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Mingalarbar & Warmest Greeting From Asia Time Travels & Tours. We are planning for travel program for Myanmar traveller !!!
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Ancient City of Bagan in Golden Land.
Old Bagan
One of the most remarkable sights in Southeast Asia, Bagan has inspired visitors to Myanmar for nearly 1000 years. The kingdom of Bagan took root in the 8th century but only rose to glory as capital of the First Kingdom of Myanmar in the early 11th century. Ancient chronicles say that there were once 4446 temples over its wide plains but today only 2230 remain, as recorded by UNESCO in 1988.
The thousands of temples that are spread across the plains of Bagan (sometimes spelt Pagan) are the most impressive testament to the religious devotion of Myanmar’s people – and rulers – over the centuries. They combine to form one of the richest archaeological sites in Asia and provide views quite unlike anywhere else on earth.

One of the beauties of spending time in what is now officially called the Bagan Archaeological Zone (which also comprises four main settlements) is that, once you have paid your K25,000 entry fee, you have the freedom to explore this vast and fascinating area at your own leisure (the ticket is valid for five days). Bagan is in general more touristy and possibly less of the ‘real Myanmar’ than other parts of the country, but despite obvious sales ploys such as the multitudes of children selling hand-drawn postcards, you will rarely suffer the hard sell – and the locals remain warm and friendly.

A brief history of Bagan
Bagan (formerly known as Pagan) was the capital of the Kingdom of Pagan from the 9th to the 13th centuries. This kingdom was the first to unify the area that is now Myanmar, establishing the Burmese culture and ethnicity, as well as Theravada Buddhism, in the region. Over this period of rule, as the city and kingdom grew in influence and stature, over 10,000 temples were built on the plains surrounding the capital next to the Irrawaddy River.

After Mongol invasions eventually led to the fall of the Kingdom of Pagan, the city was reduced to a small settlement, never to recover its former glories. The area did, however, remain a destination for Buddhist pilgrimage. A few hundred temples were added between the 13th and 20th centuries, but the huge amount of earthquake damage over the years means that only 2200 temples remain, in varying states of repair.

Indeed, over the last 500 years many of the existing temples have been renovated – a process that, continuing to this day, has yielded mixed results. It is said to be due to the government’s insensitive ‘updates’ in the 1990s (including a golf course and modern watch tower) that Bagan has not attained UNESCO World Heritage site status, although it is once again being considered. But the area is large enough, and there remains so much of what is original still to see, that none of this stops the temples of Bagan being a unique wonder to behold.

Exploring the temples
Every one of the 2200 plus temples, stupas and pagodas has its own unique story to tell, and many can be freely explored – inside and out. Some are locked, but even if you are travelling around without a guide, you can sometimes find a friendly local nearby to open them for you; they may try to sell you a painting or two, or want a little ‘tea money‘ in return, but the expense will be minimal.
The most spectacular time to see the temples is when the sun dramatically rises and falls over the plain at dawn or dusk.

There are several ways to explore the plain:
Hire a bicycle. This is the cheapest way to get around, and also allows you the most freedom to do as you choose; the plain is too large to explore by foot, but getting around by bike allows you to get to most of the temples. Almost all hotels and guesthouses have them for hire, as do various restaurants and shops on the popular ‘Restaurant Row’ in Nyaung U. Prices are usually around K2000 per day.
You can hire an electric bike for around K8000 per day – though on the flat plains of Bagan, the advantages over a bicycle are minimal. Tourists are not allowed to use motorbikes in Bagan.
You can pick up a free tourist map showing you the main points of interest; although you are unlikely to get seriously lost, it is worth planning your trip in advance to make the most of your time. Bear in mind that it can get hot and dusty when cycling, particularly in the summer months, so you should take water with you. There are plenty of restaurants around the place to pick up refreshments.

Go on a horse and cart guided tour. This is many people’s favourite, and certainly the most romantic way to see the temples. Most drivers speak at least some English (it is worth checking before you agree the price), and will of course know good routes around the temples and some hidden gems. However, horses have to follow more well-trodden tracks than bicycles, so there are areas they cannot reach. Prices range from K15,000 to K25,000 for a day, depending on the season and where you hire the horse and cart from (New Bagan tends to be more expensive). Carts can be shared between two or, at most, three people.

Take an air conditioned taxi, if you want to avoid the heat and dust completely. This is naturally the most comfortable way to get around, and most drivers speak English. Cars will usually cost between $20 and $50 per day, depending on the season and how far you travel.

The most exotic and spectacular way to see the temples is to head to the sky for a hot air balloon trip. These cost around $275 per person, and offer a unique view of the plain and temples. Balloon tours can be booked here; you should always book well in advance, particularly at popular times of year such as Christmas and New year.

Taking two or more days and using different forms of transport can be the best way to explore the plain. If you see the highlights by horse and cart or hot air balloon, then following it up with a bike ride can be the ideal way to find the specific temples that have taken your fancy.

Beyond the transport options listed above, you can also get around by trishaw and small pick-ups. These are cheap (usually no more than K500), but trishaws can only be used for short distances in towns, and pick-ups only operate along the main road from Nyaung U to Old Bagan and on to New Bagan.

Individual temples
For most people the best approach to seeing temples is to go with a guide, get some advice from a friendly local, or just start exploring. But there are some sites that should not be missed. These include:

The huge and beautifully preserved Ananda Pagoda. In late December to early January, there is a huge festival centred on the Ananda Pagoda that celebrates the traditional lives of farmers in the area; locals come from the surrounding villages in their decorated bullock carts and camp on the plain for the duration. Entertainment is provided by theatrical troupes and on the final daybreak there is a formal alms giving to the monks who live in the nearby monastery.

The Gawdaw Palin temple, which sits on the banks of the Irrawaddy.
The teak-built Myoe Daung Monastery and Tharabar Gate in Old Bagan.
The imposing, red brick Dhammayangyi temple, which covers the largest area of all the temples in Bagan.
The That Byin Nyu temple, the tallest monument on the plain.
The spectacular sunrise and sunset views from the Shwesandaw Pagoda or Pyathada (Pyathatgyi) Pagoda. Bear in mind that during the peak season from November to February, the viewpoints from these temples get crowded at sunset and there can be some uncomfortable pushing and shoving. The alternatives are to make an effort to get up early for sunrise or find other, smaller temples to take in the views from.

The towns of Bagan
The Bagan Archaeological Zone, as the larger area is formally known, comprises the temples of Bagan and four main settlements – Nyaung U, Old Bagan, Myinkaba and New Bagan; you can find information about them below. Visitors are required to buy a K 25,000 entry pass for the zone, and have to show this when checking in to accommodation.

Nyaung U
Most people’s arrival point in the region is Nyaung U (also spelt Nyaung Oo); the bus terminal, train station and airport can be found south east of town, and boats from Mandalay arrive right by the town centre at Nyaung U jetty (for information on getting to Bagan, go here). Of the settlements in Bagan, Nyaung U has the most charm and the best range of things to do; the centre of the village is atmospheric, with some colonial architecture and a market which is a hive of activity.

Highlights of Nyaung U
Shwezigon Pagoda
At the west end of Nyaung-U, it was started in AD 1059 by King Anawrahta completed in 1090 by King Kyansitthar. Famous as big and most beautiful zedi in Bagan Pagodas.

Kyansitha Umin
About 270yd southwest of Shwezigon. Although of ficially credited to Kyansittha, it is thought to have built during the region of Anawrahta. The long, dimly lit corriddors of this cave temple are decorated with frescoes depicting the social lives of Bagan.

Thatkyamuni Pagoda
Half a mile north of Nyaung-U Jetty, the 13th century Pagoda, with a few murals inside the steps and walls.

Kondawgyi Pahto
On the hill near by Thatkyamuni, the same ear Pagoda, with better preserved murals.

Kyaukgu Umin
On the river bank of Ayeyarwaddy, about another half a mile of Kandawgyi. Built by Narapatisithu in 12th century. The inside tunnel is long about 55 yd and some locals say the tunnel was intended to go.

Sapada Pagoda
East of Shwezigon Pagoda and corner of Anawrahta road and Nyaung-U kyaukpadaung road.

Old Bagan
If you want to be in the thick of the temples, Old Bagan is the place to be, sitting as it does within what remains of the city walls of the ancient capital (some gates still remain). Old Bagan has some of the most beautifully appointed – and expensive – hotels in Bagan, several of which have great views of the temples or the Irrawaddy River. Between the stunning white-walled Ananda Pagoda and Tharabar Gate, you can find a selection of pleasant outdoor restaurants.

The Ananda Pagoda Festival takes place in late December or January (depended on the Lunar calendar) and features traditional performances and a market that boasts local produce of woven baskets and lacquerware. Farmers also come from the surrounding countryside with carts full of offerings for monks. To find out more about festivals across the country, go to festivals in Myanmar.

Highlights of Old Bagan
Gawdawpalin Or Kandawplin Pagoda
On the road between Naung – U and New Bagan,near the Archacological museum, it is two story temple and one of the largest and most imposing Bagan temples. Built during the reign of Narapatisithu and finished under that of Nantaungmya.

Mimalaung Kyaung
Built in AD 1174 by Narapatisithu. It is about 220 yd south of gawdawpalin, on the other side of the road.

Thatbyinnyu Pagoda
Built in AD 1144 by Alaungsithu, Bagan highest temple (about 160yd east of Nathlaung Kyaung and 220yd south east of Shwegugyi) is built of 4 storeyed of 207 ft hight.

Shwegugyi Pagoda
Built by King Alaungsithu in AD 1131, closed to the palace of King Kyansittha, it is smaller but elegant pahto, about 220 yd northwest of Thatbyinnyu.

Pahtothamya
About 160yd west of Thatbyinnyu, it was probalaly built during the reign of Kyansittha around the turn of the 12th century , although it is some believed to be one of five temple built by the King Taungthugyi aka sawrahan reigned from AD 931 by King taungthugyi. It is actually the only Hindu(Vishnu) temple remaining in Bagan.

Nathlaung Kyaung
Between Pahtothamya and Thatbinnyu, it is believed to be built in early 11th century, although some say it was built in AD 931 by king Taungthugyi. It is actually the only Hindu(Vishnu) Temple remaining in Bagan.

Tharabar Gate
The best preserved remains of the 9th century wall and the only gate still standing, it is built by Pyinbya Min, the first king of Bagan, the traces of old stucco can still be seen on the gateway. Mg Thint Te (Lord handsome) and his sister Shwemyethnadaw (lady Golden face) are on either side of the Gateway.

Old palace site of King Kyansittha
Just in from the Tharavar Gate, north of Shwegugyi.

Pitakat Taik
Near by Tharabar Gate and just northeast of Shwegugyi.

Mahabodhi Pagoda
About 380yd northwest of the Tharabar Gate, unlike any other Bagan temple, it is modelled from the famous Mahabodhi temple in Bodhgaya, India, with commemorates the spot where the Buddha attained enlightenment, Built during the region of Nantaungmya in AD 1215.

Bupaya
On the bank of the Ayeyarwaddy River, about 220 yd northwest of the Mahabodhi Pagoda. It ia saud to date back further than any Bagan temple and some claims it was built originally by Kinng Pyusawhti in 3rd Century. What’s seen now is a complete reconstruction after the 1975 earth quake demolished the original.

Ananda Pagoda
Ananda is one of the finest, largest best-preserved and most revered of all Bagan temples. About 490yd north east of Thatbyinnyu and 550yd north of Shwesandaw. It is built between AD 1090 and 1105 by King Kyansittha.

Ananda Oke Kyaung (Ananda Brick Monastery)
Just west of Ananda’s northern entry, originally built in AD 1137 and reconstructed in 17th century, it features some 18th century murals with colorful, showing details of everyday life from the Bagan period.

Htilominlo Pagoda
Northeast of Ananda and just south of Bagan-Nyaung U road, this big square 150 ft-high temple, built in AD 1218 by King Nantaungmya, makes the spot where he was chosen , amongest five brothers, to be the crown prince.

Upali Thein
Just north of the Bagan-Naung U Rd, across the road from Htilominlo, this mid-113th century ordination hall has some brightly painted frescoes depicting big scenes from the late 17th or early 18th century on the wall and ceilings.

Gubyauknge
Off Anawrahta Road, northeast of Htilominlo, this early Bagan-period temple has some execellent stucco carving on the outside walls(particularly on the north side) and some orginal paintings visible inside.

Wetkyi-In-Gubyaukgyi
Aboout 100 yd north-east of Gubyauknge, this 13th century temple resembled thye mahabodhi temple at Budhagaya, like the Mahabodhi Pagoda. It is interesting for the fine wall paintings of scense from the Jakata.

Shwesandaw Pagoda
Bagan’s most famous sunset pagoda the Shwesandaw has five terraces with steps leading to the stupa top, With good overlooking views. At the southeast of Nathlaung Kyaung, built in AD 1057 by King Anawrahta, the stupa supposedly enstrines a Buddha hair relic, brought from Thaton.

Dhammayangyi Pagoda
Visible from all parts of Bagan, this 12th century temple is marked as the biggest in mass temple in Bagan. About 550 yd east of Shwesandaw, Although many believed it was built by King Narathu during his reign, others argue the temple dates from the earlier of Alaungsithu.

Alodaw Pyae Pagoda
On the Bagan – Nyaung U road, and near by htilominlo, it is believed to be built by King Kyansittha in 12th century. It is one storeyed temple and has only one entrance, with incriptions in Mon inside.

Mingalar Zedi
Closed the Ayeyarwaddy River bank and Thiripyitsaya Hotel, it is started in AD 1268 and finished in AD 1274 by king Narathihapatae(or)Tayokpyaemin. It is famous as great sunset spot.

Myinkaba
Myinkaba, a village just to the south of Old Bagan, is famous for its traditional Mon-style lacquerware, the manufacturing of which dates back to the time of King Manuha, the last king of Thaton, who brought his artisans with him into exile here in the 11th century. Myinkaba is a centre for bamboo weaving (for use in construction) and has several family-run lacquerware workshops, including the Golden Cuckoo; if you want to take a memento home with you, it offers the best range of shopping in Bagan.

Highlights of Myinkaba
Myingaba-Gubyaukgyi
Situated just to the left of the road as entering Myingaba, Gubyaukgyi was built in AD 1113 by Kyinsittha’s son Razakumar, dedicated for his father. It is famous for its preserved, richly coloured paintings inside.

Myazedi Pagoda & Inscription
West to Gubyaukgyi, it is famous for the “Myazedi Inscription”. Written in four languages-Pyu-Mon, Burmese,Pali about the consecrating of Razakumar for Gubyaukgyi. Its linguistic and historical significance is great.

Manuha Pagoda
In Myinkaba village, almost half of a mile south of Gubyaukgyi, it was built Mon King Manuha in AD 1059, When he was held captive here by king Anawrahta.

Manuha Pagoda
In Myinkaba village,almost half of mile south of Gubyaukgyi, it was built by Mon King Manahu in AD 1059, when he was held captive here by king Anawrahta.

Nan Pagoda
Just south of the Manuha Pagoda, this temple is said to have been used as Manuha’s prison or as his resident. But some say that it was built by Nagathaman, grandson of Manuha and Shwe En The, daughter of king Narapatisithu in the region of Narapatisithu(AD 1174-1211) at the place Manuha lived.

Apeyadana Pagoda
About 440 yd south of the Manuha, this 11th century Temple was supposedly built by Apeyadana, one of the queen of King Kyansitta.

Nagayon Pagoda
Slightly south of Apeyadana and across the road, this elegant and wall preserved temple was an early consecrating of King Kyansittha, built in AD 1192.

Somingyi Kyaung
About 220 yd southeast of Nagayon, thought to have been built in AQD 1204, this typical late-Bagan brick monastery is unique in that it has monastic cells clustered around a courtyard.

New Bagan
The furthest south of Bagan’s settlements (but still closer to the most popular temples than Nyaung U), New Bagan has a good range of budget and mid-price accommodation. It was built in 1990, when the government relocated the villagers from Old Bagan, and so lacks the colonial charm of Nyaung U.

New Bagan does, however, retain a pleasant atmosphere, it offers opportunities for local handicraft shopping and has some lovely restaurants, some of which are perched high on the banks of the Irrawaddy, offering views across the river.

Festivals and traditional Myanmar sports tournaments are sometimes held in the area around the pagoda in the centre of New Bagan.

Highlights of New Bagan
Seinnyet Ama & Nyima Pagoda
Just east of Chauk-Bagan Rd and northern part of New Bagan, This Seinnyet Ama temple and Seinnyet Nyima stupa stand side by side are traditionally ascribed to Queen Seinnyet In the 11th century although the architecture points to a period of 13th century.

Lawkananda Pagoda
On the east bank of Ayeyarwaddy River, about 270 yd southeast of the New Bagan crossroads, this pagoda was built by King Anawrahta in AD 1059, at the height of Bagan’s power and suppos edly shrined one of Buddha tooth replica brought from Srilanka.

Ashe(East) Anouk(West) Petleik Pagoda
Just inland to the northeast from Lawkananda Pagoda, this twin 11th century Pagoda was thought to be Built in the region of King Anawrahta.

Sittana Pagoda or Setana Pagoda
About half a mile south of Twin Petleik of the road to Chauk, This large, 13th century bell-shaped stupa, built by King Htilominlo (aka) Nantaungmya is New Bagan’s most impressive pagoda.

Around Minnanthu Village & Pwasaw Village
Dhamayazika Pagoda
About 2 miles east of the New Bagan cross roads and standing north of the main road to airport and railway station, it was built by king Narapatisithu in AD 1196.

Leimyethna Pagoda
Almost 2 miles north east of Dhamayazika on the north side of the road near Minnanthu village this temple was built in AD 1222 by the couple of Anandathuya, minister of King Htilominlo.

Tayok Pye Min Pagoda
About 200 yd north of Leimyetha, it has lovely views from its upper level.

Payathonzu Pagoda
Across the main road from tayokpyemin, this complex of there interconnected shrines was supconstruction was completed-possibly due to the invasion of Kublai Khan.

Thambula Pagoda
Just north of Payathonzu , it was built in AD 1255 by Thambula, the queen of King Uzana.

Nandamannya Pagoda
About 220 yd north of Thanbula, this single-chambered temple with fine freescoes was built in the reign of King Narapatisithu early 13th century.

Hmya tha Umin & Tha-mee-whet Umin
Just southeast of Nyaung U and Northeast of Hnyetpyittaung, it is said to be built in 13th century.

Archaeological Museum
The Archaeological museum was inaugurated in 1904 by Mr.Tawseinkho, the inscription officer located near the Gawdawpalin Temple in Old Bagan, the two storied new building of Bagan Archaeological Museum was reconstructed in 1995 and opened in 17 Apirl 1998. Open from 9:30 AM to 3:00 PM hours daily except Mondays and Public Holiday.

Around Of Bagan
Tuyin Taung Pagoda
One the hilltop of Tuyin Taung, about 7 miles southeast of shwezigon, it is believed built by Anawyahta and shrined one of Buddha tooth replica.

Tantkyi Taung Pagoda
On the hill top of Tantkyi Taung, the other side of Ayeyawaddy, southwest of Bagan it is also believed built by Anawyahta and shined one of Buddha tooth replica.
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Yangon Architecture
===============
Welcome to Yangon Architecture, a Facebook and Tumblr site run by Manuel Oka, Ben Bansal and Elliott Fox. We are currently in the process of writing an architectural guide to Yangon (forthcoming DOM Publishers 2015) and are posting here photos of lesser-known buildings from the former Burmese capital. These are the buildings for which we still require some facts in order to make our guide a definitive source of information on Yangon’s rich architectural heritage. While we are continuously researching on-the-ground in the city and are linked up with some of the world’s foremost experts on architecture in Myanmar, we thought we can invite people around the world to help us “crowdsource” this process, too. All photos have a small description and invite anyone of you to contribute historical facts, anecdotes or any other comment. Thank you very much for your help, and we hope you enjoy this virtual tour of one of the world’s most magnificent cities.
ARCHIVE

The Surti Sunni Jamah Mosque on Shwebontha Street is the direct heir to Rangoon’s oldest mosque, which was built here in 1826, but was destroyed during the Second Anglo-Burmese War in 1852. The Gujarati community rebuilt a mosque here later, quite possibly in 1871. “Surti” points us to Surat, the second biggest city in the West Indian state, where most of the Gujarati traders originated from. Shwebontha Street used to be known as Mogul (Mughal) Street and is at the center of Indian activity in Yangon. Nearby places of interest, and also separate entries in our forthcoming book, include the Jain Temple, Nausaripuri Mosque and the Sri Kalima Hindu Temple. Along with the many shops and restaurants, this part of Yangon is a vivid kaleidoscope of the varied influences the Indian subcontinent had and continues to have on life in Myanmar.
surti sunni jamah mosque rangoon yangon burma myanmar colonial period

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Ancient City of Bagan in Golden Land.
Old Bagan
One of the most remarkable sights in Southeast Asia, Bagan has inspired visitors to Myanmar for nearly 1000 years. The kingdom of Bagan took root in the 8th century but only rose to glory as capital of the First Kingdom of Myanmar in the early 11th century. Ancient chronicles say that there were once 4446 temples over its wide plains but today only 2230 remain, as recorded by UNESCO in 1988.
The thousands of temples that are spread across the plains of Bagan (sometimes spelt Pagan) are the most impressive testament to the religious devotion of Myanmar’s people – and rulers – over the centuries. They combine to form one of the richest archaeological sites in Asia and provide views quite unlike anywhere else on earth.

One of the beauties of spending time in what is now officially called the Bagan Archaeological Zone (which also comprises four main settlements) is that, once you have paid your K25,000 entry fee, you have the freedom to explore this vast and fascinating area at your own leisure (the ticket is valid for five days). Bagan is in general more touristy and possibly less of the ‘real Myanmar’ than other parts of the country, but despite obvious sales ploys such as the multitudes of children selling hand-drawn postcards, you will rarely suffer the hard sell – and the locals remain warm and friendly.

A brief history of Bagan
Bagan (formerly known as Pagan) was the capital of the Kingdom of Pagan from the 9th to the 13th centuries. This kingdom was the first to unify the area that is now Myanmar, establishing the Burmese culture and ethnicity, as well as Theravada Buddhism, in the region. Over this period of rule, as the city and kingdom grew in influence and stature, over 10,000 temples were built on the plains surrounding the capital next to the Irrawaddy River.

After Mongol invasions eventually led to the fall of the Kingdom of Pagan, the city was reduced to a small settlement, never to recover its former glories. The area did, however, remain a destination for Buddhist pilgrimage. A few hundred temples were added between the 13th and 20th centuries, but the huge amount of earthquake damage over the years means that only 2200 temples remain, in varying states of repair.

Indeed, over the last 500 years many of the existing temples have been renovated – a process that, continuing to this day, has yielded mixed results. It is said to be due to the government’s insensitive ‘updates’ in the 1990s (including a golf course and modern watch tower) that Bagan has not attained UNESCO World Heritage site status, although it is once again being considered. But the area is large enough, and there remains so much of what is original still to see, that none of this stops the temples of Bagan being a unique wonder to behold.

Exploring the temples
Every one of the 2200 plus temples, stupas and pagodas has its own unique story to tell, and many can be freely explored – inside and out. Some are locked, but even if you are travelling around without a guide, you can sometimes find a friendly local nearby to open them for you; they may try to sell you a painting or two, or want a little ‘tea money‘ in return, but the expense will be minimal.
The most spectacular time to see the temples is when the sun dramatically rises and falls over the plain at dawn or dusk.

There are several ways to explore the plain:
Hire a bicycle. This is the cheapest way to get around, and also allows you the most freedom to do as you choose; the plain is too large to explore by foot, but getting around by bike allows you to get to most of the temples. Almost all hotels and guesthouses have them for hire, as do various restaurants and shops on the popular ‘Restaurant Row’ in Nyaung U. Prices are usually around K2000 per day.
You can hire an electric bike for around K8000 per day – though on the flat plains of Bagan, the advantages over a bicycle are minimal. Tourists are not allowed to use motorbikes in Bagan.
You can pick up a free tourist map showing you the main points of interest; although you are unlikely to get seriously lost, it is worth planning your trip in advance to make the most of your time. Bear in mind that it can get hot and dusty when cycling, particularly in the summer months, so you should take water with you. There are plenty of restaurants around the place to pick up refreshments.

Go on a horse and cart guided tour. This is many people’s favourite, and certainly the most romantic way to see the temples. Most drivers speak at least some English (it is worth checking before you agree the price), and will of course know good routes around the temples and some hidden gems. However, horses have to follow more well-trodden tracks than bicycles, so there are areas they cannot reach. Prices range from K15,000 to K25,000 for a day, depending on the season and where you hire the horse and cart from (New Bagan tends to be more expensive). Carts can be shared between two or, at most, three people.

Take an air conditioned taxi, if you want to avoid the heat and dust completely. This is naturally the most comfortable way to get around, and most drivers speak English. Cars will usually cost between $20 and $50 per day, depending on the season and how far you travel.

The most exotic and spectacular way to see the temples is to head to the sky for a hot air balloon trip. These cost around $275 per person, and offer a unique view of the plain and temples. Balloon tours can be booked here; you should always book well in advance, particularly at popular times of year such as Christmas and New year.

Taking two or more days and using different forms of transport can be the best way to explore the plain. If you see the highlights by horse and cart or hot air balloon, then following it up with a bike ride can be the ideal way to find the specific temples that have taken your fancy.

Beyond the transport options listed above, you can also get around by trishaw and small pick-ups. These are cheap (usually no more than K500), but trishaws can only be used for short distances in towns, and pick-ups only operate along the main road from Nyaung U to Old Bagan and on to New Bagan.

Individual temples
For most people the best approach to seeing temples is to go with a guide, get some advice from a friendly local, or just start exploring. But there are some sites that should not be missed. These include:

The huge and beautifully preserved Ananda Pagoda. In late December to early January, there is a huge festival centred on the Ananda Pagoda that celebrates the traditional lives of farmers in the area; locals come from the surrounding villages in their decorated bullock carts and camp on the plain for the duration. Entertainment is provided by theatrical troupes and on the final daybreak there is a formal alms giving to the monks who live in the nearby monastery.

The Gawdaw Palin temple, which sits on the banks of the Irrawaddy.
The teak-built Myoe Daung Monastery and Tharabar Gate in Old Bagan.
The imposing, red brick Dhammayangyi temple, which covers the largest area of all the temples in Bagan.
The That Byin Nyu temple, the tallest monument on the plain.
The spectacular sunrise and sunset views from the Shwesandaw Pagoda or Pyathada (Pyathatgyi) Pagoda. Bear in mind that during the peak season from November to February, the viewpoints from these temples get crowded at sunset and there can be some uncomfortable pushing and shoving. The alternatives are to make an effort to get up early for sunrise or find other, smaller temples to take in the views from.

The towns of Bagan
The Bagan Archaeological Zone, as the larger area is formally known, comprises the temples of Bagan and four main settlements – Nyaung U, Old Bagan, Myinkaba and New Bagan; you can find information about them below. Visitors are required to buy a K 25,000 entry pass for the zone, and have to show this when checking in to accommodation.

Nyaung U
Most people’s arrival point in the region is Nyaung U (also spelt Nyaung Oo); the bus terminal, train station and airport can be found south east of town, and boats from Mandalay arrive right by the town centre at Nyaung U jetty (for information on getting to Bagan, go here). Of the settlements in Bagan, Nyaung U has the most charm and the best range of things to do; the centre of the village is atmospheric, with some colonial architecture and a market which is a hive of activity.

Highlights of Nyaung U
Shwezigon Pagoda
At the west end of Nyaung-U, it was started in AD 1059 by King Anawrahta completed in 1090 by King Kyansitthar. Famous as big and most beautiful zedi in Bagan Pagodas.

Kyansitha Umin
About 270yd southwest of Shwezigon. Although of ficially credited to Kyansittha, it is thought to have built during the region of Anawrahta. The long, dimly lit corriddors of this cave temple are decorated with frescoes depicting the social lives of Bagan.

Thatkyamuni Pagoda
Half a mile north of Nyaung-U Jetty, the 13th century Pagoda, with a few murals inside the steps and walls.

Kondawgyi Pahto
On the hill near by Thatkyamuni, the same ear Pagoda, with better preserved murals.

Kyaukgu Umin
On the river bank of Ayeyarwaddy, about another half a mile of Kandawgyi. Built by Narapatisithu in 12th century. The inside tunnel is long about 55 yd and some locals say the tunnel was intended to go.

Sapada Pagoda
East of Shwezigon Pagoda and corner of Anawrahta road and Nyaung-U kyaukpadaung road.

Old Bagan
If you want to be in the thick of the temples, Old Bagan is the place to be, sitting as it does within what remains of the city walls of the ancient capital (some gates still remain). Old Bagan has some of the most beautifully appointed – and expensive – hotels in Bagan, several of which have great views of the temples or the Irrawaddy River. Between the stunning white-walled Ananda Pagoda and Tharabar Gate, you can find a selection of pleasant outdoor restaurants.

The Ananda Pagoda Festival takes place in late December or January (depended on the Lunar calendar) and features traditional performances and a market that boasts local produce of woven baskets and lacquerware. Farmers also come from the surrounding countryside with carts full of offerings for monks. To find out more about festivals across the country, go to festivals in Myanmar.

Highlights of Old Bagan
Gawdawpalin Or Kandawplin Pagoda
On the road between Naung – U and New Bagan,near the Archacological museum, it is two story temple and one of the largest and most imposing Bagan temples. Built during the reign of Narapatisithu and finished under that of Nantaungmya.

Mimalaung Kyaung
Built in AD 1174 by Narapatisithu. It is about 220 yd south of gawdawpalin, on the other side of the road.

Thatbyinnyu Pagoda
Built in AD 1144 by Alaungsithu, Bagan highest temple (about 160yd east of Nathlaung Kyaung and 220yd south east of Shwegugyi) is built of 4 storeyed of 207 ft hight.

Shwegugyi Pagoda
Built by King Alaungsithu in AD 1131, closed to the palace of King Kyansittha, it is smaller but elegant pahto, about 220 yd northwest of Thatbyinnyu.

Pahtothamya
About 160yd west of Thatbyinnyu, it was probalaly built during the reign of Kyansittha around the turn of the 12th century , although it is some believed to be one of five temple built by the King Taungthugyi aka sawrahan reigned from AD 931 by King taungthugyi. It is actually the only Hindu(Vishnu) temple remaining in Bagan.

Nathlaung Kyaung
Between Pahtothamya and Thatbinnyu, it is believed to be built in early 11th century, although some say it was built in AD 931 by king Taungthugyi. It is actually the only Hindu(Vishnu) Temple remaining in Bagan.

Tharabar Gate
The best preserved remains of the 9th century wall and the only gate still standing, it is built by Pyinbya Min, the first king of Bagan, the traces of old stucco can still be seen on the gateway. Mg Thint Te (Lord handsome) and his sister Shwemyethnadaw (lady Golden face) are on either side of the Gateway.

Old palace site of King Kyansittha
Just in from the Tharavar Gate, north of Shwegugyi.

Pitakat Taik
Near by Tharabar Gate and just northeast of Shwegugyi.

Mahabodhi Pagoda
About 380yd northwest of the Tharabar Gate, unlike any other Bagan temple, it is modelled from the famous Mahabodhi temple in Bodhgaya, India, with commemorates the spot where the Buddha attained enlightenment, Built during the region of Nantaungmya in AD 1215.

Bupaya
On the bank of the Ayeyarwaddy River, about 220 yd northwest of the Mahabodhi Pagoda. It ia saud to date back further than any Bagan temple and some claims it was built originally by Kinng Pyusawhti in 3rd Century. What’s seen now is a complete reconstruction after the 1975 earth quake demolished the original.

Ananda Pagoda
Ananda is one of the finest, largest best-preserved and most revered of all Bagan temples. About 490yd north east of Thatbyinnyu and 550yd north of Shwesandaw. It is built between AD 1090 and 1105 by King Kyansittha.

Ananda Oke Kyaung (Ananda Brick Monastery)
Just west of Ananda’s northern entry, originally built in AD 1137 and reconstructed in 17th century, it features some 18th century murals with colorful, showing details of everyday life from the Bagan period.

Htilominlo Pagoda
Northeast of Ananda and just south of Bagan-Nyaung U road, this big square 150 ft-high temple, built in AD 1218 by King Nantaungmya, makes the spot where he was chosen , amongest five brothers, to be the crown prince.

Upali Thein
Just north of the Bagan-Naung U Rd, across the road from Htilominlo, this mid-113th century ordination hall has some brightly painted frescoes depicting big scenes from the late 17th or early 18th century on the wall and ceilings.

Gubyauknge
Off Anawrahta Road, northeast of Htilominlo, this early Bagan-period temple has some execellent stucco carving on the outside walls(particularly on the north side) and some orginal paintings visible inside.

Wetkyi-In-Gubyaukgyi
Aboout 100 yd north-east of Gubyauknge, this 13th century temple resembled thye mahabodhi temple at Budhagaya, like the Mahabodhi Pagoda. It is interesting for the fine wall paintings of scense from the Jakata.

Shwesandaw Pagoda
Bagan’s most famous sunset pagoda the Shwesandaw has five terraces with steps leading to the stupa top, With good overlooking views. At the southeast of Nathlaung Kyaung, built in AD 1057 by King Anawrahta, the stupa supposedly enstrines a Buddha hair relic, brought from Thaton.

Dhammayangyi Pagoda
Visible from all parts of Bagan, this 12th century temple is marked as the biggest in mass temple in Bagan. About 550 yd east of Shwesandaw, Although many believed it was built by King Narathu during his reign, others argue the temple dates from the earlier of Alaungsithu.

Alodaw Pyae Pagoda
On the Bagan – Nyaung U road, and near by htilominlo, it is believed to be built by King Kyansittha in 12th century. It is one storeyed temple and has only one entrance, with incriptions in Mon inside.

Mingalar Zedi
Closed the Ayeyarwaddy River bank and Thiripyitsaya Hotel, it is started in AD 1268 and finished in AD 1274 by king Narathihapatae(or)Tayokpyaemin. It is famous as great sunset spot.

Myinkaba
Myinkaba, a village just to the south of Old Bagan, is famous for its traditional Mon-style lacquerware, the manufacturing of which dates back to the time of King Manuha, the last king of Thaton, who brought his artisans with him into exile here in the 11th century. Myinkaba is a centre for bamboo weaving (for use in construction) and has several family-run lacquerware workshops, including the Golden Cuckoo; if you want to take a memento home with you, it offers the best range of shopping in Bagan.

Highlights of Myinkaba
Myingaba-Gubyaukgyi
Situated just to the left of the road as entering Myingaba, Gubyaukgyi was built in AD 1113 by Kyinsittha’s son Razakumar, dedicated for his father. It is famous for its preserved, richly coloured paintings inside.

Myazedi Pagoda & Inscription
West to Gubyaukgyi, it is famous for the “Myazedi Inscription”. Written in four languages-Pyu-Mon, Burmese,Pali about the consecrating of Razakumar for Gubyaukgyi. Its linguistic and historical significance is great.

Manuha Pagoda
In Myinkaba village, almost half of a mile south of Gubyaukgyi, it was built Mon King Manuha in AD 1059, When he was held captive here by king Anawrahta.

Manuha Pagoda
In Myinkaba village,almost half of mile south of Gubyaukgyi, it was built by Mon King Manahu in AD 1059, when he was held captive here by king Anawrahta.

Nan Pagoda
Just south of the Manuha Pagoda, this temple is said to have been used as Manuha’s prison or as his resident. But some say that it was built by Nagathaman, grandson of Manuha and Shwe En The, daughter of king Narapatisithu in the region of Narapatisithu(AD 1174-1211) at the place Manuha lived.

Apeyadana Pagoda
About 440 yd south of the Manuha, this 11th century Temple was supposedly built by Apeyadana, one of the queen of King Kyansitta.

Nagayon Pagoda
Slightly south of Apeyadana and across the road, this elegant and wall preserved temple was an early consecrating of King Kyansittha, built in AD 1192.

Somingyi Kyaung
About 220 yd southeast of Nagayon, thought to have been built in AQD 1204, this typical late-Bagan brick monastery is unique in that it has monastic cells clustered around a courtyard.

New Bagan
The furthest south of Bagan’s settlements (but still closer to the most popular temples than Nyaung U), New Bagan has a good range of budget and mid-price accommodation. It was built in 1990, when the government relocated the villagers from Old Bagan, and so lacks the colonial charm of Nyaung U.

New Bagan does, however, retain a pleasant atmosphere, it offers opportunities for local handicraft shopping and has some lovely restaurants, some of which are perched high on the banks of the Irrawaddy, offering views across the river.

Festivals and traditional Myanmar sports tournaments are sometimes held in the area around the pagoda in the centre of New Bagan.

Highlights of New Bagan
Seinnyet Ama & Nyima Pagoda
Just east of Chauk-Bagan Rd and northern part of New Bagan, This Seinnyet Ama temple and Seinnyet Nyima stupa stand side by side are traditionally ascribed to Queen Seinnyet In the 11th century although the architecture points to a period of 13th century.

Lawkananda Pagoda
On the east bank of Ayeyarwaddy River, about 270 yd southeast of the New Bagan crossroads, this pagoda was built by King Anawrahta in AD 1059, at the height of Bagan’s power and suppos edly shrined one of Buddha tooth replica brought from Srilanka.

Ashe(East) Anouk(West) Petleik Pagoda
Just inland to the northeast from Lawkananda Pagoda, this twin 11th century Pagoda was thought to be Built in the region of King Anawrahta.

Sittana Pagoda or Setana Pagoda
About half a mile south of Twin Petleik of the road to Chauk, This large, 13th century bell-shaped stupa, built by King Htilominlo (aka) Nantaungmya is New Bagan’s most impressive pagoda.

Around Minnanthu Village & Pwasaw Village
Dhamayazika Pagoda
About 2 miles east of the New Bagan cross roads and standing north of the main road to airport and railway station, it was built by king Narapatisithu in AD 1196.

Leimyethna Pagoda
Almost 2 miles north east of Dhamayazika on the north side of the road near Minnanthu village this temple was built in AD 1222 by the couple of Anandathuya, minister of King Htilominlo.

Tayok Pye Min Pagoda
About 200 yd north of Leimyetha, it has lovely views from its upper level.

Payathonzu Pagoda
Across the main road from tayokpyemin, this complex of there interconnected shrines was supconstruction was completed-possibly due to the invasion of Kublai Khan.

Thambula Pagoda
Just north of Payathonzu , it was built in AD 1255 by Thambula, the queen of King Uzana.

Nandamannya Pagoda
About 220 yd north of Thanbula, this single-chambered temple with fine freescoes was built in the reign of King Narapatisithu early 13th century.

Hmya tha Umin & Tha-mee-whet Umin
Just southeast of Nyaung U and Northeast of Hnyetpyittaung, it is said to be built in 13th century.

Archaeological Museum
The Archaeological museum was inaugurated in 1904 by Mr.Tawseinkho, the inscription officer located near the Gawdawpalin Temple in Old Bagan, the two storied new building of Bagan Archaeological Museum was reconstructed in 1995 and opened in 17 Apirl 1998. Open from 9:30 AM to 3:00 PM hours daily except Mondays and Public Holiday.

Around Of Bagan
Tuyin Taung Pagoda
One the hilltop of Tuyin Taung, about 7 miles southeast of shwezigon, it is believed built by Anawyahta and shrined one of Buddha tooth replica.

Tantkyi Taung Pagoda
On the hill top of Tantkyi Taung, the other side of Ayeyawaddy, southwest of Bagan it is also believed built by Anawyahta and shined one of Buddha tooth replica.

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Find A best of journeys in Myanmar ! We are provide for also tailor made package and another travel services. That's why you can e-mail to us.
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reservation@asiatime.travel
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WELCOME TO OUR GOLDEN LAND (Myanmar)
Mingalarpar! This is our great pleasure to warmest greetings to all of visitors to Myanmar. Our Asia Time Travels & Tours Company is professional and trusted travel company for all customers who seeks to travel to Myanmar. Myanmar is also still possesses rich nature resources, numerous antique spectacular pagodas, monasteries and charming people, which position and entitle Myanmar as “The Golden Land”. Myanmar is uniquely blessed with snow amazing capped mountains and hilly regions, waterfalls, natural lakes, wide navigable rivers and a fertile delta region and unique archipelago. Cultural tourism is the main and other tourism activities such as hiking and trekking, biking, water rafting and hot air-balloon tours are enticing for all travelers. Visiting to Myanmar now and knowledge the wonders of the Myanmar (Burma). The capital of Myanmar is Naypyitaw and Yangon is the biggest business city. Mandalay has rich of cultural and traditional city of the country.

Myanmar (formerly BURMA), unique charm, rich cultural heritage, natural resources, smile faces, beautiful country which known as golden tourist destination. Myanmar is situated in South East Asia, link through borders with China at north, Laos and Thailand at east, and India and Bangladesh at west.

Myanmar has natural environment of tropical forest, beautiful lakes, River, green paddy field, Shan mountains, and archaeological places and, unspoiled. Myanmar people are friendly, hospitable and ready to give helping hands to visitors.

Location
Myanmar is located between latitudes 09 32 N and 28 31 N and longitudes 92 10 E and 101 11 E. It is situated in Southeast Asia and is bordered on the north and northeast by China; on the east and southeast by Laos and Thailand respectively; on the south by the Andaman Sea and the Bay of Bengal; and on the west by Bangladesh and India. The country covers an area of 677,000 square kilometres (261,228 square miles), ranging 936 kilometres (581 miles) from east to west and 2,051 kilometres (1,275 miles) from north to south.Myanmar shares a 2,185-kilometre border with China. The second-longest border is shared with Thailand (1,800 kilometres) followed by India (1,463 kilometres), Laos (235 kilometres) and Bangladesh (193 kilometres).

Geography
The country covers an area of 677,000 square kilometres (261,228 square miles) ranging 936 kilometres (581 miles) from east to west and 2,051 kilometres (1,275 miles) from north to south, It is a land of hills and valleys and is rimmed in the north, east and west by mountain ranges forming a giant horseshoe. Enclosed within the mountaion barriers are the flat lands of Ayeyarwaddy, Chindwin and Sittaung River valleys where most of the country's agricultural land and population are concentrated. The central lowlands are ringed by steep, rugged highlands. The lowest point is the Andaman Sea and the highest point is Mt Hkakabo Razi in Kachin State, at 5,881 meters.

Climate
Myanmar has three main seasons: a hot season, rainy season and cold season. Hot season is from March to May, rainy season is from June to October and cold season is from November to February. The tropical monsoon is usually cloudy and rainy, while hot season is hot and humid and the cold season features mild temperatures and lower humidity. Rainfall is scant in both summer and winter.

History
The earliest known primate is referred to as Pondaung Man – named after the area in northern Myanmar where he was found – who lived about 40 million years ago. More recently several city states emerged, followed by what are known as the three Myanmar Empires. The earliest major civilization was known as the Pyu. Later, King Anawrahta of Bagan (1044-1077AD) created the first Myanmar Empire. The second Myanmar Empire was created by King Bayinnaung of the Taungoo Dynasty (1551-1581AD), while the third MyanmarEmpire was led by King Alaungpaya of the Konbaung Dynasty (1752-1760AD).These three great kings are well-known in Myanmar history for their bravery and leadership. After the country fell under British rule In 1885, King Thibaw, Queen Supayalat and the royal family were taken to Ratanagiri in India. Myanmar remained a British colony until independence on January 4,1948.

People
Myanmar is made up of 135 national races, of which the main groups are Kachin, Kayah, Kayin, Chin, Bamar, Mon, Rakhine and Shan. Population is estimated to be more than 60 million, of which Bamar are thought to make up about two-thirds. The nationality is Myanmar. Some of the smaller ethnic groups include Akha, Palaung, Padaung, Naga, Taron and Eng. The mains religions are Buddhism, Christian and Muslim. The major language is Myanmar,but minority ethnic groups have their own languages. English is widely spoken and understood.

Religion
The main religions of the country are Buddhism (89.2%), Christianity (5.0%), Islam (3.8%), Hinduism (0.5%), Spiritualism (1.2%) and others (0.2%). Religious intolerance or discrimination on grounds of religion is nonexistent in the Union of Myanmar throughout its long history.

Language
Myanmar, the mother tongue of the Bamar and official language of Myanmar, is related to Tibetan and to the Chinese languages. It is written in a script consisting of circular and semi-circular letters, which were adapted from the Mon script, which in turn was developed from a southern Indian script in the 8th century. The earliest known inscriptions in the Myanmar script date from the 11th century. It is also used to write Pali, the sacred language of Theravada Buddhism, as well as several ethnic minority languages, including Shan, several Karen dialects, and Kayah (Karenni), with the addition of specialised characters and diacritics for each language. Myanmar is the official language. English is widely spoken and occasionally Cantonese and Mandarin.

Natural resources
Myanmar is rich in natural resources, including petroleum, timber, tin, antimony, zinc, copper, tungsten, lead, coal, marble, limestone, precious stones and natural gas.

Flora and Fauna
Myanmar is endowed with a rich diversity of habitat types arising largely from its unusual ecological diversity. It is home to nearly 300 known mammal species, 300 reptiles and about 100 birds species, and a haven for about 7,000 species of plant life. Since Myanmar considers such a rich pool of bio diversity as an important national asset, the Government has drawn up strict regulations to protect its biological resources.

Education
"Every school-age child in school" and "education for all" are the mottoes which guide Myanmar's educational efforts. In order to catch up with the information age all high schools and even primary schools are being equipped with computers to help students become familiar with electronic media. A complementary approach in education is to develop a healthy moral mind in a healthy active body. Schools train pupils in moral and social behaviour. As a further support toward this goal monastic schools have been received.

Festival
Myanmar is endowed with a rich diversity of habitat types arising largely from its unusual ecological diversity. It is home to nearly 300 known mammal species, 300 reptiles and about 100 birds species, and a haven for about 7,000 species of plant life. Since Myanmar considers such a rich pool of bio diversity as an important national asset, the Government has drawn up strict regulations to protect its biological resources.
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