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Michael S. Seaver
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Michael S. Seaver

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Happy Earth Day. Here are some tips for a 'greener' life.
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Michael S. Seaver

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Great information
 
How To Track Social Media Traffic With Google Analytics - awesome post by my friends at +Social Media Examiner. Great tutorial here.
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Michael S. Seaver

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Did you get one? What do you think?
 
Starting to wonder if this whole hype of tablets being the next generation of computers is true?
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Michael S. Seaver

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Sounds like an informative hang out.
 
Next Hangout On Air: Get Social
Posted by +Toby Stein and +Vanessa Schneider:

On Wednesday at 11am PST, we'll be sitting down with a group of all-star Google Community Managers - +Sarah Price, +Brian Rose, and +Jacky Hayward - to talk about why your business should have a social presence online. We'll be talking about building loyalty and community around your brand, sharing content on all sorts of platforms, striking the right tone, and more.

But, we want to hear directly from you! What are the biggest challenges yo face in getting your business to be social? Post questions you want our panel to tackle and join us on Wednesday to learn something new!
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Michael S. Seaver

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Billy Rios, featured in +Ars Technica, has one of the "coolest jobs in tech"—hacking for good. Billy works on our Web or Other Product Security (a.k.a. WOOPS) team, where he channels expertise from his early hacker days to make Google products more secure. Billy's team analyzes reports of bugs in our products/services to find potential security vulnerabilities. When they find one, they often exploit the flaw in a safe manner to figure out how severe it is before repairing it or working with another engineering team to do so.
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Michael S. Seaver

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Are employers crossing the line?
 
I heard about this story a couple of days ago, though I'm aware that the practice has been going on for a while now. Personally, I think this is going "below and beyond." Antiquated it may be, but I prefer the old way of vetting candidates by getting background checks over what the article describes as "akin to requiring someone's house keys." Would it be right for me, as a potential employee, to ask my potential bosses for access to THEIR social network accounts for things that I could use to what amounts as blackmail or extortion?

There's a reason that people maintain different circles. No matter how much we insist that we act the same way around everyone, we vary our behavior depending on who we're with. I don't talk heavily about gaming, for example, with friends and family who I know are not interested in the subject. Likewise, I don't describe the gory details of a pub crawl to my coworkers (unless they are actually friends).

Why should I want to work for a company who tries to vet me for discretion when they cannot be discreet themselves? What other things will they push for me to do when they are unable to recognize what should be mine and what should be theirs? If they're so concerned about disparaging comments from their employees, then shouldn't they stop doing anything that would warrant those comments?

Yes, it's a bad economy and we need to survive so we take what we can get. I understand that. Still, these companies are getting away with behavior that a private citizen would get sued or jailed for if they were to do the same. Just because there are plenty of pages on the internet that are publicly accessible doesn't mean that I can't have my own space(s) where I can feel free to rant about my job, my school, my friends or my family as I need to. Companies should be well aware of being able to privatize a small section of the web just for themselves that only some people are privileged enough to see. You, being my potential employer, does not entitle you to my personal Facebook page. Heck, you're not even entitled to become a Facebook friend even if you were my employer.

I know this is a public post. If this will cost me future employment, then so be it. I'm pretty positive that I wouldn't want to work for you anyway.
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Maybe...But then I wonder if the people that object to it the most, are worried about what the prospective employer will find?
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