Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Russell Downham
22 followers
22 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
So again, the topic I'm writing about seems to set the tone for my experience of writing it. This one -- finally finished -- is about Work: more specifically, the rather glum finding of the new 'Mappiness' research that seems to show that work is the least enjoyable activity we regularly do. But as I try to show here, even if work is our least enjoyable activity, it may nonetheless contribute deeply to our enjoyment of life -- quite apart from its monetary rewards.

This article felt like work, but I'm now experiencing the reward in a positive feeling of satisfaction. Maybe next time I'll try writing about effortless flow and see if that's easier.

Anyway, I hope you enjoy.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Perhaps ironically, I spent ages thinking about how to write this article about over-thinking decisions. If you too have this tendency, I hope you find some ideas here on how to moderate this tendency.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Here's a real example of integrity in the medical profession -- it's worth reading, especially if you're interested in heart disease (and not experiencing it).

It's hard to find good information on heart disease, partly because statin drugs are such a huge industry, and partly because a lot of what we think we know is not informed by up-to-date biochemical research. I'm no expert myself, but I know enough to be suspicious of the standard view of cholesterol that circulates so persistently despite evidence suggesting a more complex reality.

Anyway, it's refreshing to see a senior heart surgeon speak out about his own mistakes and what he's learned. Hats off to you, Dr. Dwight Lundell.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Would we happier if we experienced life's meaningfulness more like dogs experience it? That's one question raised in this new article I published on Questions for Creative Living yesterday. I hope it stimulates interesting reflections in you.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Many people now choose to eat a ketogenic diet, replacing carbohydrates with fats (!). This diet, though counter-intuitive, is recommended by a large body of biochemical research, and a growing number of people swear by it. Nothing works for everyone, since everyone is different, but I'm enjoying very steady energy levels since I started eating this way, and so are my friends who are doing it. If it works for you, or you'd like to learn how you could enjoy trying it, check out this blog, For the Love of Lipids ('Lipids' is the polite word for fats). The author details her own exploration of the science behind this approach to eating, providing references to support the evidence base and including suggestions for further reading, but it's the amazing meal ideas that really make this site unique. Eat it!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Here's a short, practical article I published today on my blog, Questions for Creative Living. For some reason I struggled with this piece, so as I was writing about the value of perseverance, I found myself using my own reasoning to make myself finish the article. It worked, hooray!

If you're struggling with a difficult project, I hope it works for you too. Let me know how it goes. Cheers -- Russell
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Hello World! After years spent largely ignoring social media, finally I'm joining in. What draws me here is the promise of connecting with new people and sharing in conversations about living, reflecting, valuing, choosing, creating, playing, learning, communicating, and how to do all of these things with more awareness, informed by science, philosophy, and the diversity of human experience. When I find something worth sharing, I will.

To begin, here's one thing I've learned lately that affects everyone who looks at a screen at night -- most of us, right? The problem with looking at screens at night is that they emit a lot of light in the blue light spectrum that tells your brain to wake up. Research shows that two hours of staring at that light can delay sleep onset by an hour. To prevent this, you have two options. First, you can wear these amber glasses that filter out all the blue light. I bought some of those for 10 bucks and I almost never wear them. A second solution, at least for computer use, is to install some free software that automatically keeps track of when it's evening in your timezone and then filters out the blue light from your screen. I use f.lux -- learn more at http://justgetflux.com
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded