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Ian Grey
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Just finished up the "Mines of Madness" scenario from TotDL and while it wasn't quite a tpk, it did end with the classic "and only I alone survived to tell the tale" moment.

I had special fun constructing the Cartull Queen. The nerrative of the pics pretty much covers them stumbling in to meet her, and how it ended (Orc Warrior turned into mist, Hobgoblin running for his life with a swarm of drones hot on his heels, everyone else dead or dying on the ground with bugs happily chewing on their corpses as they bleed out).
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6/27/17
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One of the things I love about SotDL is the new citters, unique to the game. Downside is if you want to do minis, you gotta get creative. And so, I present to you the Oculus!
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Beware the Oculus!
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So I've seen mentioned in discussions here that there is a boon or bane cap of 6, but I've never seen it in the rules. What page is that written on in core? Or am I mistaken and there is no such rule? (Not wanting to get caught up on the veracity of such a rule, just trying to confirm it's existence)

How restrictive is Iron Vulnerability and similar restrictions for Goblins/Changelings/Elves/Fey magic etc? Can characters get away with just "wearing gloves" and similar cloth barriers? Or is it more substantive, like kryptonite?

I have an Elf Rogue Fey tradition user who also is running about insisting on being a gunslinger, so I'm struggling with how much (if at all) I need to reign her in.

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Wish me luck. My Thursday crew are in the tail end of "The Curious Case of the Errant Swine" and should be meeting the lovely, talented, Alluring Statue tonight.
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So I have an odd little tradition in my games, one that I have been doing for many years that matches Shadow of the Demon Lord really well. A VOID stamp, which I use to mark dead characters (which I save to fan myself with when I'm feeling like reminding my players I am an evil, evil GM).

I was curious though. How many casualties do other GMs typically encounter in their games? Since January I've been running two campaigns, with a net total of 15-18 players between them (averaging 6-7 players in each group each session).

Here is my memorial list of who died and how. Warning, spoilers follow for the adventures referenced, so you may not read if you expect to be playing said scenarios...

My Monday Night Madness crew has had the following "sacrifices" over the course of three adventures ("The Witching Wood", "Harvester of Shadows", "The Knife in your hand", with brief interludes into "Last One Standing" & "The Curious Case of the Errant Swine"):

1.Caleb (Human scholar, first casualty in "The Witching Wood") death by Burrowing Centipede exploding out of his chest.
2. Rook (Changeling scholar, second casualty in "the Witching Wood") also died due to Burrowing Centipede, but managed to carry it around inside of him for a day or two without anyone knowing until he had been incapacitated by Void Larvae. And THEN it ruptured out of his chest, finishing him off.
3. Snot (Goblin Mage, casualty in "Harvester of Sorrow") died rushing to get past a ghoul. One shot. Mages are squishy.
4. Dr. Anselm (Human Priest) murdered by the ghoul while trying to hide, having abandoned the rest of the party upstairs fighting the Harvester. The ghoul had enough time to eat him and take his place for the rest of the session. The following session he followed another PC home and tried to eat them, leading to the group running, screaming through the slums for half a session until they rallied to take him out.
No one died in "The Knife in your hand", though we got close to a TPK at one point.

My Thursday Night Thunderers have had much worse luck, with my cousin taking the cake loosing no less than 5 characters so far. They played through "the Slaver's Lash", "Born to Die" and are still working on "The Curious Case of the Errant Swine", with brief dips in into "Last One Standing":

1. Cushah (Orc flagellant, casualty in "The Slaver's Lash") killed fighting for freedom by Orc captors durring their second attempt.
2. Lurk the Digger (Changling grave-digger, casualty in "The Slaver's Lash") killed by Fomori raiders while defending camp.
3. Clem Bright (Human Priest, casualty in "Born to Die") bleeds out after taking a brutal hit fighting Rude Boys on the island.
4. Eustce (Faun Warrior, casualty in "Born to Die") killed by the demon during their second raid on the island.
5. Flower Parkor (Orc Mage, first casualty in "Curious Case...") slaughtered and skinned by Bloodybones while taking a nap in the long grass surrounding Ham's farm.
6. Joe Mann (Human Warrior, casualty in "Curious Case...") murdered by Bloodybones while sticking his nose into the long grasses to see what that rustling was all about.
7. Black Widdow, aka "Grace" (Elf Mage, casualty in "Curious Case...") butchered by Bloodybones while making a run for a parked Motorcycle.
8. Bone Chewer (Orc Warrior, casualty in "Curious Case...") killed fighting Wargs.
9. Backwash (Goblin Mage, casualty in "Curious Case...") fish food for a hungry swarm.

Honorable mentions: these characters didn't die, but were left for dead on multiple occasions...
1. 8008135 (humanoid Clockwork Priest, wound down in "Born to die") wound down while fighting Rude Boys on the island, and no one could get to him when they were forced to retreat by the demon. Presuming they weren't ever going to go back, 8's player made Eustce, but the party managed to wind him up after the faun died as they fled the island for the second time.
2. Franklin Faust (spider-Clockwork Mage, wound down twice in "Curious Case...") incapacitated by Wargs while up a tree, but otherwise left alone because he's inedible. Eventually lucked out and restarted, wandering into town not long after his fellow survivors. Second time he was smashed so badly we thought he'd been killed outright while being ambushed by Bloodybones. After a detailed reading of how object state works in the "Ghosts in the Machine" article, I ruled as the blow failed to demolish his Object health in the same blow, he could still be repaired/recovered. Judicious use of Fortune kept his soul in his body.
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Came up with these for helping my players to keep track of their turns & Fortune.
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Here's a location map I threw together using Inkarnate.com for my run of "The Curious Case of the Errant Swine," tweeked for my neo-Godless setting.
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So we started "The Curious Case of the Errant Swine" last night (which one of our players declared reminded her of her dating life), with only 5 of nine players attending. They arrived at at the farm in the early evening and promptly split up. Two followed the path through the tall grass to the edge of the woods, two went over to investigate the pig-pens (and be suitably horrified by what they found in the shed), and our Orc Mage decided she was feeling lazy and tired and wanted to go deep into the tall grass to nap.

So of course she was the first to die. Flayed and killed before she had a chance to wake and scream.

By the end of the first hour we'd lost over half the party (the bloody bones having yanked the fighter into the thicket when he went to peer in to see what was moving around, flayed him quick and run down the elf Mage before she could make it to the motorcycle (we're also mixing it up with Godless). She at least DID get a chance to scream, but by the time the Clockwork Priest and Dwarf Warrior got back to the farm (they move slow), the only traces of their comrades was a trail of blood leading through the thickets into the forest.

Our brave God Machine waddled off into the woods to find it's missing parishioners, but the Dwarf had had enough, hopped on her motorbike and went back to Hamlet for the night. The Priest got distracted by a scream early on and managed to save maiden in distress Delilah all by itself (mainly through stealth, a well placed sanctuary spell and threats of damnation - aided by Fomor cowardice), after which he escorted her back to town, getting the inside scoop as to what was going on and a new convert to boot.

Reunited in Hamlet's singular Motel the two were joined by a pair of warriors (replacement pcs), an Orc and a(n incognito) Vampire, as well as the Mercenary caravan guard (husband to the now deceased elf Mage), and after some carousing turn in for the night (except for the Vamp, who snuck out to eat someone's dog). In the morning they're out & off to the farm to pick up where they left off, a little more weary and wise.

So, session one? Three casualties and the threat of party wipe. Fun had by all.

So I've sprung the scenario "Last One Standing" on my players and now that they've actually picked a faction (sort of - some are looking at it as a stepping stone for demolishing all factions, but some actually want to see the faction they joined win - trouble in the future I think), I'm looking at future fact in missions for earning trust & run into a major hitch (spoilers below)----
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->mainly that the Trust missions for the Cartel involves the gang going down into the Water Treatment Plant to hunt a Hag. Now if this were a Master level adventure, that would be something, but as a Novice level scenario (with options to be a campaign framework notwithstanding) this is a bit much - at least not without some serious thought. Hags are difficulty 500, and as former water fey simply drowning them won't do the trick. The best idea I had (short of just switching out the monster) was to set up the option of them using the waterworks to flush her out (presuming they survive finding out what she is), but I thought I'd poll the community and see what other thoughts folks might have. 
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