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Thorfinn Hrolfsson
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A group of researchers from Ehime University, Princeton University, and the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) among others has performed an extensive search for Dust Obscured Galaxies (DOGs) using data obtained from the Subaru Strategic Program with Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC). HSC is a new wide-field camera mounted at the prime focus of the Subaru Telescope and is an ideal instrument for searching for this rare and important class of galaxy. The research group discovered 48 DOGs, and has measured how common they are. Since DOGs are thought to harbour a rapidly growing black hole in their centres, these results give us clues for understanding the evolution of galaxies and super-massive black holes.
Press Release. Discovering Dust-Obscured Active Galaxies as They Grow. August 26, 2015. Abstract. A group of researchers from Ehime University, Princeton University, and the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) among others has performed an extensive search for Dust Obscured ...
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Excellent info! Thanks for the post!
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The research confirms rapid brightening events in otherwise normal pulsating white dwarfs, which are stars in the final stage of their life cycles.
In addition to the regular rhythm from pulsations they expected on the white dwarf PG1149+057, which cause the star to get a few percent brighter and fainter every few minutes, the researchers also observed something completely unexpected every few days: arrhythmic, massive outbursts, which broke the star's regular pulse and significantly heated up its surface for many hours.

The discovery was made possible by using the planet-hunting spacecraft Kepler, which stares unblinkingly at a small patch of sky, uninterrupted by clouds or sunrises.

Led by Dr JJ Hermes of the University of Warwick’s Astrophysics Group, the astronomers targeted the Kepler spacecraft on a specific star in the constellation Virgo, PG1149+057, which is roughly 120 light years from Earth.
Some dying stars suffer from 'irregular heartbeats', research led by astronomers at the University of Warwick has discovered. The research confirms rapid brightening events in otherwise normal pulsating white dwarfs, which are stars in the final stage of their life cycles.
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Of course, the article headline couldn't describe the same way you did in the first sentence there. They had to put out some prose. :-) 
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If dark energy is hiding in our midst in the form of hypothetical particles called “chameleons,” Holger Müller and his team at UC Berkeley plan to flush them out.

The results of an experiment reported in this week’s issue of Science narrows the search for chameleons a thousand times compared to previous tests, and Müller, an assistant professor of physics, hopes that his next experiment will either expose chameleons or similar ultralight particles as the real dark energy, or prove they were a will-o’-the-wisp after all.

Dark energy was first discovered in 1998 when scientists observed that the universe was expanding at an ever increasing rate, apparently pushed apart by an unseen pressure permeating all of space and making up about 68 percent of the energy in the cosmos. Several UC Berkeley scientists were members of the two teams that made that Nobel Prize-winning discovery, and physicist Saul Perlmutter shared the prize.
Physicists search for deviations from normal gravity
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What's really interesting is if they don't find it. 
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Thorfinn Hrolfsson

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The blog of George R.R. Martin discussing the Hugo Awards Nominations for 2015.  This year the nominations have been heavily politicised.

And the results http://www.thehugoawards.org/content/pdf/2015HugoStatistics.pdf a win for fandom.
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I'm looking forward to seeing his LJ when he updates it post-WC.
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HYODO Ryuki, a second-year student in the Doctoral Program, and Professor OHTSUKI Keiji of the Graduate School of Science at Kobe University have revealed that Saturn’s F ring and its shepherd satellites are natural outcome of the final stage of formation of Saturn’s satellite system. Their finding has been published online in Nature Geoscience on August 17.

Saturn, which is the second largest planet in our solar system, is known to have multiple rings and satellites. In 1979, Pioneer 11 discovered the F ring located just outside the main ring system that extends tens of thousands of kilometres. The F ring is very narrow with a width of only a few hundred kilometres, and has two shepherd satellites called Prometheus and Pandora, which orbit inside and outside the ring, respectively. Although the Voyager and Cassini spacecraft later made detailed observations of the F ring and its shepherd satellites, their origin has not been clarified.
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Very nice article.I  didnt know  about the  satelites  of the F  ring.
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The team of international scientists involved in the project demonstrated the sensitivity of their detector and recorded results that challenge several dark matter models and a long standing claim of dark matter detection. Papers detailing the results will be published in upcoming issues of the journals Science and Physical Review Letters.

Dark matter is an abundant but unseen matter in the universe considered responsible for the gravitational force that keeps the Milky Way galaxy together, said Rafael Lang, an assistant professor of physics at Purdue University who was involved in the research.

"Our galaxy spins like an incredibly fast merry-go-round, and the stars, planets and other objects would go flying off in different directions if it wasn't for gravitational pull," he said. "When we calculate the gravity of every known mass, it is nowhere near enough force to keep the galaxy together. Dark matter is the stuff that makes up the difference."

Although the team did not detect dark matter, the capabilities demonstrated by the XENON100 detector are encouraging. The high sensitivity shown in the experimental results could free the international research team from the need to constrain analysis to only a portion of the data captured, Lang said.

web site:-
http://www.xenon1t.org/
Results of the XENON100 experiment are a bright spot in the search for dark matter.
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Using results from the Herschel Astrophysical Terrahertz Large-Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) project, we show that, for galaxy masses above ≃ 108 M⊙, 51 per cent of the stellar mass-density in the local Universe is in early-type galaxies (ETGs; Sérsic n > 2.5) while 89 per cent of the rate of production of stellar mass-density is occurring in late-type galaxies (LTGs; Sérsic n < 2.5). From this zero-redshift benchmark, we have used a calorimetric technique to quantify the importance of the morphological transformation of galaxies over the history of the Universe. The extragalactic background radiation contains all the energy generated by nuclear fusion in stars since the big bang. By resolving this background radiation into individual galaxies using the deepest far-infrared survey with the Herschel Space Observatory and a deep near-infrared/optical survey with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and using measurements of the Sérsic index of these galaxies derived from the HST images, we estimate that ≃83 per cent of the stellar mass-density formed over the history of the Universe occurred in LTGs. The difference between this value and the fraction of the stellar mass-density that is in LTGs today implies there must have been a major transformation of LTGs into ETGs after the formation of most of the stars.

Authors Stephen Eales, Andrew Fullard, Matthew Allen, M. W. L. Smith, Ivan Baldry, Nathan Bourne, C. J. R. Clark, Simon Driver, Loretta Dunne, Simon Dye. Alister W. Graham, Edo Ibar, Andrew Hopkins, Rob Ivison, Lee S. Kelvin, Steve Maddox, Claudia Maraston, Aaron S. G. Robotham, Dan Smith, Edward N. Taylor, Elisabetta Valiante, Paul van der Werf, Maarten Baes, Sarah Brough, David Clements, Asantha Cooray, Haley Gomez, Jon Loveday, Steven Phillipps, Douglas Scott and Steve Serjeant.
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Awesome!!!
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Thorfinn Hrolfsson

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New research from a team led by Carnegie’s Robert Hazen predicts that Earth has more than 1,500 undiscovered minerals and that the exact mineral diversity of our planet is unique and could not be duplicated anywhere in the cosmos.

Minerals form from novel combinations of elements. These combinations can be facilitated by both geological activity, including volcanoes, plate tectonics, and water-rock interactions, and biological activity, such as chemical reactions with oxygen and organic material.
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The world is billions of years old, our galaxy is billions of years old, we adapted with this planet, I don't know where the first of us came from or from what, but I can tell you that the fact of the article is that we are unique based on this outlook, you don't need to be a wizard a scientist or a bible thumper to understand that. If there is any other life out there (the universe is life to my perspective so it's already been proven to be out there) it is just as 'sacred' as ours. Period. Thanks for the talk, I really like hitting the fourth wall
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Tiny beads of volcanic glass found on the lunar surface during the Apollo missions are a sign that fire fountain eruptions took place on the Moon’s surface. Now, scientists from Brown University and the Carnegie Institution for Science have identified the volatile gas that drove those eruptions.

Fire fountains, a type of eruption that occurs frequently in Hawaii, require the presence of volatiles mixed in with the erupting lava. Volatile compounds turn into gas as the lavas rise from the depths. That expansion of that gas causes lava to blast into the air once it reaches the surface, a bit like taking the lid off a shaken bottle of soda.
Evidence of lunar fire fountains Fire fountains — dramatic, explosive volcanic eruptions — require volatile elements mixed in with lava. New research by Alberto Saal and colleagues suggests that carbon monoxide was the volcanic gas that drove lunar fire fountains. Photo: Mike Cohea/Brown ...
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It is one of the most intriguing questions in astrochemistry: the mystery of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a collection of about 400 absorption bands that show up in spectra of light that reaches the earth after having traversed the interstellar medium. Despite intense research efforts over the last few decades, an assignment of the DIBs has remained elusive, although indications exist that they may arise from the presence of large hydrocarbon molecules in interstellar space. Recent experiments at the Max Born Institute lend novel credibility to this hypothesis.
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The majority of the mass in the Universe remains unknown. Despite knowing very little about this dark matter, its overall abundance is precisely measured. In other words: Physicists know it is out there, but they have not yet detected it.

It is definitely worth looking for, argues Ian Shoemaker, former postdoctoral researcher at Centre for Cosmology and Particle Physics Phenomenology (CP3), Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, now at Penn State, USA.
Physicists suggest a new way to look for dark matter: They beleive that dark matter particles annihilate into so-called dark radiation when they collide. If true, then we should be able to detect the signals from this radiation.
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Not that it doesn't have structure, but that it's vibrational frequency is different to that of our own dimension. So, its not perceivable in our current state. Rather, it is not able to be measured currently looking at it in the same way we view matter of our dimension. Though it is measurable and is proven to exist because of the fact that it indeed does affect the matter that is of our frequency (our dimension). We know its there because it directly affects what is all around it, our dimension.

Perhaps one day, we may find a means to manipulate this energy or matter if you will, in dimension somehow. But, I don't see that happening until we properly learn how to perceive and understand, how to properly manipulate and move matter of our own dimension into higher frequencies. Achieving the ability to transcend to these higher dimensions all around us. I believe this must come first, and we need to be able to properly and fully understand all that is of the higher dimension affecting our own, before we can manipulate or affect this matter/energy that is indeed all around us and measurable within our own dimension.

Electrogravitic phenomena that we are only just beginning to understand and research, I think is the forefront to the coming understanding. These happenings for example, black holes, electromagnetic fields, magnetic reconnection, magnetic portals, gravitational fields.

I believe these things are holding the keys to our understanding of the future. Of time, space, matter, anti matter, dimensions, the world that is really all around us. That we are yet to fully understand & properly perceive.

We are mere infants in the broad scale of what is all around us. We have so much still to learn and discover. We know nothing, yet. 
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Researchers using the IceCube Neutrino Observatory have sorted through the billions of subatomic particles that zip through its frozen cubic-kilometre-sized detector each year to gather powerful new evidence in support of 2013 observations confirming the existence of cosmic neutrinos.

The evidence is important because it heralds a new form of astronomy using neutrinos, the nearly massless high-energy particles generated in nature’s accelerators: black holes, massive exploding stars and the energetic cores of galaxies. In the new study, the detection of 21 ultra high-energy muons — secondary particles created on the very rare occasions when neutrinos interact with other particles —provides independent confirmation of astrophysical neutrinos from our galaxy as well as cosmic neutrinos from sources outside the Milky Way.

web site:-
http://icecube.wisc.edu/gallery/press/view/1964
This photo illustration shows one of the highest-energy neutrino events of this study superimposed on a view of the IceCube Lab (ICL) at the South Pole. Evidence of the neutrinos heralds a new form of astronomy. Courtesy of IceCube Collaboration. Researchers using the IceCube Neutrino ...
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