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Thorfinn Hrolfsson
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Astrophysicists have developed a new method for calculating the effect of Rayleigh scattering on photons, potentially allowing researchers to better understand the formation of the Universe.

UBC theoretical cosmology graduate student Elham Alipour, UBC physicist Kris Sigurdson and Ohio State University astrophysicist Christopher Hirata probed the effect of Rayleigh scattering — the process that makes the sky appear blue when the Sun’s photons are scattered by molecules in the atmosphere  — on the cosmic microwave background (CMB).
Astrophysicists have developed a new method for calculating the effect of Rayleigh scattering on photons, potentially allowing researchers to better understand the formation of the Universe. UBC theoretical cosmology graduate student Elham Alipour, UBC physicist Kris Sigurdson and Ohio State ...
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In the most extensive survey of its kind ever conducted, a team of scientists have found an unambiguous link between the presence of super-massive black holes that power high-speed, radio-signal-emitting jets and the merger history of their host galaxies. Almost all of the galaxies hosting these jets were found to be merging with another galaxy, or to have done so recently. The results lend significant weight to the case for jets being the result of merging black holes and will be presented in the Astrophysical Journal.

A team of astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) have conducted a large survey to investigate the relationship between galaxies that have undergone mergers and the activity of the supermassive black holes at their cores.
In the most extensive survey of its kind ever conducted, a team of scientists have found an unambiguous link between the presence of supermassive black holes that power high-speed, radio-signal-emitting jets and the merger history of their host galaxies. Almost all of the galaxies hosting these jets were found to be merging with another galaxy, or to have done so recently. The results lend significant weight to the case for jets being the result ...
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Will it create a supernova?
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Astronomers have discovered a disc of planetary debris surrounding a young sun-like star that shares remarkable similarities with the Kuiper Belt that lies beyond Neptune, and may aid in understanding how our solar system developed.
An international team of astronomers, including researchers from the University of Cambridge, has identified a young planetary system which may aid in understanding how our own solar system formed and developed billions of years ago.
Astronomers have discovered a disc of planetary debris surrounding a young sun-like star that shares remarkable similarities with the Kuiper Belt that lies beyond Neptune, and may aid in understanding how our solar system developed.
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boa noite
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Thorfinn Hrolfsson

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The microscopic world stall looking amazing
 
Stemonitis axifera, a slime mold commonly found on dead wood. Mantle slugs love these! Photo by Steve Axford
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Thorfinn Hrolfsson

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today's pretty animal, even if it does not have a towel
 
Panther chameleon near the rainforest of Perinet in Madagascar. Did you know this country has already suffered from a 90% rainforest loss? Photo by Cristina Mittermeier 
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remember him
 
Today we mourn the unfortunate loss of Nobel prize-winning mathematician John Nash and his wife Alicia. Cheers to beautiful minds and hearts. #ABeautifulMind 
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An international team, including researchers from the Centre for Astronomy of Heidelberg University (ZAH), has discovered three “cosmic Methusalems” from the earliest years of the universe. These unusual stars are about 13 billion years old and experts assign them to the first generations of stars after the “dark ages”. The chemical qualities of these extremely rare stellar bodies enable new insights into the events that must have led to the origins of the stars. The first stars have been assumed to be high-mass and to shine especially brightly. However, the latest observations point to hitherto unknown phenomena in the young universe, allowing for the emergence of much smaller stars. This conclusion is suggested by analyses in part conducted at the State Observatory Königstuhl and at the Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, both of which belong to the ZAH.
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Kann es nicht noch ältere Sterne geben deren
Licht uns noch nicht erreicht hat weil sie 20 Mrd Lichtjahre entfernt sind.
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A collaboration of physicists and a mathematician has made a significant step toward unifying general relativity and quantum mechanics by explaining how space-time emerges from quantum entanglement in a more fundamental theory. The paper announcing the discovery by Hirosi Ooguri, a Principal Investigator at the University of Tokyo’s Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU), with Caltech mathematician Matilde Marcolli and graduate students Jennifer Lin and Bogdan Stoica, will be published in Physical Review Letters as an Editors’ Suggestion “for the potential interest in the results presented and on the success of the paper in communicating its message, in particular to readers from other fields.”
How Spacetime is built by Quantum Entanglement: New Insight into Unification of General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics. 27 May 2015 Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The University of Tokyo. A collaboration of physicists and a mathematician has made a significant ...
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When you're blasting though space at more than 98 percent of the speed of light, you may need driver's insurance. Astronomers have discovered for the first time a rear-end collision between two high-speed knots of ejected matter from a super-massive black hole. This discovery was made while piecing together a time-lapse movie of a plasma jet blasted from a supermassive black hole inside a galaxy located 260 million light-years from Earth.

The finding offers new insights into the behaviour of "light-saber-like" jets that are so energized that they appear to zoom out of black holes at speeds several times the speed of light. This "superluminal" motion is an optical illusion due to the very fast real speed of the plasma, which is close to the universal maximum of the speed of light.
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#asknasa would it be possible to travel to the stars in less than thousands of years? I know we can't with current technology, but in the future? 
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Supernovas just might be the cleaning service of the universe.
It seems these explosions that mark the end of a star’s life work hand-in-hand with supermassive black holes to sweep out gas and shut down galaxies’ star-forming factories.

Recent research, led by Michigan State University astronomers, finds that the black holes located at the cores of galaxies launch fountains of charged particles, which can stir up gas throughout the galaxy and temporarily interrupt star formation.
Supernovas just might be the cleaning service of the universe. MSU-led research finds that these explosions that mark the end of a star's life work hand-in-hand with supermassive black holes to sweep out gas and shut down galaxies' star-forming factories.
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Queen’s University PhD student Matt Shultz is researching magnetic, massive stars, and his research has uncovered questions concerning the behaviour of plasma within their magnetospheres.
Drawing upon the extensive dataset assembled by the international Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) collaboration, led by Mr. Shultz’s supervisor, Queen’s professor Gregg Wade, along with some of his own observations collected with both the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope, Mr. Shultz is conducting the first systematic population study of magnetosphere-host stars.
Queen’s University PhD student Matt Shultz is researching magnetic, massive stars, and his research has uncovered questions concerning the behaviour o...
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Happy Towel Day
 
“The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy has a few things to say on the subject of towels…”  ESA astronaut +Samantha Cristoforetti marks #TowelDay on the International Space Station #TheAnswerIs42

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TpQfWLkKbhw
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