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JoJo Chinook
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JoJo Chinook

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Dr Tennari is calling for 1,000 medical workers to join his call to the UN Security Council to enforce its own resolutions and stop the chemical attacks. Please send this email to any medical workers you know - doctors, nurses, paramedics or health care workers. If you are a medical worker sign up here

On the night of March 16, only one month ago, as I heard the helicopters overhead at about 8:30pm, an announcement blared through my walkie talkie and through the mosque speakers of Sarmin that there were explosive barrel bombs that had been dropped. They said that the barrels were filled with poisonous gas - it was a chemical attack. Voices shouted for people to avoid the area where the barrels were dropped and to go to higher ground for safety.
I immediately left my house and drove to my field hospital, hoping that the injuries would be minor and fearing for my family. Sarmin had never before experienced a chemical attack. As soon as I left my house, I could smell the odour of bleach. When I arrived to the hospital, a wave of people had already begun to arrive. They were all experiencing symptoms of exposure to a choking agent like chlorine gas. Everyone was decontaminated with water before coming into the hospital, and their clothes were taken off of them. Dozens of people had difficulty breathing, with their eyes and throats burning, and many began secreting from the mouth. We lay people on the floor as the beds filled up. Our humble field hospital became chaotic. We tried our best to give people oxygen and hydrocortisone nebulisers to stabilise their breathing. Moderate cases were injected with hydrocortisone, and the severe cases required Atropine injections. The first wave of 50 people came from the Qaminas village, less than 10 minutes away from Sarmin. We saw 20 additional people from the western neighbourhood of Sarmin - the wind had blown the chemical agent in that direction.
I am the medical director of a field hospital in Sarmin, Idlib. It is the area that I grew up in. Sarmin is an old suburban town outside of Idlib city, with ruins that have been around for more than two thousands years. It is springtime in Idlib, which brings beautiful nature and the green leaves of thousands of olive trees. I am a radiologist by training, but since the conflict in Syria began, I have been working in general emergency medicine to help those affected by the daily bombings. I helped to establish the field hospital in Sarmin four years ago. We are currently using the fourth building to house the field hospital - the first two were flattened to the ground. Hospitals are targeted by the government in Syria, and our field hospital has been hit by bombs and missiles 17 times.
On that Monday in March, above the chaotic sounds of my hospital, I continued to hear the loud wings of helicopters. As we were finishing treating these victims, another wave of patients arrived at our hospital. Two more barrel bombs had been dropped on the southeastern neighbourhood along the main corniche. Thirty more people spilled into my field hospital, and there would have been many more had the radio not alarmed our town to the attacks.
Among the people who entered, I saw my friend Waref Taleb. He ran an electronics repair shop in town, and recently helped to fix my phone. He, his wife, his mother, and his three young children - all under the age of three - were a sickly pale colour when they arrived, a sign of severe lack of oxygen and chemical exposure. In the most severe cases of chlorine exposure, your lungs fill with fluid and you suffocate. We immediately intubated Waref and gave him CPR, and rinsed off his wife and gave her Atropine. His mother was already dead when she arrived. We worked quickly to treat three-year-old Aisha, two-year-old Sara, and one-year-old Mohammad, giving them oxygen and injecting them with Atropine. Mohammad was foaming at the mouth. We were forced to treat Sara and Aisha on the body of their dead grandmother. As quickly as we worked, we could not save them. In a short period of time, Waref and his wife’s symptoms progressed rapidly, and they too died. 
We learned from civil defenders who rushed the Taleb family to the hospital that the barrel bombs filled with chlorine had hit their house as they hid in the basement. In our daily barrel bomb attacks, it is safest to go to the basements of houses, but for a chemical attack like this, basements are the worst place you can be. Chlorine is thicker than air. One of the barrel bombs fell through a shaft in their home, filling the ventilation with gas when it broke open and released chlorine. Their basement became a makeshift gas chamber.
Altogether that night, we saw 120 people. There were only five physicians, including myself, and about 15 nurses working at the hospital. Many civil defenders and medical staff, including me, experienced symptoms of chemical exposure from such close contact with the patients. As I worked, my chest became tighter and tighter, and I had a hard time breathing. My throat was burning. The young nurse who took care of baby Mohammed had symptoms of a critical level. The entire hospital smelled like bleach that night.
I wish that I could say that this night was unique, but it was not. Since the night of March 16, our field hospital has seen victims from five additional chemical attacks in Sarmin and the neighbouring towns. On April 16, one month after the attack that killed the Taleb family, I testified about my experiences in front of the United Nations Security Council in a meeting hosted by US Ambassador Samantha Power. After watching a video I showed of Sara, Aisha, and Mohammed dying in our hospital, many of the Security Council members were in tears. But we need much more than tears. Those who have the right to tears for these attacks are the people of Syria. From the Security Council, we need action. Less than two hours after the Security Council meeting, I got word from my hospital that they were receiving victims from yet another chemical attack in Idlib city. 
After four years of conflict in Syria, I have more friends who have been killed than I have who are alive. I have seen too many people from my community take their last breath at my hospital. The hardest part is knowing every day that it will happen again - you will see more of your friends come in on stretchers, you will see more children die in front of you, you will again fear for your family as you hear the sounds of helicopters above. This life is not human.
In response to chemical attacks in Syria, the international community sends us more Atropine. This is disappointing. This means that the world knows that the Assad government will use chemical weapons against us again. What we need is not Atropine - what we urgently need is protection from the bombs, with a no-fly zone if necessary. What we need is to prevent another family from slowly suffocating together after being gassed in their home. What we need is for the United Nations to enforce their own resolutions

https://medicsunderfire.org/en
The head doctor of one of Syria’s field hospitals is asking for medical workers around the world to join his call to the UN. Please share with medics.
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JoJo Chinook

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How lucky are we in Australia when latest figures show that eight people are day are suiciding? What the hell has happened to the people of this Country that death looks better?  I listen to Syrian refugees fighting for life with no homes, no food, no hope and yet others here throw their lives away when help is only a phone call away. Sad state of affairs when we want for nothing !
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+Jill Mackenzie With friends like you I have every reason to be grateful.
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JoJo Chinook

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Out of sight out of mind I guess for the Abbott Government when it comes to dealing with our Asylum seekers........... Shame on you :(
Australia's $40 million resettlement deal with Cambodia was signed last year, but so far no refugees have been sent to the impoverished nation.
The deal has been condemned by the United Nations' refugee agency and human rights advocates.
In a statement released after the deal was signed, the UN High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) said it was "deeply concerned" by the precedent the deal sets.
The UNHCR reiterated its stance that asylum seekers should "benefit from the protection" of the state in which they arrive.
Human rights and aid groups working in Cambodia called the deal "shameful", and said the country had a terrible record of protecting refugees.
"It is shameful but it is also illegal," Cambodia's Centre for Human Rights president Virak Ou said, adding that Cambodia was in "no position to take refugees".
"We are a poor country, the health system is sub-par at most. The Cambodian school system is rife with corruption."
The resettlement agreement stipulates refugees will only be sent on a voluntary basis, with the number of refugees accepted to be determined by Cambodia.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-04-16/nauru-refugees-to-be-transferred-to-cambodia/6396218?section=world
A charter flight to transfer the first group of refugees from Nauru to Cambodia has been scheduled for next Monday.
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Imagine, just for a moment, that the Socceroos, the Hockeyroos, the Wallabies or the Matildas are about to depart for the biggest sports match in Australian history.
But instead of waltzing through passport control and flying out of Sydney airport in first-class comfort, they have to go through three overland border crossings manned by the militaries of three different countries, with no guarantee they will be permitted to leave.
It is unimaginable — unless you are Palestinian.
While other teams competing at the 2015 Asian Cup in January arrived in Australia without issue, for the Palestinians, just making it out of their nascent state — which is not yet recognised by Australia — was a battle in itself.
With no international airport in the West Bank or Gaza, their football players faced a geopolitical steeplechase out of the Palestinian Territories, past Israeli and Jordanian border patrols at Allenby Bridge and on to Amman airport before the short haul to Dubai and then the long haul to Australia.
But the complicated journey, filmed by a team for the ABC's Foreign Correspondent program, was just one of the many hurdles faced by the footballers.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-04-14/palestinians-national-football-team-battle-to-get-to-australia/6384818
For the Palestinian team that competed at the 2015 Asian Cup, just making it out of their nascent state – which is not yet recognised by Australia – was a battle in itself.
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I love this story <3 Well done boys !!!
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JoJo Chinook

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How long would you put your life on hold?

http://lifeonhold.aljazeera.com/#/en/loading
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JoJo Chinook

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What a tragic unavoidable loss of life . R.I.P. Sweet Baby Israa ........... Baby Israa al-Masri died of a hunger-related illness on January 11, 2014 in the Yarmouk camp [AP]
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+Siam Siam Thanks Siam ...... What sort of work did you do ? I am glad you have a strong stomach because that was gut wrenching. I feel for the dog too it's horrible to see them suffering.  
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JoJo Chinook

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How could that make you smile ? Heartless !
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+Michelle Thomasson I was a bit lost for words too :( 
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Make the World a happier place ........
 
The future will be in the hands of those of you who belong to the 21st century. You have the opportunity and responsibility to build a better humanity. This means developing warm-heartedness in this very life, here and now. So, do whatever work you do, but ask yourselves now and then, "How can I contribute to human beings being happier and more peaceful?"
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What happened to protecting our kids in 2015?
 
The 12 years old Mahmoud Elbatroukh who was attacked yesterday (5 April 2015) by Jewish settlers in occupied Jerusalem.

Via Younes Arar
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All you bastards go to Hell you monsters Dont deserve to breathe air for all the innocent blood and suffering you caused!!!! Damn you all to Hell!!!!
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in 2015 It is disgraceful to think we treat our children this way.........

Dheisheh, Occupied Palestinian Territories - Ahmed Odeh was watching a YouTube video about the abysmal conditions in the Palestinian refugee camp of Yarmouk, near Syria's war-torn capital Damascus. A small girl in the video was crying and shouting, "I'm hungry, I'm hungry."
After watching the video, "I had the idea to make a campaign to help these people," said Odeh.
So he gathered a group of his Palestinian friends from the Dheisheh refugee camp in Bethlehem, where he lives, and they made a plan. The group decided to start an effort called "Life Line" to collect aid for Palestinian refugees in Yarmouk, which - like many areas in Syria - is surrounded by fighting between forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad and rebel factions trying to overthrow him.
The Syrian civil war has now raged for nearly three years with 130,000 killed and no end in sight.  
In the Yarmouk camp, more than 55 people have died from hunger and the majority of children are suffering from malnutrition, according to Abdullah al-Khatib, a Palestinian activist living there. Most people are consuming soup made from water and spices, Khatib said, and some are reportedly eating grass for survival.

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2014/01/starving-death-syria-yarmouk-camp-201412974852695717.html
Fighting has cut off food and medical supplies to 18,000 desperate refugees.
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Thinking of all those families and children trapped in the Yarmouk camp right now. All roads in Damascus are currently blocked ..............

Civilians trapped in a Palestinian refugee camp in Syria's capital have fled to safer areas amid intense shelling and clashes between Palestinian armed factions and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) fighters who took over most of the camp, Syrian activists said.
ISIL fighters stormed the Yarmouk camp in southern Damascus on Wednesday, marking the group's deepest foray yet into the city.

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2015/04/isil-seizes-syria-yarmouk-refugee-camp-150404135525226.html
Thousands of Palestinians trapped in Damascus district, where heavy shelling has been reported since Wednesday.
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