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Patrick Bowen
Works at Michigan Technological University
Attends Michigan Technological University
Lives in Houghton, MI
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Patrick Bowen

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A position as an electron microscopist for L'Oréal sounds like a lot of fun, don't you think?
RECRUITMENT ;PROFILEResearch Scientist, international experience. ; ; ; ; ;Experience in electron...
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Patrick Bowen

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Our new paper in Materials Science and Engineering C: "A new in vitro–in vivo correlation for bioabsorbable magnesium stents from mechanical behavior"

Free-to-read preprint: http://goo.gl/42eFkN
On the MSE-C website: http://goo.gl/JgEWXI
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Patrick Bowen

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Contratulations to Dr. Stephen Mashl (Michigan Tech, Department of Materials Science and Engineering), who was recently named an ASM Fellow!

From Tech Today (http://goo.gl/79Qlq): 
"Stephen Mashl, a research professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Michigan Technological University, has been named a Fellow of ASM International...

"Mashl joined the Michigan Tech faculty in 2011 and is developing an applied research program in particulate materials and powder metallurgy. He holds BS, MS and PhD degrees in Metallurgical Engineering from the University and has spent most of his career in industry, most recently as global director of research and development for the UK-based firm Bodycote, where he helped establish Bodycote as a technical leader within the global HIP industry."
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Patrick Bowen

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Well said!

"Misinforming the public to popularize science does not popularize science; it hurts science. The science out there is already so amazing, we don't need to make it something it's not. I understand that it's not easy for everyone to always read the original paper and understand it, let alone convey the findings in a manner that the public can understand, but sensationalizing it to make people take notice is disingenuous and lazy at best, and harmful and detrimental to our collective goals of science outreach at worst."
 
Science is already Sensational

Two years ago, I signed up to G+ and was thrilled to discover so many scientists and science advocates on here - I found my kind! From those early days, we built a community, from the ground up, made of people who were passionate about communicating science and battling anti-science. Over time, we gained enthusiastic support from the public, and our followers on G+ grew, along with the engagement we received from the content we produced. Fascinating topics, insightful discussions, the occasional swatting of the pseudoscience troll, these were all things that brought us closer together. Pages and Communities sprang up, all with the common goal of science outreach and public education and I am so proud and happy to be a part of that. To that end, +ScienceSunday and +Science on Google+: A Public Database are excellent resources for any newcomers.

As a scientist, communicating science comes with a responsibility to be honest. When I write a science post, I do it because I read a paper that made me go "wow, that is so cool! I want to share that with people!". My goal is not to hit What's Hot, or to get more followers, or to become popular, or to increase a Klout score or whatever. I don't care about those things because they are side effects.

Because of this, I don't sensationalize my posts to become popular. I strongly feel that the science I write about is already pretty damn sensational. I don't need to lie to you, the public, to make you excited about it, because I hope that my science writing skills can translate the jargon from the research so that you are excited about the science itself

Sensationalizing scientific discoveries is patronizing. It implies that you, the public, is too stupid to understand or care about the science, and I need to deliver it in a form that you will consume easier. This is lazy, and ultimately doesn't really educate anyone about the scientific discovery; it just spreads misinformation. 

Sensationalizing science also leads the public to have false expectations about the science. A sensationalized title such as "Scientists Have Grown a Fully Functional Liver from stem cells" might hit What's Hot, but is an outright lie. It leads the public to expect 'fully functional livers' to be made available to transplant candidates within months and years, whereas the reality is far from the case. This is not the fault of the science, or the scientist. 

Misinforming the public to popularize science does not popularize science; it hurts science. The science out there is already so amazing, we don't need to make it something it's not. I understand that it's not easy for everyone to always read the original paper and understand it, let alone convey the findings in a manner that the public can understand, but sensationalizing it to make people take notice is disingenuous and lazy at best, and harmful and detrimental to our collective goals of science outreach at worst.

If you have me circled, I won't lie to you. I will do my best to share the research that I think is exciting, in a jargon-free manner that I hope you can understand, and be available to answer any questions you might have about it, or find other scientists who could answer you. You can expect to read about things like radioactive bacteria shrinking tumors (http://goo.gl/FhPeM), the evolution of snake venom proteins (http://goo.gl/qZHcF) or how a compound in breast milk could be used to treat MRSA (http://goo.gl/RQGv5) if I am in your circles. I am here to communicate science and to make you as excited about it as I am. I don't need to sensationalize something that is already sensational.

Thanks +Tommy Leung, +Rajini Rao, +Hedwig Pöllöläinen and +Brian Koberlein for inspiring this post. It's something that was on my mind for quite a while, and you guys were awesome catalysts :)

PS: Yes I'm not wearing a labcoat...shh!

#ScienceSunday   
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Patrick Bowen

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This is truly a hidden gem!  It is quite possibly the most succinct, witty title and abstract out there.  

From the communication "Can apparent superluminal neutrino speeds be explained as a quantum weak measurement?" by MV Berry et al. (J Phys A: Math Theor, vol. 44, 2011).

http://io9.com/this-may-be-the-best-scientific-paper-abstract-ever-wri-729221070
The title of the paper: "Can apparent superluminal neutrino speeds be explained as a quantum weak measurement?" The abstract? See for yourself:
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Patrick Bowen

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Short, interesting article in this month's JOM: "Rare-Earth Economics: The Balance Problem." See: http://goo.gl/8TxML

The article discusses supply/demand differences between different light and heavy rare earth elements and opportunities to leverage relatively cheap REs and avoid more expensive varieties.
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Patrick Bowen

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Very interesting guest post on Retraction Watch in which Prof. Vaux discusses some dubious results in the journal Nature and the course of action that he took to set the record straight.
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Patrick Bowen

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Great TED-like format.  Would love to see this at Michigan Tech!
 
Did you miss the livestream of Monday’s Science at the Theater? Watch it here and learn about some of the biggest ideas in #cancer , #cosmology , #energy , #materials etc. Also, let us know your thoughts on the format (several scientists, 8 minutes each, plenty of time for Q&A) and feel free to suggest topics for future events. Thanks!
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Patrick Bowen

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WTFingF. "Scientific discovery is not valuable unless it has commercial value," John McDougall, president of the NRC.  SO. WRONG.
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Patrick Bowen

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a GIF that took almost 4 billion years to build.
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Story
Tagline
A grad student at Michigan Tech, working in bioabsorbable materials science.
Education
  • Michigan Technological University
    Ph. D., Materials Science and Engineering, 2011 - present
  • Michigan Technological University
    B. S., Materials Science and Engineering, 2008 - 2011
  • Muskegon Community College
    2007 - 2008
  • Whitehall High School
    2003 - 2007
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
Pat, P. K.
Work
Occupation
Graduate Research Assistant
Employment
  • Michigan Technological University
    Graduate Research Assistant, 2011 - present
  • Michigan Technological University
    Engineernig Fundamentals T. A., 2009 - 2011
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Houghton, MI
Previously
Whitehall, MI
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