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Ian Grey
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Here's a location map I threw together using Inkarnate.com for my run of "The Curious Case of the Errant Swine," tweeked for my neo-Godless setting.
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So we started "The Curious Case of the Errant Swine" last night (which one of our players declared reminded her of her dating life), with only 5 of nine players attending. They arrived at at the farm in the early evening and promptly split up. Two followed the path through the tall grass to the edge of the woods, two went over to investigate the pig-pens (and be suitably horrified by what they found in the shed), and our Orc Mage decided she was feeling lazy and tired and wanted to go deep into the tall grass to nap.

So of course she was the first to die. Flayed and killed before she had a chance to wake and scream.

By the end of the first hour we'd lost over half the party (the bloody bones having yanked the fighter into the thicket when he went to peer in to see what was moving around, flayed him quick and run down the elf Mage before she could make it to the motorcycle (we're also mixing it up with Godless). She at least DID get a chance to scream, but by the time the Clockwork Priest and Dwarf Warrior got back to the farm (they move slow), the only traces of their comrades was a trail of blood leading through the thickets into the forest.

Our brave God Machine waddled off into the woods to find it's missing parishioners, but the Dwarf had had enough, hopped on her motorbike and went back to Hamlet for the night. The Priest got distracted by a scream early on and managed to save maiden in distress Delilah all by itself (mainly through stealth, a well placed sanctuary spell and threats of damnation - aided by Fomor cowardice), after which he escorted her back to town, getting the inside scoop as to what was going on and a new convert to boot.

Reunited in Hamlet's singular Motel the two were joined by a pair of warriors (replacement pcs), an Orc and a(n incognito) Vampire, as well as the Mercenary caravan guard (husband to the now deceased elf Mage), and after some carousing turn in for the night (except for the Vamp, who snuck out to eat someone's dog). In the morning they're out & off to the farm to pick up where they left off, a little more weary and wise.

So, session one? Three casualties and the threat of party wipe. Fun had by all.

So I've sprung the scenario "Last One Standing" on my players and now that they've actually picked a faction (sort of - some are looking at it as a stepping stone for demolishing all factions, but some actually want to see the faction they joined win - trouble in the future I think), I'm looking at future fact in missions for earning trust & run into a major hitch (spoilers below)----
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->mainly that the Trust missions for the Cartel involves the gang going down into the Water Treatment Plant to hunt a Hag. Now if this were a Master level adventure, that would be something, but as a Novice level scenario (with options to be a campaign framework notwithstanding) this is a bit much - at least not without some serious thought. Hags are difficulty 500, and as former water fey simply drowning them won't do the trick. The best idea I had (short of just switching out the monster) was to set up the option of them using the waterworks to flush her out (presuming they survive finding out what she is), but I thought I'd poll the community and see what other thoughts folks might have. 

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I thought folks might enjoy seeing this. Using the web app mapping tool Inkarnate (still in beta, but you can do some real nice stuff with it), I spliced the maps from Tales of the Demon Lord for the city of Crossings with the town map for Isolon from the Godless/Last One Standing, plus layered in a few extra locations for later adventures Gorgon's Tears & Last Train to Darksville. Last One Standing is an exceptionally flexible adventure for this sort of sandboxing, giving my players some solid political intrigue goals to play with when their not sure what to do next (their 1st Novice adventure morphed from LOS into TotDL's Born to Die seamlessly when they started courting the Guild Cartel). The politics illustrated in TotDL for Crossings gives a much more nuanced setup for local government than LOS's single Sheriff struggling under the thumb of rival gangs. Using Godless's Radiation rules, the Dark Water now is so named because of toxic sludge polluting the lake. I'm thinking of using the Airfield for Dancing in the Ruins, changing the Party King's Fleet into a Flying Circus if I run short on adventures. Only real downside of foreshadowing by map was when the party started focusing in on certain locations related to adventures they're just not yet ready for.

In case it isn't obvious, my campaign is set in it's own homebrew setting (neither Rul or Godless), heavily inspired by Miazaki's Valley of the Wind, Vance's Dying Earth & Bakshi's Wizards. So radioactive toxic sludge, mixed levels of technology and lost ruined civilizations are all very appropriate. 
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Has anyone done a conversion for Dragonborn or Yuan-Ti ancestries for SotDL? I suspect the upcoming Freeport book should be useful for reskining/adaption for reptilian races, but was wondering if anyone had already put some work into this.

Just finished running my first SDL adventure - "The Slaver's Lash" - and folks had a blast. It took us four sessions (2-3 hour per session, including character creation the first week & a few battle-map fights on week 3). My groups tend to be large (we have a net pool of about 9 players, though typically only 5-7 show on any given night) and love to chew the scenery (which means earning Fortune hasn't been a problem for them, and they've demonstrated they needed it!), so 4 sessions for an otherwise short adventure doesn't surprise me.

In general my players have been finding it pretty simple to pick up, and really appreciate how initiative works (not rolling like in other games seems to really speed fights up). Brutality of combat worked well for both sides (we used both the "Battle Scars" PDF & Crits & Fumbles from "Forbidden Rules"), though random chance seemed to favor me over my players (I rolled the only crit in the game, and only one or two fumbles, while they seemed to have a slew of 1s popping up both in and out of combat that almost got silly at times). Even so, using modular rule sets didn't seem to slow things down at all.

Running the adventure in my own homebrew setting also worked surprisingly well. The last session was mainly the journey back to civilization over the course of a week, so I rolled all the random encounters in advance and mixed them up with the Interesting Sights tables for the Wastes & Desolation from "Godless" & from "Tombs of Desolation." I also further defined the other escaped slaves with random professions, which gave them a tour guide when one turned out to be a folklorist (and another, a Pioneer, meant someone actually knew how to manage the horse & wagons they managed to make off with).

We had only two casualties (Crusher, an Orc, who got a little absorbed in the fight when the group was trying to escape the second time, and Lurch, a Changeling gravedigger who, while still impaired by a prior injury and insisting on fighting only with a shovel as an improvised weapon, was quickly taken down by the one crit in the game by a Fomori).

This seems to be getting a little long and riding the edge of spoilers, so I'll hold off writing an actual blow-by-blow of the game (unless there's interest), but I (and my players) really felt positive about how the adventure and rules played out.

Burrowing Centipedes are evil. At this point I now have two pcs (lvl 0) infested with them, and no one in that party with either knowledge of medicine, or a comparable profession, and both characters have taken sufficient damage that if I have them pop out doing automatic damage they'll most likely die. Not that I'm adverse to that, but I'm looking for ideas and options to keep things entertaining.

So here's a few ideas & questions?
1) as long as no one is trying to play doctor and otherwise pissing the critters off, just how long can BCs hide in their hosts? Days? Months? Could I leave them in there, allowing the characters to heal up & only suffer from the Impairment affliction for one or more adventures/levels until someone gets the idea to visit a Doctor, or have them finally resurface (aka Alien) at a dramatically stressful moment when they later have enough health to actually take the damage?
2) at what point might the BCs lay eggs? And when might they hatch? The vision of the character suddenly exploding in multiple Centipedes would likely be worth several points of Insanity at least. (Alien, again, gives some suitably entertaining ideas for how awful that might be).
3) what might be good alternate treatments for removing (or in reverse, aggravating) the Centepedes? I've already been running with the idea that someone trying to stab at them while still inside e host (as opposed to a skilled physician taking his time) can pis them off and possibly result in them coming out to fight, but for starting characters that is a fairly lethal approach. The idea of toxins, aka poisoning the host, might also work, but again, likely worse for the host than the condition of being infested.

Thoughts? Ideas?

So in preparing for "The Slaver's Lash", it mentions that the Orcs will endeavor to subdue uppity pcs, but in poking through the rules I'm finding nothing for rules for simply knocking characters out. Now I don't object to walking the knife's edge of lethality (a bit more realistic and all), if there ARE such rules it would be a mercy for me to use them (I have had pcs stubbornly fight to the death before, preferring death to capture - I can see a poor Orc slaver beating a PC until they are incapacitated, then struggling to make the INT check to stabilize them and give them a hp back, then whacking them upside the head again when the predictable PC starts fighting all over again). Again, not above killing the little buggers if they're too ornery, but if there's a rule I'm missing (like D&D's old non-lethal damage option) I'd like to know.

So I seem to have talked myself into running not one but two SotDL campaigns, the first of which (as I think I mentioned in another post) being "the Slaver's Lash," and the second being "the Witching Wood." The crew for the 2nd game have already thrown together their team, all picking Ancestries that can see in the dark (a Goblin, Hobgoblin, Faun & Orc), so I have established them as all members of the militia night-watch. Given the conservative, religious flavor of the humano-centric town, I'm getting kinda a "Breakfast Club" in "Pleasantvile" feel. Given that, does anyone have advice or experience with Witching Wood, or suggestions they'd like to share?

So I'm finally able to start up a SotDL game now that my PF game has met it's bloody and merciless end, and am planning to kick it off with "The Slaver's Lash" (gave them the choice of starting in a city, in a town, lost in the woods while hunted by bandits, or in rags as part of a slaver's chain gang - guess what they picked?). Anyone have any thoughts or advice for that storyline?
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