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With students’ futures in mind, the College of Public Health and Human Sciences is enhancing its career readiness initiatives by creating a position focused on student success after graduation.

Joanna Abbott will begin the newly created role of career consultant this winter, where she will work directly with all CPHHS undergraduates, MPH and PhD students.

“I want every student feeling confident and well-prepared to pursue their career of choice,” she says.

With a background in career development, social work and public administration, Joanna has a good understanding of the opportunities and challenges facing CPHHS students pursuing a wide variety of careers.
With students’ futures in mind, the College of Public Health and Human Sciences is enhancing its career readiness initiatives by creating a position focused on student success after graduation.
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Arsenic exposure and the seroprevalence of total hepatitis A antibodies in the US population: NHANES, 2003–2012

Abstract

We evaluated the association between urinary arsenic and the seroprevalence of total hepatitis A antibodies (total anti-HAV: IgG and IgM) in 11 092 participants aged ≥6 years using information collected in the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2003–2012). Multivariate logistic regression models evaluated associations between total anti-HAV and total urinary arsenic defined as the sum of arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonate and dimethylarsinate (TUA1). Effect modification by self-reported HAV immunization status was evaluated. Total anti-HAV seroprevalence was 35·1% [95% confidence interval (CI) 33·3–36·9]. Seropositive status was associated with higher arsenic levels and this association was modified by immunization status (P = 0·03). For participants that received ≥2 vaccine doses or did not know if they had received any doses, a positive dose-response association was observed between increasing TUA1 and odds of total anti-HAV [odds ratio (OR) 1·42, 95% CI 1·11–1·81; and OR 1·75, 95% CI 1·22–2·52], respectively. A positive but not statistically significant association was observed in those who received <2 doses (OR 1·46, 95% CI 0·83–2·59) or no dose (OR 1·12, 95% CI 0·98–1·30). Our analysis indicates that prevalent arsenic exposure was associated with positive total anti-HAV seroprevalence. Further studies are needed to determine if arsenic increases the risk for incident hepatitis A infection or HAV seroconversion.
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Study: Control, Norms, and Attitudes - Differences Between Students Who Do and Do Not Intervene as Bystanders to Sexual Assault

Abstract

Sexual assault is a major concern on the U.S. college campus. Engaging students as pro-social bystanders has become more common as a potentially effective mechanism for reducing the incidence of sexual assault and mitigating the harm of assaults that have already occurred. Understanding the influences of pro-social bystander behavior is imperative to developing effective programs, and the use of an evidence-based theoretical framework can help identify the differences between students who intervene and those who do not when presented with the opportunity. A sample of 815 undergraduate university students completed the Sexual Assault Bystander Behavior Questionnaire, a survey based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) that investigates students’ perceived behavioral control to intervene, subjective norms that support intervening, attitudes toward intervening, and intent to intervene in the future. Two-tailed t tests revealed interveners reported significantly greater perceived behavioral control than non-interveners for eight of the 12 intervention behaviors, more supportive subjective norms than non-interveners for seven of the 12 intervention behaviors, more positive attitudes than non-interveners for only one of the 12 intervention behaviors, and greater intent to intervene in the future for six of the 12 intervention behaviors. Differences in the four TPB variables were not consistent for the 12 intervention behaviors. The use of a theoretical framework found to be effective in explaining—and changing—other health-related behaviors, and the inquiry into students’ opportunities to intervene to compare against their reported intervention behaviors, is new to this body of literature and contributes to the understanding of the influences of pro-social bystander behavior. 
Abstract Sexual assault is a major concern on the U.S. college campus. Engaging students as pro-social bystanders has become more common as a potentially effective mechanism for reducing the incidence of sexual assault and mitigating the harm of assaults that have already occurred. Understanding the influences of pro-social bystander behavior is imperative to developing effective programs, and the use of an evidence-based theoretical framework ca...
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The OSUDI has an emphasis in community dietetics, which was important to me since that is the area of nutrition I am most passionate about. Additionally, the rotations available through the OSUDI seemed very interesting and were unique from most other DI programs.

The Oregon State University Dietetic Internship is one of only a few dietetic internships where interns work with the Affordable Care Act in patient centered medical homes working with a team of care providers in primary care clinics.

#dietetics #eatright #nutrition
“It is so rewarding to feel as though I’ve made a difference, even if small, in my patients’ lives,” says Oregon State University Dietetic Internship intern Paige Becker, who is the recipient of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Scholarship. “This is my favorite aspect of the internship thus far."
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The goal for IGERTs has been to train ‘T-shaped scientists’ – that is, scientists with deeply specialized knowledge in their primary area paired with broad knowledge in a number of relevant disciplines.

Our IGERT on Aging Sciences is the first and only IGERT to have aging as its thematic focus. Aging is inherently interdisciplinary – which makes it a relevant and important domain in which to train IGERT students.
The CPHHS’ IGERT (Integrative Graduate Education, Research and Training) on Aging Sciences doctoral training program educates PhD students about global challenges in the world for which interdisciplinary approaches are necessary, creating top-notch researchers who make a difference in the field of aging.
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Thanks to faculty Laurel Kincl and Viktor Bovbjerg, PhD student Laura Syron and alumni Devin Lucas for their work to keep coastal communities safe and productive.

Commercial Dungeness crab fishing on the West Coast is one of the highest risk occupations in the United States, based on fatality rates. But non-fatal injuries in the fishery appear to go largely unreported, a new study from Oregon State University shows.

While the fatality rates in the Dungeness crab fleet have been reported in the past, the incidence of non-fatal injuries have not been previously studied, said Laurel Kincl, an assistant professor of environmental and occupational health and safety in the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences.

“The commercial Dungeness fishing fleet, which operates along the coast of Oregon, Washington and Northern California, is a vital economic commodity,” she said. “Injuries can be life-threatening and life-altering, leading to disability, decreased quality of life and lost wages.”

Understanding the type and nature of fatalities and injuries, including describing and categorizing the types of injuries, is the first step in identifying safety issues and pinpointing areas for prevention, she said.
Injuries can be life-threatening and life-altering, leading to disability, decreased quality of life and lost wages.
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“The findings suggest that water birth is a reasonably safe, low-intervention option for women who face a low risk of complications during the birthing process,” Bovbjerg said. “These are decisions that should be made in concert with a medical professional.”

#waterbirth


water birth babies were no more likely to have low Apgar scores or require transfer to the hospital; nor be hospitalized in first six weeks of life, than newborns who were not born in water.
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Study: Maternal and Newborn Outcomes Following Waterbirth: The Midwives Alliance of North America Statistics Project, 2004 to 2009 Cohort

Introduction
Data on the safety of waterbirth in the United States are lacking.

Methods
We used data from the Midwives Alliance of North America Statistics Project, birth years 2004 to 2009. We compared outcomes of neonates born underwater waterbirth (n = 6534), neonates not born underwater nonwaterbirth (n = 10,290), and neonates whose mothers intended a waterbirth but did not have one intended waterbirth (n = 1573). Neonatal outcomes included a 5-minute Apgar score of less than 7, neonatal hospital transfer, and hospitalization or neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission in the first 6 weeks. Maternal outcomes included genital tract trauma, postpartum hospital transfer, and hospitalization or infection (uterine, endometrial, perineal) in the first 6 weeks. We used logistic regression for all analyses, controlling for primiparity.

Results
Waterbirth neonates experienced fewer negative outcomes than nonwaterbirth neonates: the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for hospital transfer was 0.46 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.32-0.68; P < .001); the aOR for infant hospitalization in the first 6 weeks was 0.75 (95% CI, 0.63-0.88; P < .001); and the aOR for NICU admission was 0.59 (95% CI, 0.46-0.76; P < .001). By comparison, neonates in the intended waterbirth group experienced more negative outcomes than the nonwaterbirth group, although only 5-minute Apgar score was significant (aOR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.40-2.93; P < 0001). For women, waterbirth (compared to nonwaterbirth) was associated with fewer postpartum transfers (aOR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.50-0.84; P = .001) and hospitalizations in the first 6 weeks (aOR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.59-0.87; P < 0.001) but with an increased odds of genital tract trauma (aOR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.04-1.18; P = .002). Waterbirth was not associated with maternal infection. Women in the intended waterbirth group had increased odds for all maternal outcomes compared to women in the nonwaterbirth group, although only genital tract trauma was significant (aOR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.49-1.87; P < .001).

Discussion
Waterbirth confers no additional risk to neonates; however, waterbirth may be associated with increased risk of genital tract trauma for women.
How to Cite. Bovbjerg, M. L., Cheyney, M. and Everson, C. (2016), Maternal and Newborn Outcomes Following Waterbirth: The Midwives Alliance of North America Statistics Project, 2004 to 2009 Cohort. Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health. doi: 10.1111/jmwh.12394 ...
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Coconut oil has been proclaimed as the new miracle food. Not only is it said to cure Alzheimer’s and decrease the risk of heart disease, it can whiten teeth and moisturize your hair too. A single jar sitting in the cupboard is seen as the solution to all nutrition and beauty problems. But is this too good to be true?
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Liver damage caused by the typical “Western diet” – one high in fat, sugar and cholesterol that’s common in developed countries such as the United States – may be difficult to reverse even if diet is generally improved, says CPHHS researchers.

The research, published in PLOS ONE, found that a diet with reduced fat and cholesterol helped, but did not fully resolve liver damage that had already been done – damage that in turn can lead to more serious health problems, such as cirrhosis or even cancer.

This study, done with laboratory animals, showed that diets low in fat and cholesterol could in fact aid with weight loss, improved metabolism and health. But even then, if the diet was still high in sugar there was much less liver recovery.

#nutrition #eatright
The findings are significant, researchers say, because liver problems such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease are surging in the United States
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Thinking of picking up a fitness DVD to kick-start your New Year's Resolution to a healthier you? Read on to learn why that may not be a good idea.

For instance, one of every seven motivational statements was considered negative. Do your fitness videos include similar statements?
Fitness DVDs may seem like a good way to meet your exercise goals, but they may also include negative imagery and demotivating language.
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For College of Public Health and Human Sciences alumna Julee Christianson, MPH ’14, it took a few years in the MPH program at Oregon State to find her passion. And now she’s turned that passion into a job that will undoubtedly improve the lives of others.

“Once I realized my passion for substance abuse prevention, I started focusing my classroom projects on the topic, such as a Twitter campaign to increase doctors using SBIRT (Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment),” Julee says. “My final oral exam presentation was an alcohol abuse prevention plan using the Strategic Prevention Framework. The opportunity at the CPHHS to choose topics really helped me development my understanding of prevention science and interventions.”
For CPHHS alumna Julee Christianson, MPH ’14, it took a few years in the MPH program at Oregon State to find her passion. And now she’s turned that passion into a job that will undoubtedly improve the lives of others.
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Contact Information
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541-737-3220
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College of Public Health and Human Sciences Oregon State University 160 NW 26th St. Corvallis, OR 97331-8577
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Lifelong health and well-being for every person, every family, every community.
Introduction

Lifelong health and well-being for every person, every family and every community guides the work of our distinguished faculty and extraordinary students. We are responding to the most challenging public health issues facing us today, focusing on prevention strategies to promote health across the lifespan, from healthy children to healthy aging. We are teaching, conducting pioneering research and delivering outreach programs that address optimal nutrition for health, overcoming poverty and hunger, changing inactive lifestyles, improving the lives of children and older adults at-risk, preventing disease, addressing public policy and access to healthcare, and maximizing environmentally friendly materials and structures. 

Inspired by our mission as a leading land-grant university, we create synergy in teaching, research, and outreach to develop the next generation of globally minded public health and human sciences professionals. Through interdisciplinary research and innovative curricula, we advance knowledge, policies and practices that improve population health in communities across Oregon and beyond.