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Pash Living
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From the blog: "The Chair That Floats in the Air" - http://ow.ly/Qsuz1 #contemporary #design #living #lifestyle

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If you want something eye catching, practical and suitable for just about any room, why not choose an Egg?

http://www.pash-living.co.uk/blog/funky-furniture/why-not-take-a-spin-on-an-egg.html

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We all love classic 20th century furniture designs, but maybe you also want to bring something with a little more brash into your home, and this is where accessorising is essential.

http://www.pash-living.co.uk/blog/contemporary-designers/its-time-to-accessorise-your-mid-century-room.html
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You’ve probably noticed the copper trend. This Poul Henningsen inspired Artichoke lamp combines copper and style, do you know anyone this stylish? read more...

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A sad goodbye to Mad Men.
Has there ever been another television show that has had so much influence on the way that we dress ourselves and furnish our homes?

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Eero Saarinen’s Secret Intelligence:

A one time poster boy of modernist architecture in 1950s America (in 1956 he appeared on the cover of Time magazine) shortly after his death in 1961 (aged 51) Saarinen reputation took a nose dive. However, recently his legacy has been favourably reappraised and he’s now once again regarded as one of the twentieth century’s greatest American architects. Read More: http://www.pash-living.co.uk/blog/contemporary-designers/eero-saarinens-secret-intelligence.html

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Eames inspired DSW chair
The winning entry in the 1948 New York Museum of Modern Art’s international ‘low cost furniture design competition’, Charles and Ray Eames furniture made effective use of groundbreaking processes and new materials, and in the 1950’s it went on to be the first mass produced plastic chair. So successful was the design that by the late 1960s these chairs could be seen everywhere, from canteens to domestic kitchens, from school classrooms to university seminars. Their ubiquity led to a degree of complancency and over-familiarity on our part and they slowly slipped out of fashion in the 1980s.

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