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Andrew Robertson
Attended University of Birmingham
Lived in Bath
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Andrew Robertson

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Damn right! (Also applies to non-female offspring)
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+Andrew Robertson - yes, I agree. Since my daughters arrived, I've cringed repeatedly at Society's apparently-infinite amusement at the idea that fathers are bound to act as gatekeepers for their daughters' sexuality ("Oh my, you'll be beating the boys off with a stick, etc., etc.") And honestly, my taking offense at the idea relates less to feminist outrage and more to the sense that this cartoonish paternal trope shares DNA with other cringeworthy memes that mock the 'paterfamilias' in every dimension of domestic life: i.e., the father who would 'beat boys off with a stick' is also the inept 'Dagwood' is also the cuckold of The Miller's Tale -- all victims of the (patently-false) assumption that they're masters of their chaotic human establishments.
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Andrew Robertson

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A metaphor for the last 12 months of my research...

So, after weeks of trying a new setup I finally get it to just about work... then the pump breaks down.

Drunk man, I feel your pain.
 
The best YouTube video I've seen all week. The music is perfect.
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So, who wants to share this?
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Absolutely, which is why gun enthusiasts may actually share it.
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Have him in circles
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Andrew Robertson

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Read +John Baez' original comments
 
The Wall Street Journal chose David Berlinski to write an editorial against the new IPCC report on climate change.  An interesting choice!

He says that most climate scientists are “intellectual mediocrities and pious charlatans".  But that's not all.   He's part of the intelligent design movement - which, in case you didn't notice, supports a watered-down form of creationism.    But while most of those guys try to act scientific, he comes out explicitly against science.  Or at least against the 'arrogance' of science.  In fact he's appeared in a film called The Arrogance of the Sciences.

In his book The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and Its Scientific Pretensions, he wrote:

A great many men and women have a dull, hurt, angry sense of being oppressed by the sciences. They are frustrated by endless scientific boasting. They suspect that the scientific community holds them in contempt. They are right to feel this way.

He also appeared in the film Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed, which argues that the mainstream science establishment suppresses academics who find evidence of intelligent design in nature... and said:

It'd be nice to see the scientific establishment lose some of its prestige and power.

In short: he's trying to use resentment against science to fight against the IPCC, evolutionary biology... and even particle physics!  Yes, he's written an article saying the Higgs boson isn't such a big deal:

• David Berlinski, The ineffable Higgs, Evolution News and Viewshttp://www.evolutionnews.org/2012/11/surely_its_disc066461.html

For more about his Wall Street Journal article, read:

• Steven T. Corneliussen, Wall Street Journal opinion video: “The Arrogance of the Sciences”, PhysicsToday, http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/magazine/physicstoday/news/10.1063/PT.5.8041
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+John Baez' comments are not on the rightness or wrongness of what David Berlinski is saying but on the continuing habit of newspapers to present quacks as having an authoritative opinion on scientific matters.

If a newspaper were to ask a homeopath to write an editorial on the benefits, or otherwise, of vaccines, we can be sure up front that's a bad choice. He/she may have actually drawn sound conclusions based on all the available evidence but it's extraordinarily unlikely (and certainly out of character). We know this person has a track record of cherry picking only the facts that suit their faith and artfully dressing it up with a few bits of genuine science to make it sound convincing.

Presenting the opinions of people that are openly anti-science as anything other than such is to be deliberately misleading. The introduction from the WSJ's video interview with Berlinski:

"Today on uncommon knowledge, David Berlinski, mathematician, philosopher and essayist. In one brilliant, elegant book after another, Dr Berlinski has attacked global warming, Darwin and other scientific pretensions..."

Difficult to make a clearer endorsement than that.
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Andrew Robertson

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Those who don't learn from the mistakes of history are doomed to repeat them.

Past civilisations fell once a growing class of parasitic elites drew ever greater proportions of resources towards themselves, resulting in over consumption and an inability to cope with natural disasters such as changing climates.

Lucky that sort of thing couldn't happen today...
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By 'warp' I mean to change the price of a stock from the price that would otherwise be determined by traditional concepts of supply and demand: investors thinks a company will do well in the future, they buy the stock, if they think it won't do well they sell it. How much that all costs depends on how many other people want to buy it. This system benefits companies that perform well and penalises those that perform poorly, ultimately benefiting society as a whole.

In this case, by 'high frequency' I mean traders that use automated systems to buy stock milliseconds before an order arrives, meaning the price will rise in the instant before the genuine buyer can fullfill their order. The HF trader has no interest in the stock themselves, the price rises above the level otherwise dictated by the market and global investors lose billions.

http://blogs.marketwatch.com/thetell/2014/03/30/high-frequency-trading-hurts-regular-customers-michael-lewis-tells-60-minutes/
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Andrew Robertson

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 #UK
 
This is an utter travesty

If you're not doing experiments, you're not doing science, period.

You might be reading about it, you might be communicating it, you might even be teaching it but you're not doing it. This is a clear demonstration of how governments (in this case the UK government) are increasingly putting the cart before the horse by dropping education in favour of chasing exam result targets.

I'm so angry, I want to see the people responsible for this decision kicked out of the country. Where's the outcry from our scientific institutions?
Plan to end coursework in science A-levels described as 'death knell for UK science education' by Physiological Society
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"It makes no more sense to say that someone isn't doing science if he does one part of the job"

It's the goal. If one is producing work to be tested by experiment then one is taking part in science. If one is producing work as an exercise in (mathematical) logic and deduction, then one is performing natural philosophy. That hypotheses are usually tested by experiment at a later stage (often decades later) does not mean they are science before that point.

To take the farming analogy, is the manager of a large farming estate a farmer? He may have little knowledge of practical farming, and may not know which end of a cow the milk comes out. He still performs a crucial role in running the farm by appointing staff that can do all of these things and keeping up on the latest farming methods and policies, but is he farming? I would say he, personally, is managing, but that that management is one part of the overall effort of farming.
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Andrew Robertson

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Woh ho  hooo. Jack White you flippin' genius.

(And some very cool chemical physics to boot).

Turn up. Very loud.
The music video for "High Ball Stepper" – the first cut from Jack White's forthcoming solo album "Lazaretto" – is basically four minutes of blazing guitar riffs set to visuals of two notoriously trippy scientific phenomena.
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Chemical free drinks!
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Much my reaction to the current use of "organic" and similar terms.
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Have him in circles
1,720 people
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Occupation
Associate Professor of Chemistry
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Bath - Manchester - Birmingham UK - Fukuoka
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Introduction
Interests: Information/network theory, non-linear chemistry,  aikido.
Education
  • University of Birmingham
    PhD in Chemistry
  • UMIST
    BSc(Hons) in Chemistry with Computer-Aided Chemistry
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Male