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J. G. Coleman
103 followers -
Fine Art Landscape Photographer
Fine Art Landscape Photographer

103 followers
About
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Hey everyone, I wanted to take a moment to bid Google+ a fond farewell and let all of my great followers here know where they can continue seeing my work.

First, a quick explanation. Social media has become such a large component of photography promotion these days that it can actually take up a whole lot of time... time that could be getting put towards more shooting, more processing, more research and more business, in general. I'm not leaving social media, by any means, but I am trying to dial back the sheer volume of posting that has come to occupy my time every week. Unfortunately, Google+ is the first network that I've decided to step away from.

It's been fun and I am grateful for all of my followers here, which I believe number somewhere around 100 right now. Thanks for your support on Google+. I would be honored if you continued following my work, either at my website (JGCOLEMAN.COM) or on the social media networks on which I'll continue to operate (you can find them at my site).

Thanks again, everyone!
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Isaac's Light on the Hook
Sandy Hook Lighthouse, Gateway National Rec Area, Middletown, New Jersey, USA

At the time that the American Revolution broke out in the 1770s, there were just eleven lighthouses guiding mariners along the entire East Coast. In time, all but one fell to the rigors of warfare, fire, erosion and decay. The Sandy Hook Light, raised on a narrow spit of land at the southern entrance to New York Harbor in 1764, stands as the only colonial-era lighthouse left in the United States today.

Perhaps just as impressive as its longevity is the dramatic way in which the surrounding landscape has changed since its construction. Modern visitors may wonder why the Sandy Hook Light is peculiarly situated 1½ miles from the tip of Sandy Hook peninsula, despite historical records indicating that it was originally just 500 feet from land's end. The explanation is remarkable. Over 250 years, the persistent waves of the Atlantic managed to shift enough sand to gradually build more than a mile worth of beach where once there was open water, leaving the Sandy Hook Light peculiarly stranded far from the water’s edge.

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If you enjoy this image, please like it and share it with your friends.

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To buy a print of Isaac's Light on the Hook or inquire about licensing, visit my website:
https://www.jgcoleman.com/landscape-photography/beyond-the-northeast/gateway-national-recreation-area/gateway-national-recreation-area-02/

You can also see more of my work from Gateway National Recreation Area:
https://www.jgcoleman.com/landscape-photography/beyond-the-northeast/gateway-national-recreation-area/
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Abode of the Millwright's Ghost
Aspetuck Falls, Washington, Connecticut, USA

Born on the egress of Lake Waramaug, where Sucker Brook and nameless streamlets coalesce, the East Aspetuck is cast from a 20-foot cliff into a shadowy gorge in the heart of New Preston.

In all likelihood, it will never be known precisely when the first mill was constructed by frontiersmen along this auspicious cataract on the East Aspetuck. Colonial highway records passed down through the generations affirm that these waters were already churning out sawn timber by 1733, several decades before the “United States” even existed.

If you enjoy this image, please like it and share it with your friends.

To buy a print of Abode of the Millwright's Ghost or inquire about licensing, visit my website:
https://www.jgcoleman.com/…/aspetuck-fal…/aspetuck-falls-01/

You can also see more of my waterfall imagery at my Waterfalls of Connecticut collection:
https://www.connecticutwaterfalls.com/

#nature #landscape #waterfall #connecticut #newengland
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Pier Origins I
Walnut Beach, Milford, Connecticut, USA

Sandbars are carved from the Milford coast as the tide withdraws against an idyllic morning vista of Long Island Sound. A pier guides us into the breathtaking seascape, treating our gaze to miles of tranquil shores and the distant silhouette of Charles Island.

Native Americans living along the Sound had referred to Charles Island, probably for generations before European contact, as “Eaquahaug”. No record of the term’s meaning has survived, but stories passed down through the centuries tell of a sachem who was fond of residing upon the island throughout the summer months. Charles Island’s unique circumstances, whereby it’s accessible on foot during low tide but isolated a half-mile from shore during high tide, likely intrigued Natives back then just as it continues to fascinate us today.

Our modern name for the island can be traced back well over three centuries to 1657, when it was granted to a settler known as Charles Deal. While it may seem odd to our 21st century sensibilities, he was eager to use the 14-acre private island as a tobacco farm, of all things. Charles’ degree of success as an island-bound tobacco farmer seems to have been lost to history, and any trace of that old farm has long-vanished, but the island has somehow kept ahold of his name for 360 years and counting.

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If you enjoy this image, please like it and share it with your friends.

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To buy a print of Pier Origins I or inquire about licensing, visit my website:
http://www.jgcoleman.com/landscape-photography/connecticut/walnut-beach/walnut-beach-07/

You can also see more of my work from Walnut Beach:
http://www.jgcoleman.com/landscape-photography/connecticut/walnut-beach/walnut-beach-07/

#nature #connecticut #milfordct #beach #landscape #photography #newengland
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Wigwam Blue
Wigwam Reservoir, Thomaston, Connecticut, USA

A grove of pines stand shrouded with morning mist on the tranquil shores of Wigwam Reservoir, their towering trunks inverted in a mirror-like reflection upon the still water below.

While the Greater Hartford region and its thirst for water spawned such magnificent creations as the Barkhamsted Reservoir, several other cities elsewhere in Connecticut were similarly tasked around the turn of the 19th century with determining how they would bring sufficient water to their burgeoning populations. Waterbury, for example, is supplied by a system of five generous reservoirs, the first of which was Wigwam Reservoir up north in Thomaston on the West Branch of the Naugatuck River.

Construction of Wigwam Reservoir began in 1893 with the clearing of land and preliminary dam work. A pipeline measuring three feet in diameter was routed about 10 miles to Waterbury the next year and, by 1896, water was flowing. It wasn’t until 1901 that the dam was finally built up to its full height, inundating the hundred-acre basin of Wigwam Reservoir with more than 700 million gallons of water.

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If you enjoy this image, please like it and share it with your friends.

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To buy a print of Wigwam Blue or inquire about licensing, visit my website:
http://www.jgcoleman.com/landscape-photography/connecticut/wigwam-reservoir/wigwam-reservoir-01/

You can also see more of my work from Thomaston, Connecticut:
http://www.jgcoleman.com/landscape-photography/connecticut/thomaston-connecticut/

#connecticut #thomastonct #newengland #landscape #photography
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Randall Crossing at Lyndon
Randall Covered Bridge, Lyndon, Vermont, USA

Having spent more than a century and a half amidst the countryside of northeastern Vermont, the time-worn Randall Covered Bridge feels almost as natural a part of the scenery as the surrounding woodlands or the rushing waters of the Passumpsic’s East Branch below.

Randall Covered Bridge is truly a relic from a different era, its rough-hewn timbers assembled the same year that the Civil War came to a close at Appomattox some 600 miles to the south. Records don’t identify whoever was contracted to build the bridge, but the especially wide roof and open sides follow a distinctive pattern endemic to the township and surrounding area.

When the rigors of time and the unforgiving heft of automobiles finally rendered old Randall Bridge obsolete in the 1960s, the people of Lyndon had the foresight to keep the aged timber bridge intact. So, despite having been bypassed decades ago by a modern concrete crossing just 20 feet upstream, Randall Bridge quietly enjoys its 152nd anniversary this year. And with much care and a smidgeon of luck, it’ll be there for generations to come.

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If you enjoy this image, please like it and share it with your friends.

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To buy a print of Randall Crossing at Lyndon or inquire about licensing, visit my website:
http://www.jgcoleman.com/landscape-photography/vermont/randall-covered-bridge-lyndon-vt/randall-covered-bridge-lyndon-vt-01/

You can also see more of my work from Vermont:
http://www.jgcoleman.com/landscape-photography/vermont/

#vermont #lyndonvt #coveredbridge #newengland #passumpsic
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Yankee Farmlands № 98
New Hartford, Connecticut, USA

In the rural valley of Nepaug beneath the looming silhouette of Yellow Mountain, farmland is daubed with molten light upon awakening to another January morning. A dirt road creased with frozen ruts weaves amidst piled fieldstones, timbers and greenhouses before vanishing into the farm’s interior.

Although many of Connecticut’s towns have existed for centuries, their configurations have changed dramatically over time. For example, in the 1720s, New Hartford’s pioneering farmers from the Connecticut Colony settled at Town Hill just north of Yellow Mountain (which would’ve been on the far side of the hill as it’s seen in this piece) and thought of their village as the “town center” for next 100 years.

By the 1820s, though, the village of Nepaug emerged as the new town center when its productive streamside mills became the focal point of the community. But even Nepaug would eventually pass the torch when, in the 1870s, New Hartford’s very first Town Hall was built in the district of North Village. North Village had simply outgrown Nepaug during the intervening five decades and, to this very day, it still claims the unofficial designation of town center.



To buy a print of Yankee Farmlands № 98 or inquire about licensing, visit my website:
http://www.jgcoleman.com/photography-projects/yankee-farmlands/new-hartford-ct-yankee-farmlands-98/

You can also see more work from my Yankee Farmlands project:
http://www.jgcoleman.com/photography-projects/yankee-farmlands/

#connecticut #newengland #farm #landscape #photography
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Bouquet by the Water’s Edge
West Hartford Reservoirs, West Hartford, Connecticut, USA

Writing in the 1890s for his book “Poems of New England”, J. H. Earle kicked off “A Summer Hour” with a few soothing lines:

“Great the joy there is in silence
When the mind is free,
For then we here with nature talk,
And all seems in glee.

“Especially when summer breezes
Waft the teeming earth,
And all landscapes seem to flourish
In nature’s glad birth.”

Earle probably didn’t spend much time with early cameras, but I’m fairly certain that modern landscape photography taps in to the very same vein of inspiration from which he crafted his poetry.

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If you enjoy this image, please share it with your friends.

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To buy a print of Bouquet by the Water’s Edge or inquire about licensing, visit my website:
http://www.jgcoleman.com/landscape-photography/connecticut/west-hartford-reservoirs/west-hartford-reservoirs-01/

You can also see more of my work from the West Hartford Reservoirs:
http://www.jgcoleman.com/landscape-photography/connecticut/west-hartford-reservoirs/

#connecticut #westhartford #newengland #landscape #nature #photography
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Yankee Farmlands № 97
Lyme, Connecticut, USA

Snow-capped silos in tower over a complex of barns amidst the low hills of Southeastern Connecticut. A fieldstone wall encloses the barnyards, the loosely piled boulders obscured beneath drifts and tangles of leaf-bare briars.

#connecticut #winter #snow #landscape #newengland #barn #farm #farming #agriculture

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Bantam with Grace
Morris, Connecticut, USA

Lily pads dot the still waters of Bantam Lake as morning twilight coaxes delicate colors from the sky and distant, mist-veiled shores.

Although there are impounded reservoirs far larger within Connecticut, Bantam Lake’s 950 acres of picturesque water comprise the largest natural lake in the state. Perhaps it’s especially fitting then that about 60% of the Bantam lakeshore is contained within one of Connecticut’s largest nature preserves, the 4,000-acre White Memorial Foundation.

Captivated by the lake’s beauty, wealthy siblings Alain and May White created the White Memorial Foundation in 1913 with all of the surrounding land they had managed to acquire since 1908. In that era, their vision for conservation was met by resistance and skepticism, but the sprawling preserve that bears their name today stands as a celebrated accomplishment.

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If you enjoy this image, please like it and share it with your friends.

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To buy a print of Bantam with Grace or inquire about licensing, visit my website:
http://www.jgcoleman.com/landscape-photography/connecticut/bantam-lake/bantam-lake-connecticut-01/

You can also see more of my work from Bantam Lake:
http://www.jgcoleman.com/landscape-photography/connecticut/bantam-lake/

#connecticut #morris #litchfield #nature #newengland #bantamlake #whitememorial #sunrise #landscape #photography
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