Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Joseph Wilson
Former Federal Prosecutor and IRS Attorney Helping People Resolve Tax and FBAR disputes
Former Federal Prosecutor and IRS Attorney Helping People Resolve Tax and FBAR disputes
About
Posts

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Test Post from Newport Beach Tax Attorney, Orange County/Irvine | Wilson Tax Law
https://wilsontaxlaw.com
Add a comment...

Post has attachment

Post has attachment

Post has attachment

Post has attachment

Post has attachment

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
A scathing report issued last Thursday by the Treasury Inspector General For Tax Administration showed that 10% of the 2000 employees hired between 1/2015 through 3/2016 at the IRS previously worked there and left while under investigation. Four of the employees were even under investigation for “willful failure” to file their tax returns, while another four were being investigated for peering into taxpayers’ accounts without authorization, the audit said — a major breach of tax privacy. Thirteen of the rehired employees had been probed for falsifying documents, six faced misconduct investigations — including threats — and another 86 had left while being investigated for unexcused absences from work, disruptions in the workplace or being unable to follow instructions. Sometimes the hiring officials didn’t even know the employees’ own history at the IRS. As someone who previously worked at the IRS, (technically, for the IRS Office of Chief Counsel), and as someone who now practices before the IRS, this report does not reflect the majority of the IRS employees. I come across many decent and hardworking people on a daily basis. However, as a concerned citizen, private tax practitioner, and watchdog of taxpayer rights, something needs to be said about the other ten percent. The IRS holds the power to destroy and the power to set free. IRS employees handle the most intimate and personal financial information. It goes without saying all IRS employees need to be properly vetted. When I was hired by the IRS as a litigation attorney (well prior to these years I should add) the IRS audited my personal tax returns as part of the application process. All employees had their tax returns audited as part of the hiring process. Talk about a “not-so-fun” application process. I don’t know what has changed. But based on my personal experience I recall some serious vetting going on during the application process. Thus, its curious how these employees slipped through the cracks. Maybe some didn’t because specific employment laws allow the IRS to rehire if certain conditions are met.



Contact Wilson Tax Law Group, APLC at 949-397-2291 if you have a tax concern or matter that requires diligent, experienced and hands-on representation.
Add a comment...


WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service Office of Appeals will soon pilot a new web-based virtual conference option for taxpayers and their representatives. This virtual face-to-face option will provide an additional option for taxpayer conferences. The IRS expects it to be especially useful for taxpayers located far from an IRS Appeals office.

Each year, the Office of Appeals hears appeals of more than 100,000 taxpayers attempting to resolve their tax disputes without going to court. Currently, taxpayers involved in the appeals process can meet with an Appeals Officer by phone, in person or virtually through videoconference technology available only at a limited number of IRS offices.

While a phone call works well for most taxpayers, others prefer face-to-face interaction. Appeals’ pilot program will use a secure, web-based screen-sharing platform to connect with taxpayers face-to-face from anywhere they have internet access. Similar to popular screen-sharing programs used on phones and home computers, this technology may also be a way for the IRS to provide greater access, efficiency and flexibility to taxpayers. This web-based model is more convenient and has more features than the existing video-conferencing technology.
“Taxpayers who choose the web-based option will be able to get face-to-face service remotely,” said IRS Chief, Appeals Donna Hansberry. “In the future, the technology may give taxpayers greater options in engaging with Appeals and could allow us the flexibility to serve taxpayers virtually from any location using mobile devices or computers.

“We hope this is one more option to enable IRS employees to provide timely, efficient and effective service to taxpayers,” said Hansberry.
Appeals plans to start the pilot Aug. 1, 2017 and will assess the results, including taxpayer satisfaction with the technology.

The IRS reminds taxpayers that their right to appeal an IRS decision in an independent forum is one of 10 key rights guaranteed to taxpayers under the Taxpayer Bill of Rights. Other rights especially relevant to the appeals process include the right to quality service, the right to pay no more than the correct amount of tax, the right to challenge the IRS’s position and be heard and the right to retain representation. For a complete list of the Taxpayer Bill of Rights, see Publication 1, Your Rights as a Taxpayer, available on IRS.gov.
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded