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College of Public Health and Human Sciences
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Today’s children are tomorrow’s future, and as parents or caregivers it’s our job to influence their growth and development from day one through reliable, responsive and sensitive parenting.

Join us. Register today. Early bird rate until midnight April 27
The 2015 Oregon Parenting Educators’ Conference, held 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Monday, May 11, at LaSells Stewart Center, will offer professionals who work with children and families the opportunity to advance their skills and network with fellow parenting leaders through a comprehensive event including more than 30 workshops and a keynote address by New York Times best-selling author and parenting expert Tina Payne Bryson, PhD.
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In 2013-14, more than 1.7 million students competed in high school soccer and basketball in the United States. During that period, about 335,000 of the athletes had a lower extremity injury that required medical attention and kept them from participating for at least one day.
#publichealth   #injuryprevention   #AthleticTraining  
Injury prevention programs can help reduce ankle, knee and other lower extremity injuries in sports, but the programs are not being widely used in high schools, a new study from Oregon State University has found.
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What does Debbie Jensen enjoy most about her job? Take a look!
"I’ve seen thousands of new students come through the orientations, and then down the road I congratulate them at the line up for graduation every June. It’s a beautiful feeling of accomplishment for them and the advising office!" says PHHS Academic Advising Office Manager Debbie Jensen.
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“You can’t build a house without the necessary materials,” Traber said. “In a sense, if vitamin E is inadequate, we’re cutting by more than half the amount of materials with which we can build and maintain the brain.”

Vitamin E in human diets is most often provided by dietary oils, such as olive oil. But many of the highest levels are in foods not routinely considered dietary staples – almonds, sunflower seeds or avocados.

#eatright   #vitamine  
Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered how vitamin E deficiency may cause neurological damage by interrupting a supply line of specific nutrients and robbing the brain of the “building blocks” it needs to maintain neuronal health.
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What was the one specific moment that inspired Associate Professor JoonKoo (JK) Yun's career path?

“When I came to the United States, I did not know much about working with people with disability and I was much more interested in physiological responses among elite athletics. It is embarrassing to say that I took my first adapted physical activity course because of convenience rather than topic, but the course changed my view and direction. Dr. Grove lectured about the importance of providing opportunities to individuals who otherwise would not participate in physical activity. We need to provide and advocate physical activity opportunities to all individuals.”

Read the full interview
http://synergies.oregonstate.edu/2015/inside-the-mind-of-researcher-jk-yun/

#disability   #publichealth   #adaptivephysicalactivity  
"Investigating the mechanisms of human behavior change, specifically those mechanisms that promote physical activity and inclusion for individuals with disabilities, will help to create effective intervention services to promote physical activity for individuals with disability," says Associate Professor JK Yun.
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There are immense medical benefits to exercise, yet medical schools aren't instructing US doctors on how to utilize exercise to benefit their patients.
Exercise may play a critical role in maintaining good health, but fewer than half of the physicians trained in the United States in 2013 received formal education or training on the subject, according to new research from Oregon State University.
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Objectives. We examined biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure among Native Hawaiians, Filipinos, and Whites, groups that have different lung cancer risk.

Methods. We collected survey data and height, weight, saliva, and carbon monoxide (CO) levels from a sample of daily smokers aged 18–35 (n = 179). Mean measures of nicotine, cotinine, cotinine/cigarettes per day ratio, trans 3′ hydroxycotinine, the nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR), and expired CO were compared among racial/ethnic groups.

Results. The geometric means for cotinine, the cotinine/cigarettes per day ratio, and CO did not significantly differ among racial/ethnic groups in the adjusted models. After adjusting for gender, body mass index, menthol smoking, Hispanic ethnicity, and number of cigarettes smoked per day, the NMR was significantly higher among Whites than among Native Hawaiians and Filipinos (NMR = 0.33, 0.20, 0.19, P ≤ .001). The NMR increased with increasing White parental ancestry. The NMR was not significantly correlated with social–environmental stressors.

Conclusions. Racial/ethnic groups with higher rates of lung cancer had slower nicotine metabolism than Whites. The complex relationship between lung cancer risk and nicotine metabolism among racial/ethnic groups needs further clarification. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print April 16, 2015: e1–e9. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2014.302492)

Read More: http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/10.2105/AJPH.2014.302492
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“In order to create a healthy nation, we must start somewhere,” Melissa says. “By increasing awareness and knowledge, we are contributing to a healthier nation. It’s best to start locally, and since we are part of the OSU community, it was important for us to start right here.”
#NPHW   #HealthiestNation  
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150 CPHHS undergrads earned scholarships from the college this year. Join us in congratulating all of them - and be sure to add a few Instagram & Twitter likes to those that posted their happy dances.

(well - maybe not all of them are actual dances, but still ;-)
Well, you’re awesome. You even got a financial award for all that awesomeness, and we know you want to tell the world. Or at least your best friends. This is how we’re celebrating you and helping you shout your success from the roof tops (The college does not condone actual shouting from roof tops ;-)
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Learning how to care for one’s body and mind through resources, tips or exercises will help them be fit for the long run, making the nation healthier one person at a time.
Join the OSU Public Health Club tomorrow to see how.
#publichealth   #NPHW  
Join the College of Public Health and Human Sciences’ Public Health Club from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. Wednesday, April 8, at the MU Plaza – east of the MU – to learn from local health professionals how to maintain a healthy lifestyle.
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Rep. Peter DeFazio said the event held a close place in his heart, as he gained his M.A. in public administration and gerontology at University of Oregon. DeFazio went on to work as a gerontologist before becoming a U.S. Representative.
Speakers, including Rep. DeFazio, discuss healthy aging during anniversary celebration
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People
In their circles
134 people
Have them in circles
411 people
ALI RAZA's profile photo
Janet, Jenner & Suggs's profile photo
Queen mhew's profile photo
Anant Malhotra's profile photo
Schyler Sprague's profile photo
SRG Oxford's profile photo
neno yaser's profile photo
Uzoma Ozuo's profile photo
SRG's profile photo
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541-737-3220
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College of Public Health and Human Sciences Oregon State University 160 NW 26th St. Corvallis, OR 97331-8577
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Lifelong health and well-being for every person, every family, every community.
Introduction

Lifelong health and well-being for every person, every family and every community guides the work of our distinguished faculty and extraordinary students. We are responding to the most challenging public health issues facing us today, focusing on prevention strategies to promote health across the lifespan, from healthy children to healthy aging. We are teaching, conducting pioneering research and delivering outreach programs that address optimal nutrition for health, overcoming poverty and hunger, changing inactive lifestyles, improving the lives of children and older adults at-risk, preventing disease, addressing public policy and access to healthcare, and maximizing environmentally friendly materials and structures. 

Inspired by our mission as a leading land-grant university, we create synergy in teaching, research, and outreach to develop the next generation of globally minded public health and human sciences professionals. Through interdisciplinary research and innovative curricula, we advance knowledge, policies and practices that improve population health in communities across Oregon and beyond.