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Peter Irons
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For the last 26 years I have been working with people, trying to understand why some find reading easier than others. To start with it did not make sense. Gradually it is starting to do so.  Prof Elliot of Durham University challenges us to consider what 'dyslexia is', even whether there is such a 'thing'. It exists in that it is agreed by many academics that it does! What is certainly true is that  people vary in their access to text and this variation is not to do with their intelligence ( whatever that is !) or opportunity.

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Is Print Font size in books and examinations,controlling the academic achievement of most people? More evidence from a primary school
Is Print
Font size in books and examinations,controlling the academic achievement of
most people? More
evidence from a primary school I have been struggling with how to approach this post. In
previous posts I have referred to the issue of font size and the ...

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Twin studies are useful tools to compare the effects of nature and nurture. I have seen several identical twins among the dyslexic students. One pair had a different optimal RGB the first time but at the third consultation they had identical optimal RGB values.  In a sense that is a 16 million to one chance!  The real message from this study is that we need to look at individual differences to enable maximum educational achievement. NOT just assume that the more 'effort 'is needed. 

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Comment the UK
twin study on Genetics and educational outcomes . I thought it
relevant to put directly into my blog the introduction from the twin study
concerning educational outcomes and genetics The PLOS one
URL is given below. The findings
of this study...

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This post is a detailed deconstruction of the data on reading performance collected during a consultation with a student. She has given permission for an anonymised version to go on the blog. It looks in detail at the way adjusting the parameters controlling the presentation of text on a computer screen can change the reading performance of the individual. It considers most of the issues that have been reported in this blog.

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Report on the outcomes of a consultation looking at visual intervention with a student identified as being Dyspraxic and dyslexic.
 Report on the outcomes of a consultation looking
at visual intervention with a student identified as being Dyspraxic and dyslexic . This particular post is I believe of considerable importance; it is a detailed analysis / deconstruction of the response of ...

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In the USA, and to a great extent in the UK where our opaque language appears to make reading difficult for many it is almost a 'crime' in the orthodox world of dyslexia research to consider the visual aspects of reading difficulties. The research here from Harvard,gingerly reopens the issue, but of course with lots of caveats, to try not to rock the boat too much!

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Comments on article from Harvard about e-readers and dyslexia. A visual component acknowledged in the USA!
I have been
thinking a great deal about the ‘research’ that has come out of Harvard
recently. The abstract
I reprint below.  This research has been
published on PLOS ONE, a peer reviewed, open access journal.  http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10....

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Data comparing the eye movements (fixation management) of a student with a nystagmus and a fluent undergraduate. The origin of a nystagmus is interesting and possibly for many associated with poor retinal processing  resulting from inadequate melanin in the sclera of the eye. Adjusting the  ambient lighting and background luminosity of text including rgb ratios appears to affect the feedback mechainisms needed to maintain fixations.

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Eye movements for a student with nystagmus reading compared with a fluent reader.
It has been
said that Nystagmus is one of the most common forms of visual disability
experienced by Schoolchildren. The same would then of course be true of all age
groups, since it does not ‘ go away’. What I have
done in this blog is to try to explain and...
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