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LDS Church History
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The history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

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When entire congregations in South Africa expressed interest in joining the Church, language was a barrier. Judy Brummer's fluency in the Xhosa language paved the way for hundreds to be baptized.

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“Soon we are where the Saints had their Winter Quarters when they were driven from civilization. Here were relics of different natures; a house that Brigham Young had lived in, a well that Heber C. Kimball had dug and the remains of dugouts, camping places and other sacred memories of gone-by time.”

John Lingren, age 18, Swedish convert, spring 1863, Winter Quarters, Nebraska

To read more of the pioneer’s words as they crossed the plains to Utah, click here:

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"God calls us in our weakness, but He qualifies us for His work." —Joseph Smith http://bit.ly/2nyuWMD

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In a February 18, 1869, address to the Salt Lake City Seventeenth Ward Relief Society, Eliza R. Snow spoke on the principle of faith. “When you see one step before you, take it, and do not wait to see where is the next—if we see one step, it is not for us to stand still until we can see the way clear in the distance, but move forward and the way will be opened before us, step by step. This is a principle. God requires us to make the effort and thus prove our faith and trust in him.”

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“We left the Mississippi about noon. We ascended the bluffs. Here we halted, and took a farewell view of our delightful city, that we had seen and helped to rear from its infancy. We also beheld the magnificent temple, rearing its lofty tower towards the heavens, which speaks volumes in honor of the wisdom and greatness of our martyred prophet. . . . We also took a farewell look at our homes. Whilst looking and pondering upon all this, I felt grateful to my heavenly father . . . and asked His protecting care over us on our journey. Yea, my heart swelled within me, because of the things which I beheld.”

Newel Knight, age 45, April 1846, Montrose, Iowa

To read more of the pioneer’s words as they crossed the plains to Utah, click here:

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Eliza R. Snow was a poet, a world traveler, and a renowned leader of Latter-day Saint women. She effectively linked the Nauvoo Relief Society to the resurgence of the organization in Utah Territory by preserving the Nauvoo Relief Society Minute Book and traveling throughout Mormon settlements to help organize women and encourage them to speak. Read one of her discourses: http://bit.ly/2lzzwEZ
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A Church member described Joseph Smith’s manner of praying as having “no ostentation, no raising of the voice as by enthusiasm, but a plain conversational tone, as a man would address a present friend.” The member also noted, “Never until then had I heard a man address his Maker as though He was present listening as a kind father would listen to the sorrows of a dutiful child.”

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“And the Lord opened the heavens upon me and I saw the Lord. And he spake unto me, saying, ‘Joseph, my son, thy sins are forgiven thee.’” —Joseph Smith, circa summer 1832

Artwork: Joseph Smith’s First Vision by Janus Mostyl, Poland, 1999
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Locust Creek, Iowa

“Continued to rain all day very heavy. The camp is very disagreeable and muddy. . . . In the evening . . . the band met in the tent and played on the violins. All the time we were playing, the lightning occasionally broke forth from the N. W. [Northwest]. At 8 o’clock we dispersed just as the storm approached. . . . The rain beat through the wagon covers & drenched families and effects. It was the most severe storm we have experienced and with such weather it seems impossible to preserve our little clothing & provisions from being spoiled. But in the midst of all the camp all are cheerful and happy and there are but few sick. . . . This morning Ellen Kimball came to me & wished me much joy. She said Diantha [Clayton’s wife] has got a son. . . . This morning I composed a new song, 'All is Well’ ['Come, Come, Ye Saints']. I feel to thank my heavenly father for my boy and pray that he will spare and preserve his life and that of his mother. . . . O Lord bless thine handmaid and fill her with thy Spirit. Make her healthy that her life may be prolonged and that we may live long upon the earth to honor the cause of truth.”

William Clayton, Age 31, English convert, April 6 and 15, 1846. Trail journal.

To read more of the pioneers’ words as they crossed the plains to Utah, click here: http://bit.ly/2lTJk15
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Drusilla Hendricks was an early proponent of the Relief Society. She reminisced that before the Relief Society was organized in Nauvoo, she dreamed that women were holding meetings and keeping records of their work. Hendricks joined the Nauvoo Relief Society on April 14, 1842, and was appointed to a visiting committee in the Second Ward in Nauvoo. Read some of her teachings to the sisters in At the Pulpit: 185 Years of Discourses by Latter-day Saint Women, which is now available. http://bit.ly/2lMGOrI
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