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Charleston Auto Repair
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You know that long belt that snakes around the front of your engine? It's called the serpentine belt. The serpentine belt is driven by the engine as it turns. It powers your alternator, air conditioning compressor, and power steering pump. On some vehicles it also runs the water pump, radiator fan, and power brakes. Sounds like a lot of stuff doesn't it?If your serpentine belt were to break on one of our roads, your battery would die in a few kilometers. If it runs your fan or water pump, your engine could overheat. And steering and braking could be more difficult. Obviously, the best thing is to replace your serpentine belt before it breaks.Check your owner's manual for when it's recommended that you replace your serpentine belt – or just ask your service advisor at Charleston Auto Repair by calling . He can inspect the belt as well to see if it's in trouble.You may have been told by a service advisor in to look for cracks in your belt to see if it needs to be replaced. Of course, cracks are still a concern, but modern belt material doesn't crack as often as old belts did. What we look for these days is the thickness of the belt. We have a special little tool at Charleston Auto Repair that measures the depth of the grooves in the belt to see if it needs replacing.A worn belt can slip or be misaligned, putting undue stress on the accessories it runs.Now you can imagine it's for the belt to be tight, so there's a tensioner pulley on your engine that puts pressure on the belt to keep it at the right tension. The spring on the tensioner wears out over time so we recommend replacing the tensioner pulley at the same time as the serpentine belt.Replacing your serpentine belt on schedule, or when an inspection warrants it, will keep you from an unexpected breakdown. - See more at: http://charlestonautorepair.napavision.com/2015/11/19/serpentine-belt#sthash.UGN7NzQZ.dpuf
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Did you know we're an Angie's List Super Service Award winner two years in a row? You can write us reviews via this link! Remember Angie's List members always get 10% off of repairs!

http://my.angieslist.com/angieslist/Review/486950
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In case you haven't heard yet, we now have our dealer license! We have a some great used cars for sale so if you're interested give Marty a call at 843-225-0360.
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The SC push for fuel economy has the benefit of using less gas as well as fewer emissions in our local Charleston environment. Cars and trucks run cleaner than ever.
Many people in the Charleston area may not realize that the first federally mandated pollution control device was in 1960: the PCV valve.
‘PCV’ stands for Positive Crankcase Ventilation. The crankcase is the lower part of the engine where the crankshaft is housed and where the engine oil lives. When fuel is burned in the engine some of the explosive gases from combustion squeeze past the pistons and down into the crankcase.
Now this gas is about 70 percent unburned fuel. If it were allowed to remain in the crankcase, it would contaminate the oil and quickly turn it to sludge. Sludge is like Vaseline and clogs passages in the engine leading to damage.
Also, the pressure build up would blow out seals and gaskets. In the old days, there was just a hose that vented the crankcase out into the air. Obviously, not good for the environment.
Enter the PCV valve. It’s a small, one-way valve that lets out the gases from the crankcase, and routes them back into the air intake system where can be re-burned in the engine.
As you might imagine, the valve gets gummed up over time. If you skip oil changes now and then, the PCV valve gets gummed up even faster. If the PCV valve is sticking you could have oil leaks. Fortunately, the PCV valve is very inexpensive to replace. Some can even be checked for function by your technician.
Manufacturer’s usually recommend they be changed somewhere between twenty and fifty thousand miles. Unfortunately, PCV valve replacement is left out of some owner’s manuals, so you may need to ask your service advisor.
Come down to Charleston Auto Repair and have us take a look at the condition of your PCV valve to ensure you are running at top efficiency. Just come by our service station in Charleston, SC 29414, or give us a call at 843.852.0318.
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Need tires? Check with us first and we'll give you a great price! Right now you can get up to $160 back with a mail-in rebate on a set of four Goodyear tires!
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New month equals new rebates! Come in today thru August 31st and receive a $5 to $25 rebate on batteries, starters and alternators! Every rebate we give NAPA will donate $2 to the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund and you can also donate your rebate as well!
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Just a reminder we will be closed Friday July 4th for Independence day. We hope you have a fun and safe holiday weekend!
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Check out our Napa AutoCare blog and schedule an appointment with us today!
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