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Patrick Bowen
Works at Michigan Technological University
Attends Michigan Technological University
Lives in Houghton, MI
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Patrick Bowen

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Wine.com "last of the lot" event today with free shipping on any order.  I was able to score a mixed case for <$100, and the six wines that I know I'm getting get good +CellarTracker scores.  They also have a "mystery 6-pack" deal going on if you're feeling adventurous (my fingers are crossed...).
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Patrick Bowen

Science Bytes (Memes, Cartoons, Images)  - 
 
Imaging some zinc that had been soaked in a phosphate buffered saline-based solution last week, I ran across lots of little zinc phosphate crystals.  Two really stood out, and are shaped almost exactly like arrowheads.  Far out!

The instrument used was Michigan Tech’s Hitachi S-4700 FE-SEM.  Both of these images were captured in “low magnification” mode because the salt crystals are so large.  They measure a little less than 0.1 mm in length, and so they are a little smaller than you can see with the naked eye.
Imaging some zinc that had been soaked in a phosphate buffered saline-based solution last week, I ran across lots of little zinc phosphate crystals.  Two really stood out, and are shaped almost exactly like arrowheads.  Far o...
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+Patrick Bowen That is far out! Why were they soaked in "a phosphate buffered saline-based solution"?
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Patrick Bowen

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A position as an electron microscopist for L'Oréal sounds like a lot of fun, don't you think?
RECRUITMENT ;PROFILEResearch Scientist, international experience. ; ; ; ; ;Experience in electron...
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"The most advanced absorbable stents available today are made from polylactic acid (PLLA). Based on nearly five years of clinical trial data, for example, Abbott Vascular’s bioresorbable Absorb scaffold compares favorably to the company’s metal-based XIENCE stent, the current industry standard for nonabsorbable drug-eluting stents.

"But what about absorbable metal stents? Based on magnesium, current state-of-the-art absorbable metal stents could eventually give bioresorbable polymeric stents a run for their money because they are thinner, less prone to inflammation, easier to implant, free from the risk of thrombosis, and more. 

"Seeking an alternative to magnesium-based stents, researchers at Michigan Technological University (Houghton) are conducting studies on a stent design made from zinc. This material, the scientists say, offers better degradation rates than magnesium and can be processed in such a way as to increase its mechanical properties. In the following conversation, Jaroslaw Drelich, professor in the department of materials science engineering, and Patrick Bowen, PhD candidate in materials science and engineering, share their insights into zinc as a potential candidate for next-generation absorbable stents..."
Qmed (formerly Medical Device Link) is the world's first completely prequalified supplier directory and news source for medical device OEMs. Find medical device suppliers and IVD suppliers who are FDA-registered, ISO 13485- and ISO 9001-certified. Qmed is also the home of Medical Product Manufacturing News and the most relevant breaking news for the medical device industry.
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Patrick Bowen

Science News (Pop Sci)  - 
 
Way to go Prof. Pearce, Jerry, and team! A metal 3D printer using MIG and a common Reprap platform developed at Michigan Tech's Department of Materials Science and Engineering was named one of the Top 10 new open source hardware projects of 2013 by Open Electronics.

From the article: "This amazing project presented earlier in December just got huge coverage worldwide this year. Having a cheap metal 3d Printer is a true dream for most of the maker community and could have a huge impact on the potential for small companies – as well as developing world communities – to accelerate their potential to create technology innovations."

Read the full paper here: https://www.academia.edu/5327317/A_Low-Cost_Open-Source_Metal_3-D_Printer
This post celebrates few of the most incredible Open Source Hardware project from 2013. Most of these projects were crowdfunded, and I believe this tells much about how innovations is funded and encouraged these days. 2013 was a year full of open innovations and 2014 looks largely promising as both huge companies and independent developers and startups increasingly look at this approach to innovation. Stay on top of the news by following @OpenEle...
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Great write-up! Thanks, Patrick!
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Patrick Bowen

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Our new paper in Materials Science and Engineering C: "A new in vitro–in vivo correlation for bioabsorbable magnesium stents from mechanical behavior"

Free-to-read preprint: http://goo.gl/42eFkN
On the MSE-C website: http://goo.gl/JgEWXI
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Patrick Bowen

Discussion  - 
 
If you happen on a wine that is old enough to have a lead capsule, and the wine has been exposed to the capsule for some time, is it still drinkable?
An intriguing question on Reddit from /u/wolframite was right up my alley.  It went something like this: What is the likelihood that my wine is contaminated with lead (Pb)? I discovered a 1973 magnum of a Californian wine o...
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In the last couple of instances I heard about where wine was exposed to the lead capsule, the wine was still surprisingly drinkable, hence the dichotomy.  Very counterintuitive, but apparently it happens.
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Patrick Bowen

Science Policy & Practice  - 
 
+ResearchGate is introducing an "open review" feature that allows users to comment on published studies and characterize them as "reproducible" or "non-reproducible," among other things. This is a really great tool for disseminating post-publication validation studies.

Could there be opportunity for abuse of this systems? Will it be an issue for novice ResearchGate users, who might tend to clutter the "reviews" area with unrelated questions and criticisms?

Read more: http://goo.gl/CMzg9y
ResearchGate is a network dedicated to science and research. Connect, collaborate and discover scientific publications, jobs and conferences. All for free.
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"Could there be opportunity for abuse of this...?"
Yes, of course. Suppose you and I are competing in some area of research, and you publish first in this forum. I (or the organization for whom I perform research) buy or rent some bots or people to click-storm downvote your paper. Are your results reproducible? Maybe. Do they look reproducible? Not when I'm finished with them; quantity of response has trumped quality of response. Vetting matters; science shouldn't be a popularity contest.

"Will [clutter] be an issue?
It seems likely that it will. +Rajini Rao's "social media-fication" is a good point: we need look no further than existing social media clutter for a model of signal-to-noise ratios. Aggressive moderation can help but is resource intensive and raises questions about transparency, internal bias, etc. It also makes the new structure seem much like existing private publication journals.

From the linked "Letter From the Founder of ResearchGate": "Recently it was proven that a study published in a reputable journal could not be reproduced, after it had already made headlines across the world." First, I don't see the "open review" process solving this problem. The journal in question had either incomplete or inaccurate information at the time of publication. ResearchGate doesn't address how they will prevent that. Second, popular media crawls through journals looking for stories they can hype, not reliable research information and dry statistics. Their goal is to sell advertising by drawing in readers or viewers with splashy headlines and brief, breathless, content-free pieces. Once interesting new research lands in ResearchGate, the press will grab it and spin for popular response. Again, I don't see how the new model intends to prevent that from happening.

I find myself with more questions than answers, and, anecdotally, I find founder Ijad Madisch's desire for "...ResearchGate to win the Nobel Prize” pathetically self-serving and terribly uninformed, particularly since "Madisch doesn’t know which category the Nobel Prize would be for. But he figures if he can dramatically increase collaboration among scientists and speed up scientific breakthroughs as a result, that would be worth some kind of big prize." (http://www.forbes.com/sites/kerryadolan/2012/07/19/how-ijad-madisch-aims-to-disrupt-science-research-with-a-social-network/). That rather undermines the altruism suggested in the founder's letter: "Peer review isn’t working. Today I invite you to change this. Science must be open." Maybe by "science" he meant "wallets"?
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Interesting research published by researchers from the Max Planck institute for iron/steel research (Eisenforschung) in +Advanced Materials  on "smart" corrosion-inhibiting coatings on zinc. The full article: http://goo.gl/nADZCA

Wonder if these could be used for biomedical application to produce polymer coatings with the ability to both elute drugs and prevent localized corrosion? Could be useful in engineering bioabsorbable zinc stents with tailored surface properties ( http://goo.gl/WFttcz )?

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Abstract: "Raspberry-shaped redox-responsive capsules for storing corrosion inhibitors are introduced, targeted to solve the drawbacks of conducting-polymer-based coating systems for corrosion protection. These capsules synthesized via the miniemulsion technique have a remarkable release property upon reduction (onset of corrosion) and cease release upon reoxidation (passivation of the defect). The self-healing capability is demonstrated by application of these capsules as part of a composite coating on zinc."
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Patrick Bowen

Science News (Pop Sci)  - 
 
Our most recent paper debuted in Acta Biomaterialia last week, titled "Magnesium in the murine artery: Probing the products of corrosion." It's all about characterizing the degradation products that occur on magnesium in the artery, and what it means for bioabsorbable stents.

DOI/journal website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2013.11.021

Free-to-read (slightly ugly) preprint: http://www.scribd.com/doc/190306836/Magnesium-in-the-murine-artery-Probing-the-products-of-corrosion-Bowen-et-al-Acta-Biomaterialia-2013

Abstract: "Many publications are available on the physiological and pseudophysiological corrosion of magnesium and its alloys for bioabsorbable implant application, yet few focus on characterization of explanted materials. In this work, commercially pure magnesium wires were corroded in the arteries of rats for up to one month, removed, and both bulk and surface products were characterized. Surface characterization using infrared spectroscopy revealed a duplex structure comprising heavily magnesium-substituted hydroxyapatite that later transformed into an A-type (carbonate-substituted) hydroxyapatite. To explain this transformation, an ion-exchange mechanism is suggested. Elemental mapping of the bulk products of biocorrosion revealed the elemental distribution of Ca, P, Mg, and O in the outer and Mg, O, and P in inner layers. Carbon was not observed in any significant quantity from the inner corrosion layer, suggesting that carbonates are not a prevalent product of corrosion. Backscatter electron imaging of cross sections showed that thinning or absence of the hydroxyapatite in the later stages of degradation is related to local thickening of the inner corrosion layer. Based on these experimental observations, mechanisms describing corrosion in the quasi-steady state and during terminal breakdown of the magnesium specimens are proposed."
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This is truly a hidden gem!  It is quite possibly the most succinct, witty title and abstract out there.  

From the communication "Can apparent superluminal neutrino speeds be explained as a quantum weak measurement?" by MV Berry et al. (J Phys A: Math Theor, vol. 44, 2011).

http://io9.com/this-may-be-the-best-scientific-paper-abstract-ever-wri-729221070
The title of the paper: "Can apparent superluminal neutrino speeds be explained as a quantum weak measurement?" The abstract? See for yourself:
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Work
Occupation
Graduate Research Assistant
Employment
  • Michigan Technological University
    Graduate Research Assistant, 2011 - present
  • Michigan Technological University
    Engineernig Fundamentals T. A., 2009 - 2011
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Houghton, MI
Previously
Whitehall, MI
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A grad student at Michigan Tech, working in bioabsorbable materials science.
Education
  • Michigan Technological University
    Ph. D., Materials Science and Engineering, 2011 - present
  • Michigan Technological University
    B. S., Materials Science and Engineering, 2008 - 2011
  • Muskegon Community College
    2007 - 2008
  • Whitehall High School
    2003 - 2007
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Male
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Pat, P. K.