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JoJo Chinook
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On a busy high street in northern Jordan, shoppers bustle past the stalls selling toys, shoes, bikes and kettles. In a kitchen nearby, a baker bakes the next day’s bread. Across town, a couple prepare for their wedding, while a young boy prepares to return to school.
My favourite thing about Refugee Camp: Our Desert Home (BBC2) is that it portrays the residents of Zaatari, Jordan’s fourth-biggest city, as just normal people. But the title gives the game away. Zaatari isn’t a normal town. It’s the world’s biggest Syrian refugee camp. And just four years ago, none of its 80,000 residents lived there.
If you haven’t heard of Zaatari, you might have seen it in photos. It’s often used to show the scale of the Syrian refugee crisis (which has created more than five million refugees, and counting), usually broadcast as an aerial photo of the camp. Endless rows of prefab containers stretch into the desert – reminding us just how insulated Europe has been from the reality of the crisis.
Our life in the Zaatari refugee camp: no electricity, no space to sleep, no escape
Abu Amar
My family and I have been here for two years now. For my children’s sake, I wish other countries would open their doors to us Syrian refugees

Read more
Refugee Camp takes us down to ground level. We meet Ziad, a grandfather who, despite living in the desert, has managed to cultivate a small herb garden outside his back door. Today, he’s planting a lemon tree.
In one of Zaatari’s 11 hospitals, we come across Muhammad, a boy with a badly damaged leg who is waiting for the go-ahead to return to school. Across town, we watch Moussa’s last shave before his wedding – and then follow Mataba, his fiancee, as she picks a bridal gown. Zaatari has more than 3,000 businesses, one of which sells wedding dresses – much to the surprise of Anita Rani, the most engaging of the show’s three presenters.
“This isn’t what I was expecting at all,” Rani says. “This is my first time in a refugee camp, so maybe this isn’t a typical setup.”
She’s right, actually. Half an hour away, there’s another camp, Azraq, where the Jordanian government rarely allow journalists, let alone a BBC documentary team. Conditions at Azraq are far more depressing, according to aid workers who deliver services there.

https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2016/jul/22/refugee-camp-our-desert-home-review-step-inside-the-worlds-largest-sanctuary-for-syrians
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A sad-eyed Pikachu character sits amidst the rubble on a Syrian street, while Charizard is perched alongside gun-toting jihadists.
The striking montages are the work of Syrian Khaled Akil, one of several activists and artists using the international frenzy over Pokemon Go to draw new attention to the plight of their battle-scarred country.
In the images posted on Akil's website, characters from the wildly popular smartphone app are placed into news photographs of scenes from the conflict in Syria, which is now in its sixth year and has killed more than 280,000 people.
One image appears to show the aftermath of bombardment, with facades sheared from buildings and smoke rising from the blackened carcass of a car.
A child walks across the rubble strewn throughout the street, atop which sits the yellow Pikachu character, his tall ears flopping down.
In another image, a boy wheels his bicycle down a devastated street, with the turquoise-green Vaporeon character by his side.
#savetherest   #savethesyrianchildren   #wakeupworld   #breakthesilence   #Pokemongo  
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-22/syrians-use-pokemon-to-appeal-for-help/7654096
The characters from the Pokemon Go game are being used to draw new attention to the plight of Syrians.
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+Bassam Ibn Falesteen Thankyou Bassam  
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American doctors are risking their lives to help victims of airstrikes in one of the world's most dangerous cities, #Aleppo in #Syria.
Orthopaedic surgeon Sam Attar, critical care specialist Zaher Sahloul and paediatrician John Kahler are all doctors from Chicago.
They went to Syria to volunteer and were some of the last people to get out of Aleppo before it was cut off from the world this week, after regime forces took control of the last road leading into the city on Sunday.
"These are innocent #civilians and if the world doesn't act they will just be left to starve and be bombed to death," Dr Attar told 7.30 after returning from his most recent trip.
The road into Aleppo is one of the most dangerous journeys in the world.
"We've seen the car wrecks that are completely burnt, we've seen trucks that are turned upside down on the other side, we smelled dead bodies, looks like there's disintegrating dead bodies that are still trapped in the cars and people are not able or not daring to pull them out," Dr Sahloul, who is also the chair of the Syrian American Medical Society, told 7.30.
"It was really terrible trip and every second we were at the risk of shelling."

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-20/aleppo-american-doctors-risk-lives-to-help-bombing-victims/7644982
American doctors are risking their lives to help victims of airstrikes in Aleppo, Syria.
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What is PTSD?
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can develop following a traumatic event that threatens your safety or makes you feel helpless. Most people associate PTSD with rape and battle-scarred soldiers—and military combat is the most common cause in men—but any event (or series of events) that overwhelms you with feelings of hopelessness and helplessness can trigger PTSD, especially if the event feels unpredictable and uncontrollable. PTSD can affect:
People who personally experience the traumatic event
Those who witness the event
Those who pick up the pieces afterwards, such as emergency workers
Friends or family members of those who experienced the trauma
Traumatic events that can cause PTSD include:
War
Natural disasters
Car or plane crashes
Terrorist attacks
Sudden death of a loved one
Rape
Kidnapping
Assault
Sexual or physical abuse
Childhood neglect

PTSD symptoms: Everyone is different
PTSD develops differently from person to person. While the symptoms of PTSD most commonly develop in the hours or days following the traumatic event, it can sometimes take weeks, months, or even years before they appear. There are three main types of symptoms:
Re-experiencing the traumatic event. This may include upsetting memories, flashbacks, and nightmares, as well as feelings of distress or intense physical reactions when reminded of the event (sweating, pounding heart, nausea, for example).
Avoiding reminders of the trauma. You may try to avoid activities, places or thoughts that remind you of the trauma or be unable to remember important aspects of the event. You may feel detached from others and emotionally numb, or lose interest in activities and life in general, sensing only a limited future for yourself. 
Increased anxiety and emotional arousal. These symptoms include trouble sleeping, irritability or outbursts of anger, difficulty concentrating, feeling jumpy and easily startled, and hypervigilance (on constant “red alert”).
Other common symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
Guilt, shame, or self-blame
Substance abuse
Feelings of mistrust and betrayal
Depression and hopelessness
Suicidal thoughts and feelings
Physical aches and pains
Symptoms of PTSD in children
In children—especially very young children—the symptoms of PTSD can be different from adults and may include:
Fear of being separated from parent
Losing previously-acquired skills (such as toilet training)
Sleep problems and nightmares
Somber, compulsive play in which themes or aspects of the trauma are repeated
New phobias and anxieties that seem unrelated to the trauma (such as a fear of monsters)
Acting out the trauma through play, stories, or drawings
Aches and pains with no apparent cause
Irritability and aggression
PTSD symptoms: How PTSD affects your nervous system
When your sense of safety is shattered by a traumatic event, it’s normal to have bad dreams, feel fearful, and find it difficult to stop thinking about what happened. For most people, these symptoms gradually lift over time. But this normal response to trauma becomes PTSD when the symptoms don’t ease up and your nervous system gets "stuck." 
Your nervous system has three ways of responding to stressful events:
Social engagement with another person—making eye contact, listening in an attentive way, talking—can quickly calm you down and put the brakes on defensive responses like “fight-or-flight.”
Mobilization, or fight-or-flight, occurs when social engagement isn’t appropriate and you need to defend yourself or escape the danger of a traumatic event. The heart pounds faster, blood pressure rises, and muscles tighten, increasing your strength and reaction speed. Once the danger has passed, the nervous system calms your body, lowering heart rate and blood pressure, and winding back down to its normal balance.
Immobilization occurs when you’ve experienced an overwhelming amount of stress in a situation and, while the immediate danger has passed, you find yourself “stuck.” Your nervous system is unable to return to its normal state of balance and you’re unable to move on from the event. This is PTSD.
PTSD self-help tip 1: Get moving
As well as releasing endorphins and making you feel better, by really focusing on your body and how it feels as you move, exercise can help your nervous system become “unstuck”.
Any rhythmic exercise that engages both your arms and legs—such as walking, running, swimming, or dancing—works well if instead of focusing on your thoughts, you focus on how your body feels.
Notice the sensation of your feet hitting the ground, for example, or the rhythm of your breathing, or the feeling of the wind on your skin.
Rock climbing, boxing, weight training, or martial arts can make it easier to focus on your body movements—after all, if you don’t, you could get hurt.
Aim to exercise for 30 minutes or more each day—or if it’s easier, three 10-minute spurts of exercise .

Spend time in nature
Pursuing outdoor activities like hiking, camping, mountain biking, rock climbing, whitewater rafting, and skiing helps veterans cope with PTSD symptoms and transition back into civilian life. Anyone with PTSD can benefit from the relaxation, seclusion, and peace that come with being out in nature. Seek out local organizations that offer outdoor recreation or teambuilding opportunities.
PTSD self-help tip 2: Self-regulate your nervous system
Learning that you can change your arousal system and calm yourself can directly challenge the sense of helplessness that is a common symptom of PTSD.
Mindful breathing is a quick way to calm yourself. Simply take 60 breaths, focusing your attention on each out breath.
Sensory input. Just as specific sights, noises, or smells can instantly transport you back to the traumatic event, so too can sensory input quickly calm you down. The key is to find the sensory input that works for you. Does listening to an uplifting song make you feel calm? Or smelling ground coffee or a certain brand of cologne? Or maybe petting an animal works quickly to make you feel at ease? Everyone responds to sensory input a little differently, so experiment to find what works best for you.
Reconnect emotionally. Reconnecting to uncomfortable emotions without becoming overwhelmed can make a huge difference in your ability to manage stress, balance your moods, and take back control of your life. See our Emotional Intelligence Toolkit.
PTSD self-help tip 3: Connect with others
Support from other people is vital to your recovery from PTSD. Social interaction with someone who cares about you is the most effective way to calm your nervous system, so it’s important to find someone you can connect with face to face—someone you can talk to for an uninterrupted period of time, someone who will listen to you without judging, criticizing, or continually being distracted. That person may be your significant other, a family member, a friend, or professional therapist.
If connecting is difficult
No matter how close you are to the person or how helpful they try to be, the symptoms of PTSD that leave your nervous system feeling “stuck” can also make it difficult to connect to others. If you still don’t feel any better after talking, there are ways to help the process along.
Exercise or move. Before chatting with a friend, either exercise or move around. Jump up and down, swing your arms and legs, or just flail around. Your head will feel clearer and you’ll find it easier to connect.
Vocal toning. As strange as it sounds, vocal toning is a great way to open up your nervous system to social engagement—even if you can’t sing or consider yourself tone-deaf. Sit up straight and with your lips together and teeth slightly apart, simply make “mmmm” sounds. Change the pitch and volume until you experience a pleasant vibration in your face. Practice for a few minutes and notice if the vibration spreads to your heart and stomach.
Volunteering your time or reaching out to a friend in need is not only a great way to connect to others but can also help you reclaim your sense of power. Joining a PTSD support group can help you feel less isolated and alone and also provide invaluable information on how to cope with symptoms and work towards recovery.
PTSD self-help tip 4: Take care of yourself
The symptoms of PTSD can be hard on your body so it’s important to take care of yourself and develop some healthy lifestyle habits.
Take time to relax. Relaxation techniques such as meditation, deep breathing, massage, or yoga can activate the body’s relaxation response and ease symptoms of PTSD.
Avoid alcohol and drugs. When you’re struggling with difficult emotions and traumatic memories, you may be tempted to self-medicate with alcohol or drugs. But substance use worsens many symptoms of PTSD, interferes with treatment, and can add to problems in your relationships.
Eat a healthy diet. Start your day right with breakfast, and keep your energy up and your mind clear with balanced, nutritious meals throughout the day. Omega-3s play a vital role in emotional health so incorporate foods such as fatty fish, flaxseed, and walnuts into your diet. Limit processed food, fried food, refined starches, and sugars, which can exacerbate mood swings and energy fluctuations.
Get enough sleep. Sleep deprivation exacerbates anger, irritability, and moodiness. Aim for somewhere between 7 to 9 hours of sleep each night. Develop a relaxing bedtime ritual (listen to calming music, watch a funny show, or read something light) and make your bedroom as quiet, dark, and soothing as possible.
Helping a loved one with PTSD
When a loved one has PTSD, it takes a heavy toll on your relationship and family life. You may have to take on a bigger share of household tasks, deal with the frustration of a loved one who won’t open up, or even deal with anger or disturbing behavior.  The symptoms of PTSD can also result in job loss, substance abuse, and other stressful problems.
Don’t pressure your loved one into talking. It is often very difficult for people with PTSD to talk about their trauma. For some, it can even make things worse. Never try to force your loved one to open up. Comfort often comes from your companionship and acceptance, rather than from talking.
Let your loved one take the lead, rather than telling him or her what to do. Take cues from your loved one as to how you can best provide support and companionship—that may involve talking about the traumatic event over and over again, or it may involve simply hanging out together.
Manage your own stress. The more calm, relaxed, and focused you are, the better you’ll be able to help a loved one with PTSD.
Try to prepare for PTSD triggers. Common triggers include anniversary dates; people or places associated with the trauma; and certain sights, sounds, or smells. If you are aware of the triggers that may cause an upsetting reaction, you’ll be in a better position to help your loved one calm down.
Don’t take the symptoms of PTSD personally. If your loved one seems distant, irritable, angry, or closed off, remember that this may not have anything to do with you or your relationship.
Educate yourself about PTSD. The more you know about the symptoms, effects, and treatment, the better equipped you'll be to help your loved one, understand what he or she is going through, and keep things in perspective.
Take care of yourself. Letting your family member’s PTSD dominate your life while ignoring your own needs is a surefire recipe for burnout. You need to take care of yourself in order to take care of your loved one.
Professional treatment for PTSD
Treatment for PTSD relieves symptoms by helping you deal with the trauma you’ve experienced. A doctor or therapist will encourage you to recall and process the emotions you felt during the original event in order to reduce the powerful hold the memory has on your life.
You’ll also:
Explore your thoughts and feelings about the trauma
Work through feelings of guilt and mistrust
Learn how to cope with intrusive memories
Address problems PTSD has caused in your life and relationships
Types of treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
Trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy involves gradually "exposing" yourself to feelings and situations that remind you of the trauma, and replacing distorted and irrational thoughts about the trauma with more balanced picture.
Family therapy can help your loved ones understand what you’re going through and help the family work through relationship problems.
Medication is sometimes prescribed to people with PTSD to relieve secondary symptoms of depression or anxiety, although they do not treat the causes of PTSD.
EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) incorporates elements of cognitive-behavioral therapy with eye movements or other forms of rhythmic, left-right stimulation, such as hand taps or sounds. These work by "unfreezing" the brain’s information processing system, which is interrupted in times of extreme stress.
Finding a therapist for PTSD treatment
When looking for a therapist, seek out mental health professionals who specialize in the treatment of trauma and PTSD. You can ask your doctor or other trauma survivors for a referral, call a local mental health clinic, psychiatric hospital, or counseling center, or see the Resources and References section below.
Choose a PTSD therapist who makes you feel comfortable and safe.
If a therapist doesn’t feel right, look for someone else. For therapy to work, you need to feel understood.

http://www.helpguide.org/articles/ptsd-trauma/post-traumatic-stress-disorder.htm
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At least 51 civilians have been killed in the bombardment of rebel-held areas in Syria, as the United Nations calls for a 48-hour ceasefire in order to deliver urgent aid to besieged towns.
Key points:
15 children estimated to be among 51 dead, monitoring group SOHR says
Video sent to the ABC from doctors in Aleppo shows injured civilians, dead bodies
United Nations wants 48-hour truce to get aid to eastern Aleppo
The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said 15 children were among the dead across Syria on Thursday after Government forces shelled and bombed Opposition-held neighbourhoods near Damascus, in Idlib province and in eastern Aleppo.
In graphic video sent to the ABC from doctors inside rebel-held Aleppo, badly injured adults and children are laid out in the back of a truck, as it speeds to a hospital after an airstrike.
       
The doctors, working with the Syrian American Medical Society, told the ABC they had run out of ambulances after so many medical facilities were hit recently by airstrikes.
In Geneva, the United Nations called on Syria's warring sides to observe a 48-hour truce to let aid reach eastern Aleppo and other besieged zones where civilians may be starving
#savetherest   #savethesyrianchildren   #Stopthewar   #Stopthebombs   #Dropbreadnotbombs   #Protecthumanity   #Protectthefuture   #Assadwarcrimes   #WhereistheUN   #WhereistheWorld   #ShameontheUN   #ShameontheWorld   #Breakthesilence   #SaveSyria  
 
At least 51 civilians have been killed in the bombardment of rebel-held areas in Syria, as the United Nations calls for a 48-hour ceasefire in order to deliver urgent aid to besieged towns.
Key points:
15 children estimated to be among 51 dead, monitoring group SOHR says
Video sent to the ABC from doctors in Aleppo shows injured civilians, dead bodies
United Nations wants 48-hour truce to get aid to eastern Aleppo
The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said 15 children were among the dead across Syria on Thursday after Government forces shelled and bombed Opposition-held neighbourhoods near Damascus, in Idlib province and in eastern Aleppo.
In graphic video sent to the ABC from doctors inside rebel-held Aleppo, badly injured adults and children are laid out in the back of a truck, as it speeds to a hospital after an airstrike.
       
The doctors, working with the Syrian American Medical Society, told the ABC they had run out of ambulances after so many medical facilities were hit recently by airstrikes.
In Geneva, the United Nations called on Syria's warring sides to observe a 48-hour truce to let aid reach eastern Aleppo and other besieged zones where civilians may be starving
#savetherest   #savethesyrianchildren   #Stopthewar   #Stopthebombs   #Dropbreadnotbombs   #Protecthumanity   #Protectthefuture   #Assadwarcrimes   #WhereistheUN   #WhereistheWorld   #ShameontheUN   #ShameontheWorld   #Breakthesilence   #SaveSyria  
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-22/un-calls-for-ceasefire-to-deliver-aid-to-besieged-syrian-towns/7650940
At least 51 civilians are dead after the latest shelling in Syria, as the UN calls for a 48-hour ceasefire.
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JoJo Chinook

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At least 51 civilians have been killed in the bombardment of rebel-held areas in Syria, as the United Nations calls for a 48-hour ceasefire in order to deliver urgent aid to besieged towns.
Key points:
15 children estimated to be among 51 dead, monitoring group SOHR says
Video sent to the ABC from doctors in Aleppo shows injured civilians, dead bodies
United Nations wants 48-hour truce to get aid to eastern Aleppo
The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said 15 children were among the dead across Syria on Thursday after Government forces shelled and bombed Opposition-held neighbourhoods near Damascus, in Idlib province and in eastern Aleppo.
In graphic video sent to the ABC from doctors inside rebel-held Aleppo, badly injured adults and children are laid out in the back of a truck, as it speeds to a hospital after an airstrike.
       
The doctors, working with the Syrian American Medical Society, told the ABC they had run out of ambulances after so many medical facilities were hit recently by airstrikes.
In Geneva, the United Nations called on Syria's warring sides to observe a 48-hour truce to let aid reach eastern Aleppo and other besieged zones where civilians may be starving
#savetherest   #savethesyrianchildren   #Stopthewar   #Stopthebombs   #Dropbreadnotbombs   #Protecthumanity   #Protectthefuture   #Assadwarcrimes   #WhereistheUN   #WhereistheWorld   #ShameontheUN   #ShameontheWorld   #Breakthesilence   #SaveSyria  
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-22/un-calls-for-ceasefire-to-deliver-aid-to-besieged-syrian-towns/7650940
At least 51 civilians are dead after the latest shelling in Syria, as the UN calls for a 48-hour ceasefire.
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+muhammad/محمد creamer al-iraqi It is very sad that this is still happening. I am sorry Muhammad for bringing back bad memories for you. Take care my friend. 
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JoJo Chinook
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Discussion  - 
 
 
A sad-eyed Pikachu character sits amidst the rubble on a Syrian street, while Charizard is perched alongside gun-toting jihadists.
The striking montages are the work of Syrian Khaled Akil, one of several activists and artists using the international frenzy over Pokemon Go to draw new attention to the plight of their battle-scarred country.
In the images posted on Akil's website, characters from the wildly popular smartphone app are placed into news photographs of scenes from the conflict in Syria, which is now in its sixth year and has killed more than 280,000 people.
One image appears to show the aftermath of bombardment, with facades sheared from buildings and smoke rising from the blackened carcass of a car.
A child walks across the rubble strewn throughout the street, atop which sits the yellow Pikachu character, his tall ears flopping down.
In another image, a boy wheels his bicycle down a devastated street, with the turquoise-green Vaporeon character by his side.
#savetherest   #savethesyrianchildren   #wakeupworld   #breakthesilence   #Pokemongo  
 
A sad-eyed Pikachu character sits amidst the rubble on a Syrian street, while Charizard is perched alongside gun-toting jihadists.
The striking montages are the work of Syrian Khaled Akil, one of several activists and artists using the international frenzy over Pokemon Go to draw new attention to the plight of their battle-scarred country.
In the images posted on Akil's website, characters from the wildly popular smartphone app are placed into news photographs of scenes from the conflict in Syria, which is now in its sixth year and has killed more than 280,000 people.
One image appears to show the aftermath of bombardment, with facades sheared from buildings and smoke rising from the blackened carcass of a car.
A child walks across the rubble strewn throughout the street, atop which sits the yellow Pikachu character, his tall ears flopping down.
In another image, a boy wheels his bicycle down a devastated street, with the turquoise-green Vaporeon character by his side.
#savetherest   #savethesyrianchildren   #wakeupworld   #breakthesilence   #Pokemongo  
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-22/syrians-use-pokemon-to-appeal-for-help/7654096
The characters from the Pokemon Go game are being used to draw new attention to the plight of Syrians.
3 comments on original post
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Linda Anne's profile photoJoJo Chinook's profile photoJacob Kretan's profile photoBassam Ibn Falesteen's profile photo
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Syrian children hold up photos of Pokemon hoping they will be saved +JoJo Chinook
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JoJo Chinook
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Discussion  - 
 
American doctors are risking their lives to help victims of airstrikes in one of the world's most dangerous cities, #Aleppo in #Syria.
Orthopaedic surgeon Sam Attar, critical care specialist Zaher Sahloul and paediatrician John Kahler are all doctors from Chicago.
They went to Syria to volunteer and were some of the last people to get out of Aleppo before it was cut off from the world this week, after regime forces took control of the last road leading into the city on Sunday.
"These are innocent #civilians and if the world doesn't act they will just be left to starve and be bombed to death," Dr Attar told 7.30 after returning from his most recent trip.
The road into Aleppo is one of the most dangerous journeys in the world.
"We've seen the car wrecks that are completely burnt, we've seen trucks that are turned upside down on the other side, we smelled dead bodies, looks like there's disintegrating dead bodies that are still trapped in the cars and people are not able or not daring to pull them out," Dr Sahloul, who is also the chair of the Syrian American Medical Society, told 7.30.
"It was really terrible trip and every second we were at the risk of shelling."
 
American doctors are risking their lives to help victims of airstrikes in one of the world's most dangerous cities, #Aleppo in #Syria.
Orthopaedic surgeon Sam Attar, critical care specialist Zaher Sahloul and paediatrician John Kahler are all doctors from Chicago.
They went to Syria to volunteer and were some of the last people to get out of Aleppo before it was cut off from the world this week, after regime forces took control of the last road leading into the city on Sunday.
"These are innocent #civilians and if the world doesn't act they will just be left to starve and be bombed to death," Dr Attar told 7.30 after returning from his most recent trip.
The road into Aleppo is one of the most dangerous journeys in the world.
"We've seen the car wrecks that are completely burnt, we've seen trucks that are turned upside down on the other side, we smelled dead bodies, looks like there's disintegrating dead bodies that are still trapped in the cars and people are not able or not daring to pull them out," Dr Sahloul, who is also the chair of the Syrian American Medical Society, told 7.30.
"It was really terrible trip and every second we were at the risk of shelling."

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-20/aleppo-american-doctors-risk-lives-to-help-bombing-victims/7644982
American doctors are risking their lives to help victims of airstrikes in Aleppo, Syria.
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Trauma
A trauma reaction is a common response to an abnormal event where a person experiences fear, horror or helplessness due to witnessing or being the target of actual or threatened death or injury.
Every person will have an individual trauma response based on the type and severity of the experience, their age, gender, resilience and other psychosocial factors. Trauma can disrupt a person’s health and everyday living.
Trauma affects individuals on the biological, psychological and social levels. Some of these impacts include:
Changes in brain structure, function and physiology; Hyper-arousal
Injuries, illnesses, chronic pain, psychosomatic issues
Anxiety, sadness, fear, anger, irritability, guilt, shame
Intrusive thoughts, flashbacks, nightmares, trouble sleeping, memory and concentration problems
Post-traumatic symptoms including PTSD
Changed sense of self, beliefs, loss of trust, disempowerment, loss of self-esteem
Difficulties with personal relationships; social withdrawal
Trauma not only impacts on individuals; it also impacts on families, social support networks, refugee communities, and Australian society and institutions.

http://www.startts.org.au/resources/refugees-asylum-seekers-and-trauma/learn-about-torture-and-trauma/
Thank you for supporting our work. Every donation, whether large or small, helps us in our work of providing services and support to people who have survived terrible and traumatic experiences. Your donation will help us to provide more comprehensive services to the people that need them most, ...
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The Experiences of Refugee Children and Young People
Children and young people are not spared from the human rights abuses that force people to become refugees. They may experience these ordeals as part of a family or on their own, when they are separated from their parents.
Some of the common experiences of refugee children and young people are:
Separation from family and friends, including one or both parents
War and violence, including rape, bombings and forced military service
Dangerous journeys with limited supplies
Death or disappearance of loved ones such as fathers and brothers
Refugee camps which are violent, overcrowded, lack safe drinking water and sanitation and have little opportunities for education
Hunger and starvation
Disease
Adjusting to an unfamiliar environment and culture
How Refugee Experiences Affect Children and Young People
Although refugee children generally seem amazingly resilient, their experiences can also make them vulnerable and may result in difficulties adjusting to Australian society and leading a ‘normal’ life. Despite this, with a bit of support they can learn to adapt to their new environment and enjoy life again.
Some problems they may face include:
Sleep difficulties and nightmares
Inability to concentrate and learn
Fear and anxiety
Depression
Becoming withdrawn and quiet
Becoming overly aggressive
Withdrawing from play and other social activities
Missing family and friends
Acting out
Truancy
Drug and alcohol abuse
For younger children, excessive crying, screaming, trembling and clinging
Taking on more adult roles in the family
Parents who are unable to care for them properly
Fitting in and making friends at school
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JoJo Chinook
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At least 51 civilians have been killed in the bombardment of rebel-held areas in Syria, as the United Nations calls for a 48-hour ceasefire in order to deliver urgent aid to besieged towns.
Key points:
15 children estimated to be among 51 dead, monitoring group SOHR says
Video sent to the ABC from doctors in Aleppo shows injured civilians, dead bodies
United Nations wants 48-hour truce to get aid to eastern Aleppo
The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said 15 children were among the dead across Syria on Thursday after Government forces shelled and bombed Opposition-held neighbourhoods near Damascus, in Idlib province and in eastern Aleppo.
In graphic video sent to the ABC from doctors inside rebel-held Aleppo, badly injured adults and children are laid out in the back of a truck, as it speeds to a hospital after an airstrike.
       
The doctors, working with the Syrian American Medical Society, told the ABC they had run out of ambulances after so many medical facilities were hit recently by airstrikes.
In Geneva, the United Nations called on Syria's warring sides to observe a 48-hour truce to let aid reach eastern Aleppo and other besieged zones where civilians may be starving
#savetherest   #savethesyrianchildren   #Stopthewar   #Stopthebombs   #Dropbreadnotbombs   #Protecthumanity   #Protectthefuture   #Assadwarcrimes   #WhereistheUN   #WhereistheWorld   #ShameontheUN   #ShameontheWorld   #Breakthesilence   #SaveSyria  
 
At least 51 civilians have been killed in the bombardment of rebel-held areas in Syria, as the United Nations calls for a 48-hour ceasefire in order to deliver urgent aid to besieged towns.
Key points:
15 children estimated to be among 51 dead, monitoring group SOHR says
Video sent to the ABC from doctors in Aleppo shows injured civilians, dead bodies
United Nations wants 48-hour truce to get aid to eastern Aleppo
The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said 15 children were among the dead across Syria on Thursday after Government forces shelled and bombed Opposition-held neighbourhoods near Damascus, in Idlib province and in eastern Aleppo.
In graphic video sent to the ABC from doctors inside rebel-held Aleppo, badly injured adults and children are laid out in the back of a truck, as it speeds to a hospital after an airstrike.
       
The doctors, working with the Syrian American Medical Society, told the ABC they had run out of ambulances after so many medical facilities were hit recently by airstrikes.
In Geneva, the United Nations called on Syria's warring sides to observe a 48-hour truce to let aid reach eastern Aleppo and other besieged zones where civilians may be starving
#savetherest   #savethesyrianchildren   #Stopthewar   #Stopthebombs   #Dropbreadnotbombs   #Protecthumanity   #Protectthefuture   #Assadwarcrimes   #WhereistheUN   #WhereistheWorld   #ShameontheUN   #ShameontheWorld   #Breakthesilence   #SaveSyria  
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-22/un-calls-for-ceasefire-to-deliver-aid-to-besieged-syrian-towns/7650940
At least 51 civilians are dead after the latest shelling in Syria, as the UN calls for a 48-hour ceasefire.
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JoJo Chinook

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Six wealthiest countries host less than 9% of world’s refugees http://humanpains.com/2016/07/21/six-wealthiest-countries-host-less-than-9-of-worlds-refugees …
US, China, Japan, Germany, France and UK accommodate just 2.1 million refugees, according to Oxfam report By Kate Lyons Sunday 17 July 2016 The six wealthiest countries in the world, which between …
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