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Chris Mooney
Worked at Point of Inquiry Podcast
Attended Yale University
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Chris Mooney

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Yes, it really just snowed in Egypt.

But no, this photo was not taken in Egypt. http://www.motherjones.com/blue-marble/2013/12/egypt-snow-sphinx-photo-jet-stream
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Snow doesn't actually mean colder weather.  Egypt has many days during the winter that are near or below freezing, its just that they usually don't have the moisture in the air to form snow falls (it is a desert).  "global warming" changes the amount of moisture in the air and the patterns of precipitation distributed around the planet, thus we see snow where there isn't a historical precedent as well as unusual droughts in other areas.
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Chris Mooney

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The new episode of Inquiring Minds is up! +Indre Viskontas hosts a fascinating interview with psychologist Alison Gopnik, who studies the brains of babies and has found that it's really true: We all start out as scientists, as explorers, filled with questions, living life through experiments. Unfortunately, some of us forget.... http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2013/11/inquiring-minds-alison-gopnik-baby-einsteins 
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Not that some of us forget, we are made to forget. A large amount of the curiosity and thinking flexibility that a child retains as an adult depends on their upbringing.
What we adults must do is strive to preserve that natural curiosity and thinking flexibility in children, to a possible extent.
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Just announced the guest for tomorrow's episode of Inquiring Minds: It's Jonathan Haidt, bestelling author of The Righteous Mind, discussing the psychology of the Tea Party, why it caused the shutdown/debt ceiling crisis--and why a Republican crackup may be coming. https://www.facebook.com/inquiringmindspodcast/posts/1430127223873498
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Great book. Though the description here makes it seem like a partisan attack on Republicans which it is not. Definitely going to listen in. Thank you.
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The latest episode of Inquiring Minds is on a subject that I've wanted to discuss for a while: Do facts matter in the climate change debate? Or not? And does a message about "scientific consensus" sway conservatives? As it turns out, the evidence is mixed... http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2013/10/inquiring-minds-kahan-lewandowsky-communicate-climate
+Indre Viskontas +Dan Kahan a
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My new sci comm company, Ninja Communications, has just launched! We're on Facebook and Twitter, please like us! More info at links below:
www.ninjacoms.com
https://www.facebook.com/ninjacoms
https://twitter.com/Ninjacoms 
Here's a scene from a recent workshop:
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Congrats, Chris!
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Whoa! LA Times won't publish letters to the editor denying climate change any more. This is big. Just adding to the growing wave of anti-troll sentiment http://www.latimes.com/opinion/opinion-la/la-ol-climate-change-letters-20131008,0,871615.story
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I think it will be interesting to see how this plays out in practice.  As Paul Thornton admits, he is the letters editor, but not a science expert.  I'm sure that through the years many trollish letters on various topics have been eliminated from letters to the editor pages without getting this sort of blanket comment published (even though analogous policies may have existed).  But I think it would be detrimental to the public discourse if we are all isolated to our own private echo chambers.

As an alternative example:
In a recent exchange with our local denialist in residence, retired professor Don Easterbrook, The Bellingham Herald published all of the items below:
His influence with right wing politicians: http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2013/03/26/2939145/retired-wwu-professor-a-global.html#storylink=misearch
A public stand by members of his former department refuting his denialism:
http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2013/03/31/2943649/wwu-faculty-find-overwhelming.html#storylink=misearch

"We, the active faculty of the Geology Department at Western Washington University, express our unanimous and significant concerns regarding the views espoused by Easterbrook, who holds a doctorate in geology; they are neither scientifically valid nor supported by the overwhelming preponderance of evidence on the topic."

And even responses by Easterbrook and letters to the editor by his supporters (as well as detractors). 

I believe that there is a fine but important line between regulating real trolls and bringing viewpoints to the public attention that need to be openly aired and discussed.  While the denialists themselves are probably beyond convincing, it is still important to understand what they see as effective messaging to the general public so that we can plan messaging that addresses those very issues in a scientific manner.
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Chris Mooney

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Remember, all hurricanes and typhoons in November will be called #Kochnado to commemorate the anti-science climate denialism of the Koch brothers. 
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This is the most powerful thing I have read in some time. It should start a national movement, one that just might save America. And you don't say something like that very often http://www.salon.com/2013/10/20/a_modest_proposal_to_neutralize_gerrymandering/
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The desperate notion that a new way of counting votes will lead to different results. Nuts.
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On tomorrow's episode of Inquiring Minds: Does talking about the scientific consensus on climate change really work to change minds? +Indre Viskontas +Dan Kahan https://www.facebook.com/inquiringmindspodcast/posts/1428282710724616 
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My guess would be that a stale talking point of dubious provenance isn't going to convince anyone (though that's a testable hypothesis -- so test it!). I've been hearing this "97%" figure for many years, so if anything it forces me towards a more skeptical position. That said, bad messaging doesn't trump 150 years of greenhouse science -- energy balance, black bodies, electrical dipoles ... David Archer's lectures on YouTube (and new Coursera) are much more interesting than an argument from authority.
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Our new Inquiring Minds episode is now up with just announced Nobel Prize winner Randy Schekman, who has some pretty powerful things to say about the insane cost of higher education today. He's decided to speak out on this issue and, listening to him makes you seriously wonder whether the scientific talent of today is being crushed by student fees, student debt, postdoc holding patterns, and defunded laboratories. Listen at link below:
+Indre Viskontas 
http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2013/10/inquiring-minds-randy-schekman-college
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In his circles
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18,527 people
Work
Occupation
Journalist, Author, Lecturer, SciComm Trainer, Podcaster
Employment
  • Point of Inquiry Podcast
    Host
Basic Information
Gender
Male
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Introduction
Chris Mooney is a science and political journalist, blogger, podcaster, and experienced trainer of scientists in the art of communication. He is the author of four books, including the New York Times bestselling The Republican War on Science and the forthcoming The Republican Brain: The Science of Why They Deny Science and Reality (April 2012). He blogs for Science Progress, a website of the Center for American Progress and Center for American Progress Action Fund, and is a host of the Point of Inquiry podcast.
Education
  • Yale University
    english, 1995 - 1999
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