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The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf® - Malaysia
163,057 followers -
Quality of Product, Service and Environment
Quality of Product, Service and Environment

163,057 followers
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Are you drinking coffee the right way? "There's a right way to drink coffee?", you ask. Well, the right way is when you're able to feel the effects of caffeine steadily and consistently all through the day, without suffering from a drastic energy crash. Here are a few ways to make sure you make the most out of your caffeine:

1) Drink it over a longer stretch of time: Instead of downing it all in one go, sip it slowly with longer intervals in between so that the caffeine is released more gradually into your system.

2) Drink water after coffee in the morning: Water + caffeine can boost your ability to concentrate, and also wake up your system by hydrating it after your body has gone without water for the whole night.

3) Eat slow-burning foods: Foods that metabolise more slowly like whole grains, vegetables and fruits support your caffeine's energy boosting qualities, so your energy levels stay higher for longer.
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Coffee brewing is a big wide world, and because of that we get various methods to choose from. While the flavour of your final cup ultimately relies more on the quality of your beans, different brewing methods are handy when you have limited equipment or simply want to have fun and experiment. Here are four of the most popular methods you can try out the next time you’re in a brewing mood:
1) Coffee Dripper: It’s called dripper because you simply pour hot water over ground coffee, and the coffee will drip into the pot at the bottom through a disposable or permanent filter.
2) Turkish: Requiring a considerable amount of precision and skill, the Turkish method puts finely ground coffee in a cezve pot, where it is heated with water, while slowly adding sugar. Once the water starts boiling, remove the pot from the heat, and repeat this process two to three times.
3) Syphon: Using vacuum to create a syphon, boiling hot water is pulled into the upper chamber, where the coffee grounds are steeped. Once the heat is removed, the syphon will be broken and the steeped coffee will return to the lower chamber of the syphon, ready for consuming.
4) Espresso: If you’re lucky enough to own an espresso machine, here’s how it works – coffee is brewed by pushing water that is nearly boiling through finely ground coffee beans at a high pressure. The end result is a thick coffee extract that can shoot your energy levels right off the charts!
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Nitro Cold Brew and Cold Brew have been giving old-fashioned iced coffee a run for its money since they were first incepted, thanks to their smooth flavours and creamy consistency. While they are both prepared with almost completely identical steps, nitrogen adds a lot of bells and whistles to the already incomparable Cold Brew. Here’s how Nitro Cold Brew and Cold Brew differ from each other:
1) Chemistry students: here’s a class refresher. Nitrogen gas doesn’t dissolve in water, and for Nitro Cold Brew that’s a good thing because it gives the brew feel thicker and more velvety when consumed. Additionally, the tap from which Nitro Cold Brew flows has a restrictor plate to squeeze the drink through tiny holes, which results in the frothy surface you see floating on top.
2) Adding nitrogen to Cold Brew is also said to slow down the degradation of coffee compounds. When coffee compounds break down, it makes coffee taste sourer and bitter, which is another reason why nitrogen makes your brew taste smoother.
3) Coffee with a longer lifespan? Say no more, with nitrogen! With the absence of oxygen, coffee oxidises more slowly than usual, which means it will remain fresher for a longer time.
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Ah, the festival of lights – one of the most glimmering times of the year in Malaysia. Given our cultural diversity, the celebration of Diwali in Malaysia is one that not only adapts its age-old traditions to modern norms, but also melds with other cultures’ for a truly unique experience.
One of the unmistakeable signs that Diwali is here is the sudden sprouting of ‘kolam’ everywhere. ‘Kolam’ is a vibrant art form that features intricate designs on the floor made out of turmeric powder, rice grains and rice flour in every colour imaginable. As we Malaysians love our shopping malls, lots of amazing ‘kolam’ designs can be found there.
Much like other festive occasions in our country that herald the beginning of a new year, Diwali begins with families spring cleaning their houses, and beyond that, decorating them with traditional oil lamps and neon electric bulbs. The traditional oil lamps fill the houses with a cosy ambience and warm glow.
Outside of their homes, devotees residing in Klang Valley will bring the celebration to Brickfields and Little India, where street bazaars selling snacks and traditional clothes will be decked out with the newest fare. Similar to Raya and Chinese New Year, Diwali is a time to step out with your new clothes and indulge in good food.
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Guess what: when it comes to coffee, you don't just need to use coffee beans! Technically, coffee can be made from either coffee beans or espresso beans. So, what's the actual difference between these two?

1) Coffee beans have a more general distinction, in that they can refer to any beans that have been roasted and made ready for brewing. Espresso beans, on the other hand, are dark roast, and this is the stage in which beans are the least acidic, with a fuller body.

2) Coffee beans are great if you like your java light, while espresso beans are perfect for a cuppa that's full of consistency, flavour and body.

3) Espresso beans usually produce a rich Crema that will make your espresso shot more satisfying than anything else.

4) Run-of-the-mill coffee beans can be brewed using a number of methods, whereas espresso beans are best brewed using a high pressure method.

Guess what: when it comes to coffee, you don't just need to use coffee beans! Technically, coffee can be made from either coffee beans or espresso beans. So, what's the actual difference between these two?

1) Coffee beans have a more general distinction, in that they can refer to any beans that have been roasted and made ready for brewing. Espresso beans, on the other hand, are dark roast, and this is the stage in which beans are the least acidic, with a fuller body.

2) Coffee beans are great if you like your java light, while espresso beans are perfect for a cuppa that's full of consistency, flavour and body.

3) Espresso beans usually produce a rich Crema that will make your espresso shot more satisfying than anything else.

4) Run-of-the-mill coffee beans can be brewed using a number of methods, whereas espresso beans are best brewed using a high pressure method.
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Whether you're new to brewing coffee by hand or a seasoned coffee connoiseur, it's undeniable that home brewed coffee is a complex, albeit rewarding experience. To help you along, here are three things you didn't know could affect your home brewed coffee, and how you can make the best of them:

1) Temperature of water: If the water is too hot, it will extract compounds from the coffee that are more bitter than pleasant. The recommended temperature for a brew is 200°F, or 93°C, or about 45 seconds into boiling before it comes to a complete boil.

2) Cleanliness of equipment: For best effects, your storage containers and grinders need to be cleaned once every few weeks to remove any oily residue. If you want to go the extra mile, submerge your coffee maker in a strong solution of vinegar or a specialty coffee-equipment cleaner to dissolve mineral deposits.

3) Freshness of coffee beans: How you store your beans is important. First things first, the container needs to be airtight, like a glass jar or ceramic crocks with rubber-gasket seals. They should also be kept at room temperature, and stored for no more than 5-7 days for optimal freshness.

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Countries like Brazil and Colombia are already famed for their prolific coffee production rates, and chances are we've all tasted coffee that is brewed from their beans at some point. Well, turns out there are still many other countries who produce coffee beans as well, and good ones too!

1) Haiti and the Dominican Republic: These two neighbouring nations have a lot going for them to grow good coffee, such as areas with high elevations, and suitable soil and climate conditions. In fact, a number of roasting companies have already moved in to take advantage, showing its increasing popularity.

2) Uganda: Being a large nation, Uganda still has many undiscovered areas that are ideal for planting coffee crops, such as elevated areas that go as high as 2,200 meters. However, it still has a ways to go in terms of manpower and technology. Keep close tabs on this one!

3) Yemen: Despite its proximity to the more renowned Ethiopia, Yemen is still new to the coffee game. Recently, its government has pushed for more farmers to grow coffee crops, which may change all that. Yemeni coffee may taste unusual to some due to its high concentration of herbal spices, but the conditions under which the coffee is grown can pave the way for extraordinary-tasting brews.
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With Mexican staples like Egg Rancheros and Jalapeño Cheese Bagels burning up our menu, we decided to deepen our knowledge of Mexican cuisine by seeking out the ingredients that they use the most often:

1) Chillies: Knowing how hot Mexican dishes are, chiles are the first thing you think of when it comes to ingredients. Jalapeño is one of the most popular, as are the flavourful ancho and the intense serrano. Best of all, they're versatile enough to be used across soups, salsas and sauces.

2) Beans: Black beans and pinto beans get the most love, as they're used to make dishes like refried beans, bean salads and soups.

3) Vegetable oil: Preferred over butter as the main source of oil, vegetable oil lends a unique flavour to dishes like masa, which is used to make tamale, and refried beans.
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Nitro Cold Brew has all of us coffee lovers under a spell thanks to its great flavour and unprecedented method of preparation. Have you ever wondered why it has to be served from a tap? We've got you the answers:

1) For freshness: When the cold brew coffee is stored inside a keg and refrigerated under pressure with nitrogen (that means there's no oxygen), it can stay fresh for up to weeks!

2) For speed: In a time and day where people want to receive something in the same moment they ask for it, nitro cold brew is tailor-made for them as having a keg and tap means that cold brew can be dispensed within seconds.

3) For a unique experience: The face of coffee is constantly changing, and everyone wants to try out the latest innovations and trends. Serving cold coffee from a tap is on-trend and gives the time-tested experience of coffee an edge.
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Nitro Cold Brew is one of the hottest drinks in the scene right now, which is ironic given the fact that it's a cold drink wink. Few would be able to guess that its origin story dates as far back as 2011, when a barista working in a coffee hub named Queens Kickshaw complained that the iced coffee was messy to serve. The owner, Ben Sandler had said jokingly: "Why don't we just push it through the draft system, that'd make it easier for you, huh?" It only took them another second, however, to realize that this was an idea that might actually work...

Once they began serving cold coffee from the tap, more places followed suit. In 2015, the cold brew got an upgrade with nitrogen infusion thanks to Cuvee Coffee in Texas and Stumptown in Oregon. They came out with the first nitro cold brew coffees in the form of cans, and it was an immediate hit, with some offices at the time even offering it as part of their coffee service. It was so sought after, that Stumptown's director of cold brew operations Diane Aylsworth was quoted as saying: "We are literally selling out of cans each time we make them."
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