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Spring in Beijing
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Mark for later
 
Graphene foam functionalized with ZnO nanowires shows high selectivity for Parkinson's disease biomarkers.
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Whoa! Now there's a Google Glass for people who wear glasses: http://slate.me/Moal6S 
Do you consider yourself farsighted, but also happen to be near-sighted? Google may finally have a Glass for you. The company this morning unveiled a new line of wearable face computers that do something the originals couldn't: correct your vision. Prescription Glass comes in four different styles—“thin,” “split,” “bold,” and...
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nice pie chart~
 
Science Expert Deniers

Many users on the various Science Communities on Google+ wonder Why was I banned?, Why are my comments deleted?, or Why was my post quickly removed?. Quite often we, the moderators, are confronted by these users claiming that the moderators censor information outside of the mainstream scientific press. 

Yes, we do delete content that comes from outside the mainstream scientific press. We ban members that assert their opinion as fact even though the moderators, who are experts in their selected fields, continuously point them in the correct direction. I struggle to continuously argue the basics of climate change with individuals that receive their facts from Glenn Beck, Rush Limbaugh, and Sean Hannity. 

I am an expert in how water flows between the Atmosphere, Surface, and Subsurface because I have devoted the past decade learning Fluid Mechanics, Physical Hydrology, and Land Surface Interactions. My opinion on groundwater, climate change, and near-surface interactions counts more than the average layman. I reached my opinions by learning from the top research scientists and from my own personal research. 

Tom Nichols wrote an article titled The Death Of Expertise desribing exactly what happens on the various online communities and comment sections. In his conclusion he finished with 5 main points:

1-> We can all stipulate: the expert isn’t always right.

2-> But an expert is far more likely to be right than you are. On a question of factual interpretation or evaluation, it shouldn’t engender insecurity or anxiety to think that an expert’s view is likely to be better-informed than yours. (Because, likely, it is.)

3-> Experts come in many flavors. Education enables it, but practitioners in a field acquire expertise through experience; usually the combination of the two is the mark of a true expert in a field. But if you have neither education nor experience, you might want to consider exactly what it is you’re bringing to the argument.

4-> In any discussion, you have a positive obligation to learn at least enough to make the conversation possible. The University of Google doesn’t count. Remember: having a strong opinion about something isn’t the same as knowing something.

5-> And yes, your political opinions have value. Of course they do: you’re a member of a democracy and what you want is as important as what any other voter wants. As a layman, however, your political analysis, has far less value, and probably isn’t — indeed, almost certainly isn’t — as good as you think it is.

Sources:
The Death of Expertise -> http://thefederalist.com/2014/01/17/the-death-of-expertise/

Pie Chart on Climate Change -> http://www.jamespowell.org/
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its good to review those things from time to time
 
"La esencia de las matemáticas y la ciencia no es explicar problemas simples en forma complicada; es presentar enigmas complejos en forma simple".- AGORA
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It is slow...but still, it good that I can access G+ from Beijing. Thank you Xskywalker
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A parallel comparison between apple and blackberry
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战斗民族…
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ok..just have to share this one before i sign off... "Could you imagine coming home from work
To find this tiny creature napping on your couch with your dog?
Guess who came home for dinner?It followed this beagle home, right through the doggy door. This happened in Maryland recently. The owner came home to find the visitor had made himself right at home.. This hit the 6 o'clock news big time."
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像毛绒玩具一样
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3-D Graphene: Super-capacitors from sugar bubbles

Graphene sheets are immensely strong, lightweight and excellent at conducting electricity. Theoretically, macroscopical three-dimensional graphene assemblies should retain the properties of nanoscale graphene flakes. However, recent attempts to make 3D graphene have resulted in weak conductivity due to poor contact between graphene sheets. Loss of strength is also a problem, and self-supporting 3D graphene has not yet been produced.

Now, Xuebin Wang and Yoshio Bando at Japan's World Premier International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), together with co-workers across Japan and China, have created a new way of making 3D graphene using bubbles blown in a polymeric glucose solution. The resulting 3D graphene is robust and maintains excellent conductivity.

Inspired by the ancient food art of 'blown sugar', Bando and his team reasoned that the strutted, coherent nature of conjoined bubbles would lend itself to strength and conductivity if graphene could be structured in the same way. The researchers created a syrup of ordinary sugar and ammonium chloride. They heated the syrup, generating a glucose-based polymer called melanoidin, which was then blown into bubbles using gases released by the ammonium. The team found the best quality end-product resulted from a balance of equal ammonium decomposition and glucose polymerization during this stage.

As the bubbles grew, the remaining syrup drained out of the bubble walls, leaving within intersections of three bubbles. Under further heating, deoxidization and dehydrogenation, the melanoidin gradually graphitized to form 'strutted graphene': a coherent 3D structure made up of graphene membranes linked by graphene strut frameworks, which resulted from original bubble walls and intersectional skeletons respectively.

The bubble structure allows free movement of electrons throughout the network, meaning that the graphene retains full conductivity. Not only this, but the mechanical strength and elasticity of the 3D graphene is extraordinary robust- the team were able to compress it down to 80% of its original size with little loss of conductive properties or stability.

Following their discovery, Bando and his team reliably produced gram-level strutted 3D graphene with a cost $0.5 per gram in their lab. The low-cost, high scalability of this new method could have many applications in engineering and electronics. Selectively the abundant product was applied as a highly effective super-capacitor; its maximum-power-density is highest among 3D graphene-based aqueous super-capacitors, ca. 10^6 W/kg. This illuminates an amazing future for quick start-up of electric vehicles and launching of aircrafts.

http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2013/131216/ncomms3905/full/ncomms3905.html

Picture - No idea where I got it. 
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In his circles
140 people
Have him in circles
124 people
Gerald Hoye's profile photo
The Daily Show's profile photo
jing zhang's profile photo
Warren Huelsnitz's profile photo
Hong You's profile photo
rohit yadav's profile photo
Zhu Liang's profile photo
Selisa Graham's profile photo
Tham Tinh's profile photo
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