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Stable Micro Systems
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Innovation, Education & Application Experts in the field of Texture Analysis
Innovation, Education & Application Experts in the field of Texture Analysis

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Researchers at University College, Cork, have been investigating the effect of 3D printing on the structure and texture of processed cheese and published a paper entitled “Effect of 3D printing on the structure and textural properties of processed cheese”. A commercially-available processed cheese was melted and printed using a modified commercial 3D printer by controlled deposition, with its properties compared to untreated and melted samples. Texture profile analysis (TPA) was conducted on refrigerated cheese cylinders using a Stable Micro Systems TA-XT2i texture analyser. The recorded TPA indicators were hardness, adhesiveness, springiness, cohesiveness and resilience. 3D printing was found to substantially change the properties of processed cheese, possibly offering new applications for tailoring structures using this novel process. More information: http://bit.ly/2lXmWj8
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If you're still not sure how to employ a Texture Analyser in your business then you might like to read this summary article in Food Manufacturing: 'The Role of Texture Analysis in the Food Industry'. Texture, flavour and appearance are key factors which influence food sampling, buying and repurchase. While flavour and appearance are well established in the sphere of quality control, texture is a relative newcomer in the determination of product acceptability. Orally, visually, manually – texture is assessed in many ways to determine a wide range of properties: hardness, cohesiveness, springiness, adhesiveness, fracturability and chewiness. Major food companies routinely apply texture analysis techniques both in new product development and as part of quality control in finished processed foods. Read more: http://bit.ly/2dRlU9c
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New Safety Screen for the only Texture Analyser with safety in mind: A protective screen is sometimes a necessary accessory to protect the operator in the event of sample fragments leaving the test area during a test. A Safety Screen is now available for operator protection from such fragments or violent failures of specimens such as hard and brittle materials that may shatter or create projectiles upon failure. In addition, there are instruments used by multiple and/or unskilled operators that may prefer the installation of such a screen for an extra degree of operator safety. The screen is constructed of a strong yet lightweight acrylic panel which allows clear observation during a test whilst minimising weight. An interlock mechanism requires that the screen is at its lowest ‘closed’ position prior to starting a test. The screen has dampers which enable the panel to remain at any lifted position without dropping down. The design is such that the screen works within the existing footprint of the Texture Analyser with no additional bench space required: http://bit.ly/2rcfjM5
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Using Novelty Gels in New Food Product Development
Choosing the optimum texture analysis test method to measure your new texture creations Exciting new food textures will be among the emerging trends over the next three years, together with more ‘playful’ products for adults and more widespread use of edible packaging, according to a leading food futurologist. 

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Last year, 15% of new food products that were launched in Europe had some sort of unique texture combination, according to a study by Mintel. Food manufacturing insiders also said that in the U.S., there were quite a number of texture-heavy launches. Ingredion published a report that showed how food and beverage manufacturers are developing fresh concepts that appeal to an evolving base of consumers, with texture being a major trend. Food analysts have taken notice and have recognised a rise in texture analysis throughout the food industry, infiltrating everything from dairies to meat processing plants to bakeries. It's possible that consumers associate complex textures with higher-quality, healthy ingredients, an off-shoot of consumer desire for premium products. Read more: http://bit.ly/2k1p1d5
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Scientists from Wageningen University have been researching the effects of oral processing time and taste intensity on satiation and have recently released a paper entitled “Comparison of oro-sensory exposure duration and intensity manipulations on satiation”. Participants in the study consumed one of four gel-based model foods until they were full. Model foods were offered freely and differed in texture (soft or hard texture, yielding shorter and longer oral processing time) and sweetness (low or high intensity). They all had equal calorific content and were matched for flavour and palatability. The amount of food and number of chews were both measured. A Stable Micro Systems TA.XTplus was used to monitor the mechanical properties of the four gels. A 75mm steel probe was used to compress cylinders of each gel, to give fracture stress, fracture strain, fracture work and modulus. Read more: http://bit.ly/2mgIcD6
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As you sit down for your next meal, think about this: what are the elements of flavour? According to the standard international definition used by food manufacturers and marketers, there are three: taste, smell and texture (sometimes called “mouthfeel”). But growing evidence suggests flavour has a fourth dimension, which interacts with the other three: colour. And not only the colour of the food itself, but of food ads. The expected texture of food has found to be strongly influenced by this colour, so advertisers are advised: “Know the textural cues of colour, and make sure the palette and words you use both line up with the texture you’re trying to convey.” See more at: http://bit.ly/2lXKL9I
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Victor Matthew Phillips et al have recently filed a patent entitled “Flowable hemostatic gel composition and its methods of use”, regarding a flowable hemostatic gel composition for use at a site of a defect within a biological tissue. The composition includes a flowable gel solution with a biopolymer dissolved in a solvent, configured to cross-link with red blood cells at the site to facilitate clot formation, as well as an active agent. To assess bio-adhesion, a bioadhesion probe was developed for the Stable Micro Systems TA.XTplus. A gel mucoadhesion probe was mounted onto a custom built bracket, and traditional mucoadhesion testing was performed using pork loin to represent typical human muscle tissue. Read more: http://bit.ly/2ndRsplpl
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Physical Analysis: Putting Cosmetics Packaging to the Test
The development of cosmetics for release into a competitive market is a high cost endeavour, so it would be inefficient for these high stakes products to be shipped in low quality packaging, or for the container to degrade during its
shelf life...

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Hair care claims are getting bolder. Putting aside hair regrowth claims, hair care claims have begun to mirror skin care claims, transitioning from cosmetic to structure-function. Claims such as protects against future damage, hair repair, thickening, strengthening and moisturisation have become the norm, but can they be substantiated? Cosmetic companies will need to support these claims, in light of increased claims scrutiny, especially in the EU, with strong scientific substantiation. See more at: http://buff.ly/2pXD0G1
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