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CPHHS students and incarcerated youth find similarities, support during community service project

Assistant Professor Leslie Richard’s Families in Poverty has inspired Tasha Galardi, a PhD student in Human Development and Family Studies, more than once. She was first motivated to consider the HDFS program as a graduate student after completing the course in 2009. Leslie served as her master’s thesis advisor when she did enroll in the program. Tasha’s since taught the class online and recently led a unique community service project with current students.

Prior to the spring term, Tasha presented Leslie with the idea of leading a group of students in a community service project at the all-female Oak Creek Youth Correctional Facility in Albany. Students in the class are required to complete a service project that involves 20 hours of engagement. Leslie was supportive and enthusiastic, and after receiving the green light Tasha worked with 10 students to supervise the project from planning to fruition.

“I wanted it to be completely collaborative. I didn’t want it to be OSU students teaching Oak Creek girls,” Tasha says. “I wanted it to be that they were all learning together and breaking down any barriers or differences and that they were really in a group experience.”

Tasha says she was hoping for the students and incarcerated girls – ages 13-21 ­– to see how alike they were as they got to know each other on an equal playing field. She says the group found they had many similarities and that a handful of the incarcerated young women are thinking about their futures, including college.
Tasha says she was hoping for the students and incarcerated girls – ages 13-21 ­– to see how alike they were as they got to know each other on an equal playing field. She says the group found they had many similarities and that a handful of the incarcerated young women are thinking about their futures, including college.
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This program is offered to undergraduate students pursuing a major or minor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences or in a related discipline, who have an OSU GPA of 2.5 or greater.

Course Title(s):
H225, Individual and Social Determinants of Health (4 cr.)
H333, Global Health (3 cr.)
H401 Research and Scholarship (2 cr.)

All students will be housed at Green Path Guest House, which is closely located to the SWASTI building where classes are held. The accommodations are safe, convenient to public transportation and offer modern conveniences.

Participants will work in close collaboration with SWASTI: Health Resource Centre in Bangalore. The College of Public Health and Human Science’s existing partnership with SWASTI will help facilitate student excursions to communities in and around Bangalore for experiential learning. It will also provide an opportunity for students to integrate classroom learning with hands-on community-based activities.
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About 200 students receive scholarships or fellowships in the CPHHS each year, totaling more than $400,000. Each year, the college recognizes their achievement.

For the last two years, that recognition was in the form of a pizza party, where students took time to write letters to the donors who support their education – and also have a little fun.
About 200 students receive scholarships or fellowships in the CPHHS each year, totaling more than $400,000. And each year, the college recognizes their achievement. For the last two years, that recognition was in the form of a pizza party, where students took time to write letters to the donors who support their education – and also have a little fun.
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“I owe everything to OSU because it made me the successful man I am. I’m not going to take credit and say I did it by myself. OSU took me from a boy and made me into a man,”
Among alumni guests was Marvin Yonamine from Mililani, Hawaii. Mililani is on the island of Oahu and is over 2,690 miles from Corvallis. I was fortunate to be able to catch up with Marvin before he headed home. I chatted ­­– or “talked story” as they would say in Hawaii – with him about his experiences at OSU and how it’s helped shaped his life.
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Learning Bayesian Networks from Correlated Data

#Bayesian networks are probabilistic models that represent complex distributions in a modular way and have become very popular in many fields.

There are many methods to build Bayesian networks from a random sample of independent and identically distributed observations.

However, many observational studies are designed using some form of clustered sampling that introduces correlations between observations within the same cluster and ignoring this correlation typically inflates the rate of false positive associations.

We describe a novel parameterization of Bayesian networks that uses random effects to model the correlation within sample units and can be used for structure and parameter learning from correlated data without inflating the Type I error rate.

We compare different learning metrics using simulations and illustrate the method in two real examples: an analysis of genetic and non-genetic factors associated with human longevity from a family-based study, and an example of risk factors for complications of sickle cell anemia from a longitudinal study with repeated measures.

#statistics #biostatistics #Bioinformatics
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“Generally speaking, I hope to be part of the team that helps to increase and strengthen linkages between OSU/CPHHS, and the public health and health care industry and workforce.”

Ann Custer joined the Oregon State University Center for Health Innovation earlier this year as manager of workforce development and corporate relations. Ann joins the college from Linn-Benton Community College, where she served as a faculty member from 2004-2016. She’s also held positions as a health care educator, a rehabilitation manager and an occupational therapist.

“Since we moved here 12 years ago, my husband and I have fallen in love with Oregon in general and with Corvallis in particular. Though I was happily employed at the community college, I was also hoping to work for OSU’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences one day. Last fall is when I first learned of its new Oregon State University Center for Health Innovation. The word “innovation” captured my attention since I’ve so enjoyed collaborating with others to develop and deliver innovative health-related programming. When I later read the job description for this position, I knew I had to apply.”
Since we moved here 12 years ago, my husband and I have fallen in love with Oregon in general and with Corvallis in particular. Though I was happily employed at the community college, I was also hoping to work for OSU’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences one day.
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Daily Smoking and Subjective Health Complaints in Adolescence


Abstract

Introduction: Using data from the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey, this study used a repeated cross-sectional design to examine associations between daily smoking, gender, and self-reported health complaints in five cohorts of adolescents over a 16-year period.

Methods: Data were from nationally representative cohorts of 15-year-old youth in Norway in 1993/94, 1997/98, 2001/02, 2005/06, and 2009/10 (ntotal=7,761). Dependent variables were psychological, somatic, and total health complaints. A mixed GLM model examined main and interaction effects of smoking (daily, intermittent, nonsmoking), year, and gender in predicting complaints. Time periods were segmented to compare trends across smoking groups in specific periods.

Results: Prevalence of daily smoking declined from 15.5% (1993/94) to 6.0% (2009/10). All health complaint scores were significantly higher for smokers and for girls (vs. boys). Smoking status by year interactions were significant for all complaint variables during the period of sharpest decline of daily smoking prevalence (2001/02-2005/06), with daily smokers experiencing increases in health complaints while intermittent and nonsmokers did not. Smoking status by gender interactions were significant for all health complaint variables, indicating that the main effect for gender (females higher) was even stronger among smokers compared to nonsmokers. Using year as unit of analysis, the size of mean differences between smokers and intermittent/nonsmokers in total complaints was significantly negatively correlated with daily smoking prevalence (-.963, n=5, p<.001).

Conclusions: As prevalence of daily smoking declined, daily smokers reported higher levels of complaints, suggesting increasing health problems within this group. Girls who smoke daily had particularly elevated levels of complaints.

Implications: what this study adds This study indicates that the relationship between daily smoking and concurrent health symptomatology in adolescents is changing over time, with higher levels of health complaints reported as overall smoking prevalence declines. To our knowledge, this finding has not previously been reported. If youth are smoking to cope with distress, pain, or other health concerns, tobacco control objectives will be increasingly difficult to achieve with adolescents. Levels of health complaints are particularly high among girls who are daily smokers. The findings suggest that restrictive measures and persuasive communications may not be sufficient tobacco prevention strategies for adolescent populations. Young smokers may need counseling and support.
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The USA faces disproportionate and increasing HIV incidence rates among Black men who have sex with men (BMSM). New biomedical technologies such as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) have been developed to address their HIV risk.

Very little consideration, however, has been given to the diversity obscured by 'BMSM' as a category, to how this diversity relates to men's sexual partnering strategies, or to the relevance of these issues for new HIV prevention methods.

We conducted a community-based ethnography from June 2013 to May 2014 documenting factors that affect the acceptance of and adherence to PrEP among BMSM. We conducted in-depth interviews with 31 BMSM and 17 community stakeholders, and participant observation.

To demonstrate the diversity of social identities, we present a taxonomy of indigenous categories organized along the axes of sexual identity, sexual positioning, and gender performance. We analyse how HIV prevention strategies, such as PrEP, may be more effective if programmes consider how gender, sexuality, and sexual desire shape sexual partnering strategies.

This article underlines the importance of attending to the diversity of sexual and social subjectivities among BMSM, of bringing the study of sexuality back into HIV prevention, and of integrating biomedical prevention approaches into community-based programmes.
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“Richard consistently offered a unique perspective in class, and his passion for working with individuals more specifically individuals with disabilities was evident in his volunteer work within and outside of OSU,” says Assistant Professor Megan MacDonald.

“Richard is one of the most enthusiastic students I have ever taught and worked with,” says Assistant Professor Sam Logan. “He has a genuine desire to help others and it comes through from the moment you meet him. He is kind and intelligent, and we are proud to have him as a CPHHS alum.”

#BeaverNation #BeaverGrad #Kinesiology
Transitioning from active military service to the classroom is never easy. Kinesiology student Richard Erfuth, 34, knows firsthand, and his adaptability and dedication has paid off. After his graduation from the CPHHS next month, he will continue his education and journey toward becoming a physician assistant.
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You probably heard the recent news that only a small fraction of Americans – 2.7 percent – are living what’s consider a “healthy lifestyle.” CPHHS professor Ellen Smit was senior author of the study, which looked at factors such as good diet, moderate exercise, recommended body fat percentage and abstaining from smoking.

More than 150 media outlets across America and internationally broadcasted the grim news: Americans are at risk for cardiovascular disease and many other health problems.

So, what do we do now?

The good news is that individuals can start by doing what they enjoy.

Ellen says finding enjoyment in what you eat and what you do is key. “For activity, yoga may not be my cup of tea, but I enjoy CrossFit. Find an activity that you enjoy doing and do it for longer and more often. For eating, red peppers may not be my favorite, but I love lots of beets, cauliflower and brussels sprouts. Fill half your plate with a variety of fruits and vegetables that you like, try a new vegetable or fruit every week or month, switch to whole grains for one of your daily foods, and eat whole grains more often,” she says.
Ellen says finding enjoyment in what you eat and what you do is key. “For activity, yoga may not be my cup of tea, but I enjoy CrossFit. Find an activity that you enjoy doing and do it for longer and more often. For eating, red peppers may not be my favorite, but I love lots of beets, cauliflower and brussels sprouts. Fill half your plate with a variety of fruits and vegetables that you like, try a new vegetable or fruit every week or month, swit...
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Hey CPHHS Alumni - Monthly updates of upcoming events and programming, just for you. Check it out.
Welcome to the new Synergies column that will highlight upcoming alumni (and friends!) events and programming. As the college’s new alumni relations director, I look forward to being your point of contact for the many ways to stay connected to your alma mater. Please take a moment to read about our events for May and June. I hope you will join us for one – or all!
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The college’s renowned Adapted Physical Activity Program continues to be a national stand-out, receiving consistent funding for the past 25 years. It’s the only program in the United States to receive funding from the U.S. Department of Education training future leaders in adapted physical activity for both master’s and PhD students. The program attracts students from around the country who want to be leaders in helping individuals with disabilities.

Thanks to Kinesiology faculty JK Yun, Megan MacDonald and Sam Logan, the program recently received another $1.2 million grant to fund five PhD students over the next five years. In addition to the doctoral grant, a master’s grant is currently funding 30 students. Both grants are highly competitive in nature.

This new grant will start funding the first student in the fall. JK says that having this type of funding will be recruit highly qualified student and train effective leaders in adapted physical activity. It will address a critical shortage area in working with individuals with disabilities.

“The purpose of this training grant is to reduce critical shortages in people who want to work with people with disabilities,” JK says. “The great thing about this particular grant is we want to train future physical education teachers in ways to increase health and well-being in children with disabilities.”

He says that when you look at physical education, there are many people suggesting physical activity as one of the main components in improving public health practice. With inactivity being the second leading cause of death in the United States, there is a great need for increasing the number of professionals in the field.

Students in the Adapted Physical Activity Program have numerous opportunities to work directly with individuals with adapted physical activity needs through programs such as IMPACT, IMPACT for Life, GoBabyGo and MS Exercise Program.
The college's renowned Adapted Physical Activity Program continues to be a national stand-out, receiving consistent funding for the past 25 years. The only program in the United States to receive funding from the U.S. Department of Education training future leaders in adapted physical activity for both master’s and PhD students. The program attracts students from around the country who want to be leaders in helping individuals with disabilities. ...
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Lifelong health and well-being for every person, every family, every community.
Introduction

Lifelong health and well-being for every person, every family and every community guides the work of our distinguished faculty and extraordinary students. We are responding to the most challenging public health issues facing us today, focusing on prevention strategies to promote health across the lifespan, from healthy children to healthy aging. We are teaching, conducting pioneering research and delivering outreach programs that address optimal nutrition for health, overcoming poverty and hunger, changing inactive lifestyles, improving the lives of children and older adults at-risk, preventing disease, addressing public policy and access to healthcare, and maximizing environmentally friendly materials and structures. 

Inspired by our mission as a leading land-grant university, we create synergy in teaching, research, and outreach to develop the next generation of globally minded public health and human sciences professionals. Through interdisciplinary research and innovative curricula, we advance knowledge, policies and practices that improve population health in communities across Oregon and beyond.