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Michael Gartenberg
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Michael Gartenberg

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It helps a lot if you're entire org and livelihood are dependent on Google services :)
 
+Louis Gray I'm wondering if you know the answer to this or can find someone who knows.

How do Googlers use Chromebooks? What I mean by that is: clearly there's much development going on at Google. Is that done on Chromebooks using Chrome OS, remote desktops, virtualization or some other platform/device?

I ask because I'm within a whisker of buying a Pixel. You've seen my comments on it: Love it. And for my everyday workflow where I live in the web, it works great. 

But I also take programming classes online - I can do the classwork in the cloud but writing some Python code or kicking the tires of Javascript / other things may not lend itself well to a Chromebook. Or does it? ;)

Thanks in advance for any info you can share! And I made this public so others can possibly learn more about how Chromebooks fit in at Google. Hope you don't mind. :)
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hello micheal?????????
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Michael Gartenberg

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Foo Fighters :) 
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Michael Gartenberg

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Last year 4s was "panned" as not innovative enough. Went on to be Apple's best selling phone ever. 
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And will happen again next year.
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Michael Gartenberg

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So, which is healthier? #discuss   someone who's a little more health conscious these days this is the stuff that drives me crazy. As an average consumer, shopping in the store, at a glance, which of these is healthier? First, it's hard to compare just calories as each one offers a different serving size so be prepared to do a little math. Then look at the sugars and fiber in each (just as comparisons). The highest calorie cereal also has the least sugar and the most fiber. So I ask again. Which of these is the healthiest to buy? I'm not a particularly stupid person (at least I like to think so) but it took me a year of researching the topic, reading closely and I'm still not entirely sure what the correct answer is... This is the point where I want to say to hell with it and just go get a box of Dunkin' Donuts. End of rant. 
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ray montalvo's profile photomike dunn's profile photoMichael Gartenberg's profile photoSusan Robbins's profile photo
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Good point, and good suggestion
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Michael Gartenberg

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Signs and portents? Uh oh.
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MORCELLATION SURGERY CAUSING CANCER SPREAD: INFORMED CONSENT AND MEDICAL MALPRACTICE
Steven E. North, Esq.
Shari James, Paralegal
 
Uterine cancer and the fear of the spread of the disease is a major concern for women. With approximately 500,000 hysterectomies performed a year in the U.S., mostly because of benign fibroid tumors, women now have to consider whether or not the surgical removal of the organ or tumor will cause the spread of cancer or exacerbate their condition.
 
A somewhat controversial procedure, known as morcellation, utilizes a device – a morcellator - similar to a power tool, to remove large fibroids and even the uterus by “grinding up” the tissue so that the resulting smaller fragments can then be removed through incisions in a minimally invasive surgery procedure.
 
Physicians who tout the morcellation procedure over the conventional open abdominal surgery maintain that this surgery is minimally invasive with smaller scars, quicker recovery and shorter hospital stays. They discount the theory that their surgery has a significant potential of spreading cancer.
 
An article in The New York Times, February 7, 2014, “Uterine Surgical Technique Is Linked to Abnormal Growths and Cancer Spread” and a December 18, 2013 article in The Wall Street Journal, “Doctors Eye Cancer Risk in Procedure” discuss the controversy in the medical community regarding morcellation. Some contend that the procedure “may lead to dissemination of malignant tissue thereby causing metastatic disease.” The grinding of growths, such as fibroids, which might be thought to be benign, may in fact contain occult cancer cells which are only discovered when the post-operative pathology is performed. It is maintained by some that such surgery will disseminate the cancer throughout the body rather than contain the disease which would be the case if the specimen had been removed in one piece by conventional surgery. And others say that spread of even benign tissue may cause multiple growths to develop in the abdomen.
 
An article submitted to the New England Journal of Medicine by four Boston-area doctors, maintains that there is a significant number of women with undetected cancer within the fibroids, and the morcellation procedure in some cases is “tripling the odds of death within five years.” With an estimated 20-40% of women over the age of 35 developing fibroids, though usually benign, the chance of spreading cancer is relatively high. Two articles published on February 6, 2014 in The Journal of the American Medical Association discuss the problem.
 
Like any other medical procedure, patients have a right to know their surgical options and to make their own informed choice as to whether or not they wish to proceed with the procedure. They are entitled to be informed of all the significant considerations associated with the proposed surgery. And if potential surgery is thought to cause the spread of cancer rather than protect against it, the patient should be informed of that.
 
Informed consent plays a major role in providing care to a patient. There should be verbal communication between the healthcare provider and the patient before the patient chooses to undergo a particular treatment. A written consent form is not a substitute for the required discussion between doctor and patient. The patient must be made to understand the potential benefits of the procedure, the reasonable risks and complications involved, and alternatives as well as the health risk associated with foregoing the procedure.
 
A medical malpractice claim based upon lack of informed consent, where  a physician fails to disclose the appropriate information to a patient, especially when an alternative method of treatment is available may sometimes be hard to prove but can lead to substantial recoveries.
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Michael Gartenberg

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I'm now over my Twitter limit. 
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Michael Gartenberg

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Bat Mitzvah. :)
 
Bat Mitzvah
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Maurice Kessler's profile photoCal vin's profile photo
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As long as he's not the mohel.
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Michael Gartenberg

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This piece is a little harsh but underscores the challenge of an engineering company that's in a social driven world. Nexus Q is a good example of a beautiful product, meticulously designed and engineered that no consumer will want or even know how to use. Nexus 7 on the other hand shows Google can adapt and create things that solve problems. Nexus 7 is more like Gmail. Nexus Q is more like Google Buzz. As for Glass? At the moment it's the hardware equivalent of Google Wave. That said Google is rapidly becoming indispensable to many consumers. In an era driven by personal cloud services that's more important than a device misstep. Or two.
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Google is developing what I call the Adobe problem. Adobe's products all have a version that was a balance between real features & add-ons. But as a public company its not enough to design & create the best solution: You also have to do it again next year.  
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Michael Gartenberg

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As noted last night. Trying to capture the moment as opposed to living in the moment isn't a new phenomena. Here's what I wrote on this in 2004

"I went to the first grade choir last evening at my nieces school. You see, only a few of us in the audience were actually watching the performance. The bulk of the participants were so busy attempting to capture elements of the performance for digital posterity, that I suspect very few actually got to enjoy and experience the moment live. There were the still camera folks, desperately trying to coax more power from the flash of their pocket cameras to illuminate the auditorium (most of these are useless beyond five feet) or turning the flash off and then trying to hold the camera steady. Then there were the camcorders, complete with wires, scuffles for position and tripods. Lots of folks got to see this lovely performance through a 2 inch LCD screen. I could go on about the folks with the cameraphones, but I won't bother.

The attempt to record live events for posterity is nothing new but the plethora of digital technologies that aim to make this all happen is. Sadly, many of these recordings won't be viewable years down the road, anymore than I watch my Dad's old video reels, play his 78s or even look at the mini camcorder tapes I shot just a few years ago (as I no longer have a deck that plays that format). If you're going to a school pageant, play or performance, take my advice and put the camera down so you can enjoy the show while it's happening. Then take a few shots afterward to capture the moment and preserve the memory."
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