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Ahmed S. Darwish
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In light of iPhone 8 and X new A11 SoCs, which now contains Apple's own GPU and neural engine, below article is very fitting: “The iPhone taught Apple quite a bit about the power found in controlling one's destiny...”

Android & Linux fans love to (arrogantly, and without understanding the much much bigger picture) mock Apple, but I have seen no company with such a full & complete expertise of the technological stack: from CPUs and GPUs (A series and W series chips), to chassis/boards integration and design, to graphics drivers and APIs (Metal), to toolchains (LLVM) and IDEs (Xcode), to new file systems and 1-billion device FS live migrations (APFS), to programming languages (Swift), and the Operating System kernel and user-land APIs (*Kit APIs), to security & privacy (TrustZone / SecureEnclave, sandboxed apps), to the overall beautifully-integrated user experiences (TouchID, FaceID, ..), and finally upward to integrated web services (iCloud).

Beside the business prowess, It's a respectful technological feat that is rarely matched by other companies ..

All of this it seems because the company wanted to perfect its unbelievably-smooth user experience. Gadgets (and their software) before the iPod and iPhone were so ugly and complicated.. Apple raised the user expectations so much in the past 10 years that everyone now have to think about the "user experience" first.. This was I think Apple's gift to the tech community – erasing the ugly legacy of Microsoft Windows 95/98/NT/Vista and their brokerage when people think of "tech"..

Now when people think of "tech", they remember butter-smooth hardware and software designs that are largely influenced by Apple's user-experience discipline in the past decade (iPod, iPhone, MacBook, macOS, iOS) ..

Regardless of the company's projected future, current weakness in the cloud services angle, and the questionable ethics of walled-garden ecosystems, this is a beautiful humans-first legacy which I think will be studied for decades to come ..
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“Countries that nurture pluralism the best will be the ones that thrive the most in the 21st century. They will have the most political stability, attract the most talent and be able to collaborate with the most people.”
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I've always studied F.J. Corbato's papers with great enthusiasm. His research group created the cornerstone of MIT's first modern-like operating system: CTSS — the Compatible Time-Sharing System.

They beautifully introduced the now-classical concepts of time-sharing, multi-level feedback queues, and basic kernel vs. application memory protection, which is now done by almost all relevant computer architectures.

Seeing this video today, and for the first time seeing the man in the flesh enthusiastically describing his creation, quite made my day. Thanks +Alan Cox ;-)
1963 MIT science report on the beginnings of time sharing

https://youtu.be/Q07PhW5sCEk
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Rosamund Pike's narration of Pride and Prejudice is definitely the best audiobook I've heard so far. Her storytelling & acting skills are quite spectacular: http://goo.gl/w6PFUF
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Some wisdom from early Indian philosophy:

“Let go of the fruit of your actions .. Pitful are those who are attached to their action's fruits .. Act for action's sake, and do not be attached to inaction .. Not by avoiding actions does a man gain freedom.”
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Ajahn Brahm is such a great monk from Australia. This talk is about the art of letting things go.
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Jony Ive in 1997, presenting his pet project, the 20th Anniversary Mac.

It was way ahead of its time limited-edition product, and it quite resembles those sexy iMacs created 10 years later. Jony's presentation style and focus on design proves that some things just never change :-)
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As publishers begin posting their content directly into Facebook's native "Instant Articles" platform, we should remember how Facebook's non-neutral algorithmic newsfeed almost killed the Ferguson story on its first day. It was Twitter's untampered news feeds that brought the topic up into the surface.

This was not due to malice on Facebook's part, but it's a reminder on how algorithms can become a source of unintended censorship.
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“As your client knows, Mr. Zuckerberg goes to great lengths to protect the privacy of his personal life.”
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