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Janet Chase Harper proves that you can be fit at any age. The 97-year-old CPHHS alumna (’41 home economics) is still mentally sharp and fit as a fiddle. After breaking her femur and having surgery two years ago, the Junction City resident rides a three-wheeled tricycle each day on the farm she lives on independently.
Janet Chase Harper proves that you can be fit at any age. The 97-year-old CPHHS alumna (’41 home economics) is still mentally sharp and fit as a fiddle. After breaking her femur and having surgery two years ago, the Junction City resident rides a three-wheeled tricycle each day on the farm she lives on independently.
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The TEAM OREGON Motorcycle Safety Program provides statewide training, education and outreach for riders of all levels of experience and riding ability.

TEAM OREGON is a nationally recognized leader in motorcycle safety and the only state motorcycle safety program to develop its own proprietary training curricula.

“We face many new and exciting challenges in the field of motorcycle training,” Aria says. “As director of the premier motorcycle education program in the nation, what excites me most is that we – TEAM OREGON and OSU – have all the right tools and resources to solve some of the most perplexing issues facing us. I’m also excited to be able to meet the growing demand for training throughout Oregon and to know that no one else can match what we offer.”


Much like the constant excitement and challenges motorcyclists face, Aria Minu-Sepehr will experience similar sentiments during his new role as director of the TEAM OREGON Motorcycle Safety Program. With 20 years of experience in education and management, Aria assumes his new role after serving as the organization’s training manager.
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The spring term is about to end and that means commencement is right around the corner. Over one thousand undergraduate and graduate students will receive degrees from our college and many of them will walk at the commencement ceremony next week.

I always found it odd that we use the word commencement – from the word commence or to start – to celebrate the completion of someone’s academic program. But, perhaps it’s fitting. Although their structured academic pursuits may be completed, so much of our graduates’ lives are only starting to commence following graduation. As they begin their next journey in their careers or further their academic pursuits, we count these 1,000+ graduates as new alumni. Congratulations class of 2016!

I always found it odd that we use the word commencement – from the word commence or to start – to celebrate the completion of someone’s academic program. But, perhaps it’s fitting. Although their structured academic pursuits may be completed, so much of our graduates’ lives are only starting to commence following graduation. As they begin their next journey in their careers or further their academic pursuits, we count these 1,000+ graduates as ne...
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The college held its first “Ovation” event May 1 to recognize an outstanding alumnus, preceptor and supporter and to show appreciation for the many people who support its students.
The college held its first “Ovation” event May 1 to recognize an outstanding alumnus, preceptor and supporter and to show appreciation for the many people who support its students.
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CPHHS students and incarcerated youth find similarities, support during community service project

Assistant Professor Leslie Richard’s Families in Poverty has inspired Tasha Galardi, a PhD student in Human Development and Family Studies, more than once. She was first motivated to consider the HDFS program as a graduate student after completing the course in 2009. Leslie served as her master’s thesis advisor when she did enroll in the program. Tasha’s since taught the class online and recently led a unique community service project with current students.

Prior to the spring term, Tasha presented Leslie with the idea of leading a group of students in a community service project at the all-female Oak Creek Youth Correctional Facility in Albany. Students in the class are required to complete a service project that involves 20 hours of engagement. Leslie was supportive and enthusiastic, and after receiving the green light Tasha worked with 10 students to supervise the project from planning to fruition.

“I wanted it to be completely collaborative. I didn’t want it to be OSU students teaching Oak Creek girls,” Tasha says. “I wanted it to be that they were all learning together and breaking down any barriers or differences and that they were really in a group experience.”

Tasha says she was hoping for the students and incarcerated girls – ages 13-21 ­– to see how alike they were as they got to know each other on an equal playing field. She says the group found they had many similarities and that a handful of the incarcerated young women are thinking about their futures, including college.
Tasha says she was hoping for the students and incarcerated girls – ages 13-21 ­– to see how alike they were as they got to know each other on an equal playing field. She says the group found they had many similarities and that a handful of the incarcerated young women are thinking about their futures, including college.
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This program is offered to undergraduate students pursuing a major or minor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences or in a related discipline, who have an OSU GPA of 2.5 or greater.

Course Title(s):
H225, Individual and Social Determinants of Health (4 cr.)
H333, Global Health (3 cr.)
H401 Research and Scholarship (2 cr.)

All students will be housed at Green Path Guest House, which is closely located to the SWASTI building where classes are held. The accommodations are safe, convenient to public transportation and offer modern conveniences.

Participants will work in close collaboration with SWASTI: Health Resource Centre in Bangalore. The College of Public Health and Human Science’s existing partnership with SWASTI will help facilitate student excursions to communities in and around Bangalore for experiential learning. It will also provide an opportunity for students to integrate classroom learning with hands-on community-based activities.
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Last week, the College of Public Health and Human Sciences celebrated its newest alumni with a graduation reception for college graduates and their families and a hooding ceremony for graduate students. More than 400 attended the reception and more than 200 the hooding ceremony.

To all our graduates, best of luck on your individual journeys. Whether you plan to start work, continue your educational pursuits or take a well-deserved break, we are excited to see how you contribute to improving the health and well-being of people, families and communities. We thank you in advance for completing our short surveys; your insights help us to improve programs and better serve our alumni. You are the future of public health and we salute you!

Please keep in touch and stay connected. If you are interested in learning about the many ways alumni can volunteer with the college – from mentoring current students to participating in panel discussions – please contact our College Alumni Relations Director, Veronica Royce.
http://health.oregonstate.edu/people/royce-veronica

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On his first day in California’s Pelican Bay State Prison in 1997, Christopher McFarland noticed a bald, middle-aged inmate with a swastika carved into his forehead. It was Charles Manson, one of America’s most notorious mass murderers.

During his first week inside, he saw eight men get stabbed and one man get shot.

To avoid getting shanked himself, he learned to stuff books down the front and back of his pants and never to leave his cell without a homie to watch his back.

And he made himself a promise.

“I am not f---ing coming back here,” he told himself. “I need to change my ways — now!”

And that’s exactly what he did.

McFarland kicked his intravenous drug habit at Pelican Bay, despite plenty of opportunities to continue using, and after serving 3½ years of a seven-year sentence for grand theft auto and transportation of marijuana, he got out of prison and got busy reconstructing his life.

He complied with the terms of his parole. He got a job. He stayed off drugs. He reconnected with his kids, who by then were living in Philomath, and moved to Oregon. He got his GED. He continued his education, first at Linn-Benton Community College, then at Oregon State University.

And on Saturday, he will graduate from OSU with a master’s degree in public health.
On his first day in California’s Pelican Bay State Prison in 1997, Christopher McFarland noticed a bald, middle-aged inmate with a swastika carved into his forehead. It was Charles Manson,
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CPHHS Assistant Professor Stephanie Grutzmacher recently hosted a delegation of four from Debre Berhan University.

Among the areas the delegation wanted to explore with OSU faculty and staff were building administrative infrastructure for research, service and academic programs; program planning and evaluation; development of graduate programs and research initiatives; and building capacity for community engagement. The group was busy during its two days at OSU. Meetings, meals, course observations, off-campus site visits and personal visits with key leadership and students filled their agenda.

“Our experience visiting OSU was multidimensional,” Teferi says. “We were exposed to OSU’s strategies and systems to address our shared missions of teaching and learning, research and community services. We were very impressed with OSU’s approach to outreach, which engages professionals on campus and in the community and utilizes volunteers to expand reach with limited resources.”
You may not think faculty from OSU’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences and Debre Berhan University in Ethiopia have much in common. On the contrary, they share something they both hold dear ­– a passion and commitment to better the health of their communities.
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Laurel Kincl loves to run and eat dark chocolate. When she isn’t teaching a course to School of Biological and Population Health Sciences students or working on one of her research projects, the assistant professor is most likely running. She runs up to five times each week and plans longer runs for the weekend. On weekends, you’ll find her with her social running group somewhere in McDonald Forest.
Laurel Kincl loves to run and eat dark chocolate. When she isn’t teaching a course to School of Biological and Population Health Sciences students or working on one of her research projects, the assistant professor is most likely running. She runs up to five times each week and plans longer runs for the weekend. On weekends, you’ll find her with her social running group somewhere in McDonald Forest.
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Daily Smoking and Subjective Health Complaints in Adolescence


Abstract

Introduction: Using data from the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey, this study used a repeated cross-sectional design to examine associations between daily smoking, gender, and self-reported health complaints in five cohorts of adolescents over a 16-year period.

Methods: Data were from nationally representative cohorts of 15-year-old youth in Norway in 1993/94, 1997/98, 2001/02, 2005/06, and 2009/10 (ntotal=7,761). Dependent variables were psychological, somatic, and total health complaints. A mixed GLM model examined main and interaction effects of smoking (daily, intermittent, nonsmoking), year, and gender in predicting complaints. Time periods were segmented to compare trends across smoking groups in specific periods.

Results: Prevalence of daily smoking declined from 15.5% (1993/94) to 6.0% (2009/10). All health complaint scores were significantly higher for smokers and for girls (vs. boys). Smoking status by year interactions were significant for all complaint variables during the period of sharpest decline of daily smoking prevalence (2001/02-2005/06), with daily smokers experiencing increases in health complaints while intermittent and nonsmokers did not. Smoking status by gender interactions were significant for all health complaint variables, indicating that the main effect for gender (females higher) was even stronger among smokers compared to nonsmokers. Using year as unit of analysis, the size of mean differences between smokers and intermittent/nonsmokers in total complaints was significantly negatively correlated with daily smoking prevalence (-.963, n=5, p<.001).

Conclusions: As prevalence of daily smoking declined, daily smokers reported higher levels of complaints, suggesting increasing health problems within this group. Girls who smoke daily had particularly elevated levels of complaints.

Implications: what this study adds This study indicates that the relationship between daily smoking and concurrent health symptomatology in adolescents is changing over time, with higher levels of health complaints reported as overall smoking prevalence declines. To our knowledge, this finding has not previously been reported. If youth are smoking to cope with distress, pain, or other health concerns, tobacco control objectives will be increasingly difficult to achieve with adolescents. Levels of health complaints are particularly high among girls who are daily smokers. The findings suggest that restrictive measures and persuasive communications may not be sufficient tobacco prevention strategies for adolescent populations. Young smokers may need counseling and support.
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The USA faces disproportionate and increasing HIV incidence rates among Black men who have sex with men (BMSM). New biomedical technologies such as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) have been developed to address their HIV risk.

Very little consideration, however, has been given to the diversity obscured by 'BMSM' as a category, to how this diversity relates to men's sexual partnering strategies, or to the relevance of these issues for new HIV prevention methods.

We conducted a community-based ethnography from June 2013 to May 2014 documenting factors that affect the acceptance of and adherence to PrEP among BMSM. We conducted in-depth interviews with 31 BMSM and 17 community stakeholders, and participant observation.

To demonstrate the diversity of social identities, we present a taxonomy of indigenous categories organized along the axes of sexual identity, sexual positioning, and gender performance. We analyse how HIV prevention strategies, such as PrEP, may be more effective if programmes consider how gender, sexuality, and sexual desire shape sexual partnering strategies.

This article underlines the importance of attending to the diversity of sexual and social subjectivities among BMSM, of bringing the study of sexuality back into HIV prevention, and of integrating biomedical prevention approaches into community-based programmes.
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College of Public Health and Human Sciences Oregon State University 160 NW 26th St. Corvallis, OR 97331-8577
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Lifelong health and well-being for every person, every family, every community.
Introduction

Lifelong health and well-being for every person, every family and every community guides the work of our distinguished faculty and extraordinary students. We are responding to the most challenging public health issues facing us today, focusing on prevention strategies to promote health across the lifespan, from healthy children to healthy aging. We are teaching, conducting pioneering research and delivering outreach programs that address optimal nutrition for health, overcoming poverty and hunger, changing inactive lifestyles, improving the lives of children and older adults at-risk, preventing disease, addressing public policy and access to healthcare, and maximizing environmentally friendly materials and structures. 

Inspired by our mission as a leading land-grant university, we create synergy in teaching, research, and outreach to develop the next generation of globally minded public health and human sciences professionals. Through interdisciplinary research and innovative curricula, we advance knowledge, policies and practices that improve population health in communities across Oregon and beyond.