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Kendall Totten
369 followers -
Designer, Drupal-lover, Explorer, Easygoing, Geek.
Designer, Drupal-lover, Explorer, Easygoing, Geek.

369 followers
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Kendall's posts

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This weekend was full of firsts! I tried oil painting for the first time. It's is still in progress but so far so good. And Doug made macarons which were challenging but came out great. And boy are they sweet!!
http://savoryhackers.com/2013/11/17/magnificent-macarons/
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+Doug Kinnison  WE'RE GOING TO SLEIGH BELLS TONIGHT!!!!

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Wow, Google reported a 500% increase in mobile searches over the last 2 years.

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Jeremy Zerr and 3 others were tagged in Kendall Totten's album.
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Added photos to Drupalcon Portland.

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Mmmmyes. :)

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Hey Drupalistas, looking for a job? We're hiring!

Factoid for the Day: Glass Is NOT a Slow-moving Liquid.

You may have lived for field trips as a kid, looking forward to a whole day of out-of-school fun and exploring. That is, until you got started on a tour of some musty building that seemed, well, boring. Not even the tour guide's explanation of how the glass in the wavy, uneven windowpanes has slowly flowed downward over time could keep your attention.

Liquid windowpanes? No.

Rather than the (magical-sounding) slow drip of centuries, the reason old glass windows aren't perfectly even and clear is because of how they were made. Until the early-mid 1800s, most window glass was made using a process called the crown method. The glass was blown, flattened, heated and spun, yielding a sheet that was relatively cheap to produce. It was also rippled and thicker in some places than in others.

In other words, the windows looked that way when they were installed, and they look that way now. No downhill liquid flow is involved. (And if you're really wondering: Glass is an amorphous solid.
http://science.howstuffworks.com/science-vs-myth/everyday-myths/10-false-facts.htm#page=4

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Chrome Canary: CSS Reloading Upon SASS File Save In The Developer Tools 

A few of you have been asking about a new "Auto-reload CSS.." option that appeared under Settings in Canary this week and whether it related to our work on SASS source maps. I dug up the relevant WebKit bug ticket to review.

With this change, debug info generated by SASS in CSS is parsed to find out which SASS files contributed to a stylesheet. When you make SASS file save in the Sources panel, the external CSS stylesheets affected are reloaded to update the page styles. This presumes that SASS is running in the "watch" mode.

I still need to test this out to see how much work is left, but it's a sign of fun things to come soon for all you SASS fans :)

Ticket: http://trac.webkit.org/changeset/132321 #devtools  
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