Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Joanna Rickert-Hall (Town Crier)
51 followers -
History Truth Sleuth: Researcher, Teacher, Consultant
History Truth Sleuth: Researcher, Teacher, Consultant

51 followers
About
Joanna's posts

Post has attachment
Early education in Waterloo Region was enhanced by "an educated mulatto" named John Frederick Augustus Sykes Fayette who established the Wellington Institute in 1840

Post has attachment
John Frederick Augustus Sykes Fayette & The Wellington Institute
In earlier posts about local black settlement history of Waterloo County, I have noted that some were ex-slaves who came here with the hope and prospect of a better life that would free them from the chains of enslavement. Theirs is a powerful story that en...

Post has attachment
Photo

Post has attachment
Upcoming Black History Talk: Community Contributions of Early Waterloo County Black Settlers
Many are aware of the contributions of the Pennsylvania German Mennonites who came to settle and farm this area in the early 1800's but few know that their neighbours included hard-working men and women who had journeyed to Canada looking for refuge from th...

Post has attachment
Local History, Some Friends and Me: A Few Memories of the Work We Do
Thinking of Joseph Schneider Haus and the 1820 Log Schoolhouse in Waterloo Park:  Local History Vignette The lovely photo that appears in the video (of me doing the dreaded 19th century version of Wash Day Blues) was taken by a very talented local photograp...

Post has attachment
Joanna Rickert-Hall: Local History Vignette. Photo stills from Joseph Schneider Haus Museum and the 1820 Log Schoolhouse in Waterloo Park, Ontario. Includes a lovely photo of me doing laundry, 19th century style, by local photographer David Bebee. Enjoy!

Post has attachment
Fresh baked bread! Oh my! Fridays were once the scene of a weekly baking ritual whereby a woman did a week's worth of baking to produce enough bread to feed her family and any unexpected guests. Today we have mixes and even pre-made cookie and bread dough but nothing, and I mean nothing, tastes or smells like the real thing: home made bread!

Post has attachment
Let's make cheese the 19th Century way the Mennonites did it! And don't forget to drizzle some maple syrup on the finished product before serving it--YUM!

Post has attachment
Keeping Things Cool in the 19th Century, Pt. 2: Making Butter....A Long Process But So Worth It

Post has attachment
Gone but not forgotten, I've returned with more local stories and research!
Wait while more posts are being loaded