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Larry Bushey
Works at Going Linux Podcast
Lives in California
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Larry Bushey
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Contributing to Open Source  - 
 
This article reminds me of how I envision Open Source development being done. Am I right?

The difference looks like these folks work in the same physical location. I wonder if their organizational model lends itself to the use of the Agile development methodology.
Our company has just turned eight years old, has a presence in all of Latin America, and currently has 36 members on its team. Our biggest obsession: productivity.
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+Larry Bushey I don't know if it is too good to be true. My own experience trying to foster a new site to self-administer without manager, formal reviews, discipline, and, yes, terminations was abysmal. The crew cut each other slack. Then, they were employees, not equity owners, no stock options to inspire devotion, much less commitment.

HAL, which has made its recent "living" usurping US jobs and moving them offshore depends on extracting from employees any specific knowledge about process. A Wiki is one way to do that. And the outsourcing depends on molding a business's processes into industry standards, e.g., SAP. That's been underway for years as executives view accounting and IT as costs that don't provide a competitive advantage. And, of course they don't, since everyone is on the same system (SAP).

Steve Jobs, now there was a committee of one, was so famously angered at the incompetent, hyper-promoted, new MobileMe that he fired everyone on the team. Well, except himself; surely the resources allocated had some part in the fail, and Apple just doesn't have a lot of bodies to charge the trenches.

Is there someone, an owner, a venture capitalist, at the promoted startup who can fire the whole team, and the possibility keeps 'em hoppin' -

We just don't know, from that story.

"All Animals are equal, some are more equal than others."
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Larry Bushey
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General Discussion  - 
 
What are you going to do when you have to pay a fee every year to use Windows software?

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic. Since Microsoft announced that they will begin charging a fee per year to use their Windows applications, like Office, and Windows 10 will become what they are calling "Windows as a service" on your computer, he's been getting asked about alternatives to Windows. Here is one of his observations. (Link is to the full article.)

"Over the years, 99% of the people that contacted me about using Linux as an alternative operating system were nerds, IT pros, and those in the know. Now? I'm getting contacted by your grandmother, your weird uncle, that lady with too many cats, and the adorable young couple who ride matching scooters everywhere they go. That's what's different this time around. Everyone is looking for an alternative—one that will allow them to check their email, get on Facebook, listen to music, toss a sideways glance toward their bank account, pay their bills, and watch videos. These are the people looking for a reliable alternative that won't require them to purchase new hardware, visit their local PC repair shop every other month, or spend an arm and a leg when their machine crashed every time they want to play Candy Crush or write a term paper."
Jack Wallen has seen a huge rise in the amount of a single question coming into his inbox. Those asking the question will surprise you... the answer will not.
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Jon V
 
+George Fromtulsa it seems Apple at the moment will get away with anything. But as we saw in the 90's, Microsoft peaked but slowly became unimportant. Hard to believe at that time that Apple would be the next big thing. 
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Larry Bushey
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Linux Tips  - 
 
What is Linux and why should I try it?

Linux is an operating system. Software that runs your computer, like Microsoft’s Windows, Apple’s OSX or Google’s ChromeOS. Linux is a dependable, secure, capable, and modern computer system that rivals all others in both popularity and actual use.

Linux will never be everyone’s desktop operating system any more than Windows, OSX or ChromeOS is right for everyone. However, it is a major operating system that is used 
- on most of the world’s fastest and most powerful supercomputers, 
- on many of (if not most of) the computers that make up the backbone of Internet, 
- and on corporate servers that require stability and reliability. 
Linux is what both Google’s Android and ChromeOS are built upon.

The most popular versions of Linux available today can be described in this way. Linux is a modern computer operating system, with an attractive user interface. Its update manager keeps not only the operating system, but all of its installed applications up to the current release. The operating system is more secure, and better supported than the operating system preinstalled on most home computer hardware today. 

Using Linux provides you with the freedom to run a complete, full-featured operating system, pre-configured with most, if not all, of the applications you will need for your daily computing - or to change anything about the way it looks, the way it works, or the applications it runs to suit your taste. You can run Linux on almost any hardware from the prettiest Macbook to the cheapest netbook, from the newest Chromebook to some very old machines designed for Windows, and from the most powerful Internet servers to the smallest smart thermostat.
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The vast array of distro choice within the Linux world is the most frustrating and most facilitating aspect of the community for a newbie (like me).  Luckily there are many good web sites and podcasts ;-) that discuss the differences, and after a little perseverance sense can be made of the jargon and pretty soon you can get familiarisation comfort. 

The more I live in Linux land the more fascinated I become with a multi threaded community: the various spins, flavours and branches of Linux and; the various community philosophies.  I still haven't decided on how to interpret or describe the wider Linux world, but I'm staying here.  It's a happy place
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Larry Bushey
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Tutorials  - 
 
Going Linux Screencast #009 · Installing and Using TestDisk

TestDisk is a powerful, open source disk recovery tool (GPLv2+) that is available for multiple operating system platforms. It runs under DOS, Windows, BSD, Linux and OSX. In this tutorial, we show how to install TestDisk from Linux software repositories, and how to use TestDisk to recover a deleted partition from a USB drive.

http://goinglinux.com/screencasts.html#glsc009
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3 comments
 
I always have a SystemRescueCD USB stick in my bag of tricks.
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Larry Bushey
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Linux Tips  - 
 
For the first time, I have upgraded Linux Mint to their latest release without installing from scratch. I'm now running Linux Mint 17.2 Rafaela Cinnamon Edition 64-bit. Upgrade was uneventful, and quick. I even went the extra mile and upgraded the kernel to 3.16.0-38! 

If you are ready to upgrade from Mint 17.1, follow the instructions in the link, with two words of caution. 1. Backup everything before you start the upgrade. 2. Make sure your system meets the system requirements for 17.2 if you are on older hardware. 
It is now possible to upgrade the Cinnamon and MATE editions of Linux Mint 17 and Linux Mint 17.1 to version 17.2. If you've been waiting for this I'd like to thank you for your patience. Upgrade for a reason "If it ain't broke, don't fix it". You might want to upgrade to 17.2 because some bug that
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I do this on Slackware, works well. Enforced nuking is a bad policy in this day and age.
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Larry Bushey

Discussion  - 
 
Mint 17.2 tip: Laptop screen brightness adjustment from status panel. 
1. Hover mouse over the battery icon.
2. Use your mouse scroll wheel (or scroll up or down) to increase or decrease brightness.
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Larry Bushey
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Linux Tips  - 
 
Mint 17.2 tip: Laptop screen brightness adjustment from status panel. 
1. Hover mouse over the battery icon.
2. Use your mouse scroll wheel (or scroll up or down) to increase or decrease brightness.
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Jon V
 
I was going to try this on a touchpad but it didn't work. Then I accidently found it as an applet to add to the panel. Thanks!
I have an Acer C720 chromebook and was tired of using the Search + brightness function keys to control brightness.Linux Mint 17.1 works great on this.
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Larry Bushey
owner

General Discussion  - 
 
Going Linux Episode 279 · Getting Started With Linux: There are literally hundreds of versions of Linux to choose from. Each has its own look and feel. Each is designed with a specific purpose in mind. Each comes pre-packaged with a selection of software applications, and each is the same Linux at the core.

Having said that, if you ask 10 people which version of Linux is best, you will get at least 12 different answers. :) The recommendations we give in this episode are based on our experience and knowledge. (I have been using Linux as my exclusive personal computer operating system for about 10 years.)
Practical information for Linux users, and for computer users leaving Windows and 'going Linux'.
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Thanks!
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Larry Bushey

technology, linux, mac, osx  - 
 
TestDisk is cross-platform, so for Sliders like you, +Knight Wise, this would be a useful tool. 
Going Linux Screencast #009 · Installing and Using TestDisk TestDisk is a powerful, open source disk recovery tool (GPLv2+) that is available for… - Larry Bushey - Google+
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Larry Bushey
owner

General Discussion  - 
 
After some issues with VLC file conversion, I was finally able to complete the instructional video about Installing & Using VeraCrypt. This one is in 720p quality, so it should be good. You can find it on our site on the Screencasts tab, at http://goinglinux.com/screencasts.html#glsc008 or on our YouTube channel, or by simply clicking the link, below. 
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+David De Zwirek found a PPA for Veracrypt, linked from its home page. Looks like a legit source as it is hosted by Canonical. Don't think it was there when I recorded the video.
https://launchpad.net/~unit193/+archive/ubuntu/encryption
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  • Going Linux Podcast
    Creator and Host, present
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Using Linux to get things done
Introduction

I am the creator and host of the Going Linux Podcast. As a technology advocate, I use my communication and facilitation skills to help computer users build their confidence and competence with alternative technologies, such as open source software, and with mainstream commercial applications as well.

My broad background in professional training, technology management, management and sales gives me a unique perspective on using today's technology to get things done. Creator, producer and host of a top-rated Internet audio program, I have been helping computer users on-line since 2005, with practical, day-to-day advice on how to use their personal technology.

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Currently
California
Previously
Toronto, Canada