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Newseum
History Museum
Today 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
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Best seats in town for yesterday's Emancipation Day parade! #FanPhotoFriday
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We do weddings, too! #FanPhotoFriday
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We genuinely love how much people love this sign. #FanPhotoFriday
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Contact Information
Map of the business location
555 Pennsylvania Ave NW Washington, DC 20001
555 Pennsylvania Avenue NorthwestUSDistrict of ColumbiaWashington20001
(202) 292-6100newseum.org
History MuseumToday 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Monday 9:00 am – 5:00 pmTuesday 9:00 am – 5:00 pmWednesday 9:00 am – 5:00 pmThursday 9:00 am – 5:00 pmFriday 9:00 am – 5:00 pmSaturday 9:00 am – 5:00 pmSunday 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
A top museum attraction in the heart of Washington, D.C. We champion the First Amendment through education, information and entertainment.
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Have them in circles
95 people
Pams Bluemoon's profile photo
Yasser Al Fakharany's profile photo
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4.5
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4 star
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3 star
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2 star
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High-tech museum exploring journalism's past, present & future via interactive exhibits & films.- Google
"The Pulitzer Prize photo gallery could be a worthy museum in and of itself."
6 reviewers
"2) The documentary on "bias in journalism" is itself extraordinarily biased!"
4 reviewers
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Lisa Paquette
4 months ago
I have lived in DC for 9 years, and I think the Newseum is one of the best museums in the city! Of course we are spoiled here and don't have to pay to get into most museums, but the price of tickets is worth it for the Newseum (and sometimes you can get discounted tickets through deal websites). Also, tickets are good for 2 days entry (there really is enough inside to occupy 2 full days!). The permanent exhibits are all interesting, and I seem to notice/learn new things every time I visit. They also do a great job of rotating new exhibits in every few month so there is always new content. Additionally, the concept of the Newseum is based in news and the changing world which means even some of the permanent exhibits have space for things to be updated. You also get some of the best views in the city when you visit. The balcony upstairs gives you a great view for pictures right in front of the Capitol building. This is definitely a must-visit in DC!
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Carlos Hernandez
3 weeks ago
It is a wonderful place to visit. Only problem is trying to get a picture in certain areas cause the place is so packed.
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Rachel Antonio
7 months ago
Newseum is a museum dedicated to the news and they do a fantastic job documenting it. If you are even vaguely aware of and interested in media, this is the place to go. While not free, Newseum is worth the money and you can usually find a coupon in many of the free hotel magazines or advertisements for tourists. The exhibits are moving and really capture a time. See the Berlin Wall, get up close and personal with The Kennedys, and see the daily newspapers of every single state.
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Amber Haldis
7 months ago
Loved it. Went for Free Museum Day 2014 and was excited when I saw it opened at 9am! so I could get my day started early. Good thing too, but I didn't get out until almost 2! There are six very interactive floors, 4D movie and several movies theaters throughout. You can even stand in and perform a news cast on green screen with prompt reader and everything. Plus, any museum that idolizes Ron Burgundy is perfection. Neighborhood is great and it's easy to find. There's a cafe on the lowest floor, which looked to be pretty crowded around lunch time, but as we were walking on the third floor (I think) there's a patio off a small lunch room with small kiosk with sandwiches. I don't think anyone realized it was open to the public because the flyer said catered lunch, and maybe it was a weekend deal, but it was perfection to sit alone on the patio instead of in a crowded lunchroom. So keep an eye out for it. Nice balcony on the 6th floor too with a great view. And that's where they post front pages from newspapers all over the country and world DAILY! That's dedication to news. With regular tickets for adults around $25, getting the Free Museum Day voucher was a steal. Also all tickets are also good for the following day, so come back if it's too long to fit in one day, or pass them along to a friend. There is a coat check if needed and there is security. Food and souvenir prices as expected for a museum.
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Becky Wood
5 months ago
The Pulitzer Prize photo gallery could be a worthy museum in and of itself. Between that and the 9/11 exhibit (they even have the World Trade Center antenna on display,) you'd better wear waterproof mascara. You could easily spend a full day here, which is why the admission covers two days for one price. For kids (and fun-loving adults,) the best part is the "be a news anchor" interactive exhibit and finding your videos on YouTube afterwards. Definitely worth a trip!
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ryan radinsky
a month ago
don't waste your money. terribly laid out, too much of the space is occupied by gift shops. the "exhibits" are lacking, and given the role today's media plays as a mouthpiece for our government, rather than as an instrument to hold our leaders accountable, the first amendment exhibit is a laughable farce. the commentary by Brian Williams is the icing on this shit show cake.
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Nicholas Isola
3 months ago
had an incredible time. well worth the admission fee. the assortment of artifacts from TV, radio, print, and digital media was great.
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John Hutchinson
6 months ago
There are three fundamental problems with the exhibits in the Newseum: (1) They conflate the heroism of the people in the news with the heroism of the people covering the news. The entire section on the Civil Rights Movement is outstanding, but it says nothing about the history of journalism. Many other exhibits are just silly and unrelated to journalism in any way, e.g. "first dogs." The Edward R. Murrow exhibit is by far the best exhibit for relating a true history of journalism. (2) The documentary on "bias in journalism" is itself extraordinarily biased! It presents as an uncontested fact that there is a liberal bias in the media. Brian Williams is quoted as setting up a straw man argument with a fabricated story about a journalist referring differently in language about Gingrich and Kennedy. Bret Hume "proves" that the news media is liberal by contending that most reporters are liberal. But this says nothing about whether their reporting is biased. And this comes from one of the most biased "reporters" on television. News Corp's fingerprints are all over this travesty of an "exhibit." (3) Many exhibits fail to distinguish between real news coverage and the tendency of some reporters to simply accept unvarnished propaganda. The most obvious example of this is the prominent display of the toppling of Hussein's statue in Baghdad, a clearly stage media event and not an actual news event. Amazingly poor presentation for a "news museum."
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