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Anne Osterrieder
9,420 followers -
Plant cell biologist and science communicator. Easily amused.
Plant cell biologist and science communicator. Easily amused.

9,420 followers
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If you live near Oxford UK, come and have a go yourself! 

More info: http://www.brookes.ac.uk/about-brookes/news/live-friday-at-the-ashmolean/
This is an image of a section of bone taken with a Samsung Galaxy S4! A great test run for our mobile microscope stand for the Brookes 150/Ashmolean Live Friday event (March 14th). #livefriday #brookes150 #brookesmicroscopy
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Louise wrote a nice summary about our recent school microscopy workshop at Oxford Brookes University. 
Coloured SEM image showing the surface of Iris pollen. 

Oxford Brookes hosted a group of students from the Oxford Academy this morning. Part of their visit involved looking at flowers, the reproductive organs in the flowers and pollen using light microscopy. This was followed by demonstrations on our research microscopes,  +Anne Osterrieder showing them the confocal laser scanning microscopes while I demonstrated electron microscopy. this image was taken during the session and was coloured this afternoon. 

One thing I enjoy about talking to and showing younger students the microscopes is the interesting questions we end up getting asked, as well as the remarkable tangents the conversations are likely to take. Ghosts was one such unexpected topic, in between talking about human parasites, cells in the eye and live images from the microscopes showing pollen. Certainly an interesting morning. :)
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"An oozing, blob engulfs Tokyo. Mindlessly, it rapidly spreads, overcoming the surrounding cities in less than a day. Although this sounds like the plot of a science fiction movie, in another example of life being stranger than fiction, it was actually part of an experiment conducted back in 2009. Fortunately for the citizens of the great Japanese metropolis, Tokyo was represented by a miniature model on an agar plate. Further, the slimy blob was not the creation of some comic book super-villain, but in fact a species of slime mould, Physarum polycephalum."

Guest post on the Plant Scientist blog by Stuart King. 

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Our YouTube channel 'Musical Cells' now has its own Google+ page. Check it out if you like quirky cell biology music videos made by scientists and musicians! 

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Should scientists use social media for work purposes? What types of content can researchers put online and how can they make it reach even further? How to engage students via Twitter? How do you manage information overload?

I blogged about the workshop that I ran together with Dr Jeremy Pritchard for the Society for Experimental Biology's main meeting. 

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Prof M Dolores Rodriguez spoke at the Society for Experimental Biology's Women in Science dinner about the 'evolution' of communication in science. 

Do you still remember the first computers and how you sent manuscripts by post? Or did you not even realise that there once was a time without Google? Check out my write-up of this session to find out how advances in technology have affected science or to enjoy a bit of nostalgia. Maybe you'd like to share your memories here?

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This week I am live-blogging from the Society for Experimental Biology's annual meeting in Valencia. Here is a summary of the opening session, 'Science with Impact'. 

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This is a transcript of my three minute presentation at Science Oxford’s closing down event  ’Science Oxford versus the Rest of the World’. I drew the images with the iPad app ‘Paper by Fifty Three‘.

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Here is a sonnet about the Golgi apparatus, written by Tara Tai.

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These scientific 3D prints are so cool! I was lucky to be able to hold them in real life this morning. :)
More 3D prints of viruses. These prints are golf-ball size (5cm in diameter) and show an Astrovirus (left) and Adenovirus (right). The size of virus models are 1.6 and 0.5 million times (respectively) their actual size.
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