’s words that day were perhaps most chilling, in part because he was right. Evoking the Latin expression inter arma enim silent leges, he reminded the audience that 'in times of war, the laws fall silent.' All we will have then are the things we still believe in—our norm. But, by then, they might not be enough."
The candidate has exposed in America the tension between elections and values—just like the Arab Spring did.
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What I find odd here is the suggestion that we had an anti-racist norm at some point!? Seems like golden age thinking. As they say (while weirdly not letting it impact their golden age thinking) there was internment not long ago. For some reason they constantly apologize for that but never mention US eugenics, which was about the same time, zillions of people sterilized and such. Then after that was the civil rights struggle, black people literally lynched, the government openly at war with a small group of black people for daring to provide student lunches, MLK and his allies not yet "honored" with misquotes on statues but still being beaten in the streets, etc. Then comes mass incarceration of black and brown people such that there are more black men currently under the control of the criminal bureaucratic-processing system than were enslaved during chattel slavery. I literally see no difference in Trump's racism and even the immediately preceding racism, except perhaps that it's a bit more dickish and more firmly centers Muslims as an Other.
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David Schneider-Joseph

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Alice Ollstein: “I’ve been reporting in Washington, DC for six years, and this is the only time it’s ever happened to me — either in person or online.”

Bryce Covert: “I haven’t gotten any anti-semitism in my mentions for writing about any other candidate.”

“The growing culture of hate shows few signs of slowing down, and reporters are increasingly concerned the vitriol won’t stop so long as Trump refuses to condemn the attacks — and stop attacking reporters himself.”
“The Trump supporters had to really dig deep to figure out that I’m Jewish.”
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But it's okay because Trump Tower has the best matzo ball soup.
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David Schneider-Joseph

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"On February 7, Donald Trump told an audience of supporters in New Hampshire that he would represent their interests, but Jeb Bush would not, because Bush was in the pocket of special interests. Trump singled out Woody Johnson, the heir to a pharmaceutical fortune ... 'So tell me, let me ask you: Do you think Jeb Bush is going to make drug prices competitive?'

This week Trump announced that Johnson would serve as vice-chair of the Trump Victory Fund. 'He’s a terrific guy, he’s been a friend of mine a long time,' Trump announced. ... the very man Trump had held up as the embodiment of corruption, and whose funds he pledged never to accept, would now take a prominent role as a Trump fund-raiser.

... His contempt for objective truth is the rejection of democratic accountability, an implicit demand that his supporters place undying faith in him. Because the only measure of truth he accepts is what he claims at any given moment, the power his supporters vest in him is unlimited.

... The normal rules of political lying hold that when the lie has been exposed, or certainly when it has been confessed, the jig is up. You have to stop lying about it and tell the truth, or at least retreat to a different lie. Trump bends the rules of the universe to his own will, at no apparent cost. His brazenness is another utterly unique characteristic. His confidence that he can make the truth whatever he wishes at any moment, and toggle back and forth between incompatible realities at will, without any cost to himself, is a display of dominance. Possibly Trump’s most important statement of the campaign was his idle boast that he could shoot somebody on Fifth Avenue without losing any votes.

... Finally, there is Trump’s habit of settling all disputes with his own peculiar form of ad hominem. He dismisses all criticisms of his statements and his record with an array of put-downs, and likewise confirms all endorsements with praise. Anybody who disagrees with Trump is ugly, short, corrupt, a loser, a habitual liar, a total joke, and so forth. People who support him are smart, beautiful, fair, esteemed, etc. But politics being as it is — and, especially, Trump’s positions being as fluid as they are — the composition of the two categories is in constant flux. One day, you are a failing, ridiculous, deranged liar, and the next day a citizen of the highest regard. ... This is the pattern Trump uses to dismiss all media criticism, or to amplify friendly coverage. Every reporter or publication is either pathetic and failing or fair and wonderful, and the same reporters and publications can be reclassified as one or the other as Trump sees fit.

... Truth and reason are weapons of the powerless against the powerful. There is no external doctrine he can be measured against, not even conservative dogma, which he embraces or discards at will and with no recognition of having done so. Trump’s version of truth is multiple truths, the only consistent element of which is Trump himself is always, by definition, correct. Trump’s mind is so difficult to grapple with because it is an authoritarian epistemology that lies outside the democratic norms that have shaped all of our collective experiences."
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David Schneider-Joseph

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Quintessential Donald Trump: "You've been hearing me say that it's a rigged system but now I don't say it anymore because I won. Okay? It's true. You know, now I don't care."

If there's any one quote that best summarizes his worldview, it's this one. Rules don't matter, except to the extent that they can be used by the strong to crush the weak.
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Hopefully they'll consider superdelegates in 2020.
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A man who wore the cornflower, a Nazi symbol from the 1930's, came just 31,000 votes short of becoming Austria's next president.
Alexander Van der Bellen is elected Austria's president, as Norbert Hofer narrowly fails in his bid to become the EU's first far-right head of state.
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i guess it's time for him to move to germany.
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We don’t hear as much as we should from and about trans men. This article examines the before and after of transition, with emphasis on their experience of sexism. On the up side, you’re taken way more seriously as a man — there’s a much higher presumption from others of competence, and less demand for superficial beauty. The downside: greatly heightened fear of you and your interactions with women and children, especially if you’re black; and new social barriers to friendship with other men.
Men who were once perceived as women know what it's like on both sides
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Work
Employment
  • SpaceX
    Flight Software Development Engineer, 2012 - 2014
    Ran the telemetry database for a while. Then worked on GNC flight software.
  • Google
    Software Engineer / Site Reliability Engineer, 2010 - 2012
  • Amazon.com
    Software Development Engineer, EC2, 2009 - 2010
  • Mountain Laurel Sudbury School
    Staff Member, 2004 - 2009
  • Going.com
    Software Engineer, 2006 - 2008
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Introduction
Interests: space colonization, Go (the board game), Lisp, AI, economics, non-coercive education, bitcoin, free speech.

Heroes: A.S. Neill, A.M. Turing, R.P. Feynman, S.P. Jobs.
Education
  • Greenwood Sudbury School
    2002 - 2003
  • Sudbury Valley School
    1999 - 2000
  • Commonwealth School
    1998 - 1999