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M. Laura Moazedi
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Diversity & Inclusion
Diversity & Inclusion

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"Do leftover women really deserve our sympathy? Girls with an average or ugly appearance … hope to further their education in order to increase their competitiveness. The tragedy is they don't realise that, as women age, they are worth less and less, so by the time they get their MA or PhD, they are already old, like yellowed pearls."
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"I saw it in Berlin ... One by one he attacked each minority and he split them off one from the other. These men were all fellow Germans when they came here today. Now they were split into rival groups suspicious of each other, hating each other. They were being swindled, all of them. But the man who was really being fooled was Hans. He was pure German, according to Nazi standards. To him they promised everything and he fell for it. That's how Hans became a Superman. They gave him a uniform and they pumped up his ego. He wasn't just a little fellow off to work any more, he was a member of the master race... And so for all practical purposes, truth had been abolished in Germany. ... We must never let ourselves be divided by race or colour or religion because in this country we all belong to minority groups. ... You see, here in America it's not a question whether we tolerate minorities. America is minorities. ... Let's forget about we and they. Let's think about us."
Don't Be a Sucker! (1943)
Don't Be a Sucker! (1943)
moazedi.blogspot.com
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Parking cars in Naples
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I was looking through old news articles for my family-history research, I came across an article on bills before the Virginia House and Senate.

One, a 1861 bill to “ameliorate the condition of deaf, dumb, and blind negroes”, which had been suggested by a relation of mine William Steptoe Langhorne who was, himself blind (a hereditary condition that had been passed from his mother to him and several brothers and sisters, as well as a number of his and their offspring).

However, if you read the article in full, it noted that the House was “principally engaged on the bill for the voluntary enslavement of the free negroes of the Commonwealth”...

What???

Yes... This was a bill and it passed.

I was stunned.

In fact, there was an 1856 bill that predated this bill that made it legal for freed slaves or free-born blacks to voluntarily become enslaved. To our modern eyes, it makes to sense. Why would someone willingly “volunteer” to be a slave?

In fact, after the 1861 bill passed, at least 110 people petitioned the Commonwealth to become slaves.

“...it was better than either leaving their homes and families forever, as was required of free blacks whose family’s freedom did not predate Virginia’s 1806 emancipation law, or being charged with residing illegally in Virginia for more than a year after their emancipation, a crime that could lead to being sold at auction to the highest bidder.” (See the Journal of Southern History review of a book, below)

The Act:
Transcription from Original
Chap. 26.—An ACT for the Voluntary Enslavement of Free Negroes, without compensation to the Commonwealth.
Passed March 28, 1861.

1. Be it enacted by the general assembly, that it shall be lawful for free persons of color, or persons of color who have heretofore or may hereafter be manumitted, to appear before the circuit court of any county or corporation in which such free persons of color or manumitted slaves may have resided for twelve months, and make application thereto to select a master or mistress, and become slaves.

2. Upon the application of such free persons of color or manumitted slaves before the circuit court of said county or corporation, and the person they wish to choose as master or mistress, the court shall proceed to examine each party separately, as well as such other persons as said court may see fit. At any examination, the attorney for the commonwealth shall be present and see that such examination is properly conducted, and that no injustice is done to the applicant.

3. If upon examination the court shall be satisfied that there is no fraud or collusion between the parties, and that there is no good reason to the contrary, the court shall have the power to grant the application, without any compensation to the commonwealth, provided the court shall be satisfied that the person so chosen is of good character: but the individual or individuals thus chosen master or mistress, or some one for them, shall enter into bonds with approved security, in such penalty as the court may prescribe, with condition that the said negroes shall not become chargeable to any county or corporation in this commonwealth, and that the master or mistress thus chosen shall pay the debts and liabilities of such negro or negroes existing before the enslavement: provided, that if at any time thereafter such slave shall be convicted of any offence, for which by law he or she shall be condemned to suffer death, or to be sold or transported, the commonwealth shall not be liable to pay the owner of such slave any portion of his or her value. But no such order shall be made until the court shall be satisfied, by personal examination of the said negro, that he fully understands the nature and object of the proceedings, and that the act on his part is free and voluntary.

4. Upon the enslavement of such mother having children, and if there be no mother, then upon the enslavement of the father having children, the master or mistress thus chosen shall be required to have and to take the custody, control and services of such of the children of said father or mother as are free, until the females arrive at the age of eighteen, and the males at the age of twenty-one, and shall pay for his or her services at the expiration thereof, so much and for

such years as the said court may order. For such payment, bond shall be taken of the master in court, in such penalty and with such surety as the court may deem sufficient.
5. The proceedings in such cases shall be entered of record, and the property in said negroes as slaves shall, from the time of such entry, vest in the person or persons chosen as master or mistress, and his or her rights and liabilities and the condition of the applicants shall in all respects be the same as though said negroes had been slaves.

6. The master or mistress of any free negro heretofore voluntarily enslaved shall have the same right to the custody, control and services of any infant child or children, and upon the same terms as herein before provided for, if any, of such negro so enslaved, as is herein provided for; but before the said master or mistress shall be entitled to the custody, control and services of such child or children, he or she shall appear before a court of record, and make claim to such custody, control and services; which claim shall be entered of record; but if any such negro child has been heretofore bound out by the overseers of the poor of any county or corporation, the articles of indenture shall in no wise be affected hereby.

7. All acts and part of acts inconsistent with the provisions of this act are hereby repealed.

8. The cost of the proceedings shall be paid by the master or mistress.

9. This act shall be in force from its passage.

https://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/An_ACT_for_the_Voluntary_Enslavement_of_Free_Negroes_without_compensation_to_the_Commonwealth_March_28_1861

Family Bonds: Free Blacks and Re-enslavement Law in Antebellum Virginia. By Ted Maris-Wolf. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2015. Pp. [xii], 324. Paper, $39.95, ISBN 978-1-4696-2007-7.)

Ted Maris-Wolf’s Family Bonds: Free Blacks and Re-enslavement Law in Antebellum Virginia is notable for its narrow scope and broad ambitions. The book focuses on an unusual law passed by the Virginia legislature in 1856 and revised in 1861 that allowed free blacks to petition to be sold into slavery to a master of their own choosing. This option may not sound attractive, but for at least 110 people who petitioned under this law, it was better than either leaving their homes and families forever, as was required of free blacks whose family’s freedom did not predate Virginia’s 1806 emancipation law, or being charged with residing illegally in Virginia for more than a year after their emancipation, a crime that could lead to being sold at auction to the highest bidder. However, such an outcome was unlikely; Maris-Wolf’s meticulous research uncovered only one person in Virginia, Mary Dunmore, who was involuntarily sold into slavery after 1856.

Maris-Wolf’s goal is far more ambitious than simply writing the collective biographies of a handful of unusual people facing a terrible dilemma. Instead, he hopes to use these petitions to help historians think more carefully about slavery itself. Slavery, according to Maris-Wolf, was “adaptable, even amorphous,” and the story of the 1856 law reveals how whites and blacks used and shaped the peculiar institution in surprising ways (p. 130). For example, the 1856 law was not championed by fire-eaters but was inspired by Andrew Doswell and Willis Doswell, two black men freed in 1842, who, with the help of powerful neighbors, petitioned the legislature for an act allowing their voluntary enslavement to their landlord, the nephew of their former master. The act that provided for their enslavement became the model not only for the 1856 law but also for voluntary enslavement laws throughout the South.
Maris-Wolf goes further than the evidentiary record when he describes Andrew and Willis Doswell as the “fathers of Virginia’s first self-enslavement law,” but his argument that free blacks and their white allies used the voluntary enslavement law to their advantage is convincing (p. 97). In about a third of the cases, this law provided a handy form of legal insurance: free blacks living in Virginia illegally could file a petition for voluntary enslavement and then fail to appear in court. In such a case, the petition would have no effect because the court could not act until it had examined the free black petitioner. If the free black person who had filed a petition was later charged with violating the 1806 law, then the petition for enslavement could be revived, thus preventing prosecution under the 1806 law. Although some people used the law as a legal maneuver, the majority of the free blacks who petitioned to be enslaved did surrender their freedom. They did this in order to remain with their families and maintain their place in the community under the ownership of a person of their choosing. Maris-Wolf’s enthralling stories—of slave women who were granted freedom upon the death of their children’s father, of men who traveled to Liberia and decided to return to Virginia, of a successful free black entrepreneur whose businesses flourished during his second enslavement—all remind even the most jaded scholars that [End Page 425] the most peculiar things about the antebellum world are the varied ways that whites and blacks, slaves and free people, experienced slavery.

https://muse.jhu.edu/article/617014

Below, the 1861 news article mentioning my relation. A news article about a woman who chose voluntary enslavement, under the 1856 law. It isn’t known why she chose enslavement.
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Today's wake up word is proprioception. From the Latin proprius, meaning "one's own", "individual", and capio, capere, to take or grasp. it is the sense of the relative position of one's own parts of the body and strength of effort being employed in movement. This sense, sometimes called a body map, can be extended to things like a garden tool, a car, or an artificial limb.

Amputees Feel as Though Their Prosthetic Limb Belongs to Their Own Body

https://neurosciencenews.com/prosthetic-body-mapping-9694/
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Between 2007 and 2016, crime against women rose 83% in India alone. In 2016 - again, in India alone - 40.000 rapes were reported. 70% of sexual harassment victims do not report their cases. Girls are molested in school, women raped by taxi drivers, teens trafficked and sold to brothels.
India. No Country for Women.
India. No Country for Women.
moazedi.blogspot.com
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