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247detectives
24/7 Detectives offer a wide range of specialist, discreet services, from Tracing people, Vehicles and transactions, to monitoring your property, loved ones and employees. We are determined to offer you peace of mind while guaranteeing a professional, tailor made service.
24/7 Detectives offer a wide range of specialist, discreet services, from Tracing people, Vehicles and transactions, to monitoring your property, loved ones and employees. We are determined to offer you peace of mind while guaranteeing a professional, tailor made service.
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Hello everybody, I am looking for an Investigator that is able to perform Sweeping Bugging/Debugging equipment and services in Lahore, is anybody able to assist with this? thanks and be well.

Please email me at Josef@247Detectives.com if you are able to assist or recommend, thanks, alternatively I am available on 0844 247 0007 / 07014 234 247

#Investigator #Sweeping #Debugging #Countersurveillance #Lahore

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Hello, We are a relatively new community and we invite you to join, share and introduce yourself to your National and International counter-parts, I would like to make this a place for agents to communicate and and exchange tips and advice!
+Private Investigators Spain +Private Investigators UK +Private Investigator +Private Investigator +Private Investigators Plymouth +Private Investigator Kenya +Private Investigator Training UK +Private Investigator Marketing +Private Investigator and Detective Agency in Singapore +Process Server Los Angeles

Encrypting malware: a new war
Imagine if Amazon was hacked. Someone initiated a payment on the system but instead of providing payment information, they send the system malware, encrypted to avoid detection. Say Amazon hadn't been expecting this kind of hack and so, doesn't inspect incoming encrypted information. This malware then begins to send information back but it still has not been detected. The next day, someone somewhere would have millions and millions of legitimate credit cards and personal information about the cardholders. Purchases could be made across the globe before anyone ever realised that their information was taken from the Amazon site.
This is now a very real threat companies are facing: the use of encryption technology to disguise malware, facilitating attacks. Hackers are getting smarter. Yahoo's compromised server was likely hit with malware disguised with encryption. Yahoo has 500 million users worldwide, and thus the magnitude of the hack was immense and very concerning given the amount of information we keep on email these days.
Why encrypt traffic?
Roughly one-third of all internet traffic is encrypted. Encryption is used for everything including Skype, messaging applications, email accounts and companies like Netflix. Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn all use SSL but have been targeted previously and have inadvertently leaked data as a result.
Sites like Wired.com have this month encrypted all traffic going to and from their servers. This means that no one wishing to sabotage the site can modify the content on it or lift any information customers input on their site, such as email addresses.
The necessity for encrypting all confidential information was laid bare with successful high-profile hacks like that performed on Ashley Madison and LinkedIn this year. Whole databases of customers and their log in information was released to the public. It would seem the companies themselves were not using ciphers to store information or if they were, they were somewhat simple.
According to a new report by A10 Networks and Ponemon Institute, hackers are increasingly using encryption to hide malware, enabling it to sneak undetected into systems. In some cases, it has been found hidden in the system for up to five years! It is ironic that the software that was built to secure confidential personal data is being used to disguise malware attacks.
They also found that 75% of survey respondents reported they were completely unprepared to detect this encrypted malware. Companies should be looking at decrypting and inspecting all traffic cloaked in SSL.
Detection has one drawback, however; it slows network performance.
It is thought around 50% of all cyber attacks are perpetrated with the use of SSL encryption technology.
So what are the best types of encryption technology available?
• Blowfish/Twofish: Blowfish jumbles messages up and codes them. Blowfish and its successor Twofish are free services and regarded as among the best in the market.
• Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) cryptography: SSL is one of the most commonly used forms of encryption technology, protecting data en route from server to web browsers such as payment information on sites like Amazon.
• HTTPS: This is the standard HTTP protocol with an extra layer of encryption on top. Google and Facebook both now use HTTPS protocol. This protocol is based on new technology that has largely superseded SSL, called Transport Layer Security. A large number of sites now use this technology to encrypt, at the very least, their login page.
• Advanced Encryption Standard (AES): AES is the encryption service used by the US Government, as well as a number of organisations worldwide. AES uses large keys of between 192 and 256 bits for heavy duty encryption purposes. A 256 bit cypher would be difficult to decode, except for one attacking it with brute force.
What can you do right now to avert such an attack? Firstly, if you are storing customer information, use a cipher to protect those details from sabotage. Therefore, if a hacker did gain access, it would make it a little more difficult for them to get information. Secondly, improve your security. Protect your customers and your business will do well. It may cost more but it is worth it.
Cyber attacks evolve with the times and it is important businesses do stay ahead of the curve. It will have a knock-on effect on convenience and it will take a little longer, but the benefits outweigh the risks.
The single most important thing you can do today is look at integrating a decoding system into your server, which can decode all incoming encrypted information. This can sift through the information and determine whether any of it is malicious. It could save you millions. Hackers are getting smarter, but so too are businesses.
+Private Investigators UK +Private Investigations
#Encrypting, #Malware, #Netflix, #Amazon, #Hacked, #Encrypted, #hack, #encrypted, #encryption, #Skype, #Facebook, #Twitter, #LinkedIn, #SSL, #HTTPS, #HTTP, #Google, #Facebook,#TransportLayerSecurity, #AdvancedEncryptionStandard, #AES
#Wired #AshleyMadison #a10networks #ponemon #security https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blowfish_(cipher) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twofish
https://www.1stcalldetectives.com/…/2017-02-17-encrypting-m…
#Encrypting, #Malware, #Netflix, #Amazon, #Hacked, #Encrypted, #hack, #encrypted, #encryption, #Skype, #Facebook, #Twitter, #LinkedIn, #SSL, #HTTPS, #HTTP, #Google, #Facebook,#TransportLayerSecurity, #AdvancedEncryptionStandard, #AES
#Wired #AshleyMadison #a10networks #ponemon #security https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blowfish_(cipher) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twofish
https://www.1stcalldetectives.com/…/2017-02-17-encrypting-m…

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The NSA and the invasion of privacy

 many people experience the feeling that they are being watched, which can cause discomfort and severe distress. Such people are often told that they are being paranoid and that those who do nothing wrong have nothing to fear. However, the recent NSA revelations have shown that we are all victims of spying all the time, on a scale few people can even comprehend. For those of us who are discomfited by this knowledge, it is valuable to learn the extent of the surveillance, how it impacts on us and how it can be avoided to the greatest extent possible. 

The NSA leaks tell the story of a dramatic invasion of the privacy of ordinary citizens. Even if the state believes that someone is planning to commit a crime or has been involved in illegal activity in the past, unless the authorities can establish wrongdoing using legal methods, security officers should not be entitled to intrude on the citizen’s right to privacy. However, what the revelations regarding GCHQ indicate is that in the UK, every citizen is treated as guilty until proven innocent. 
GCHQ internet surveillance is largely dependent on data interceptors placed on the fibre optic cables that transfer internet signals in and out of the country. This information is between servers, so it can often be gathered without the complicity of large internet providers – although it’s important to be wary of them too. Up to ten gigabits of information can be gathered every second and is searched by GCHQ, the NSA and potentially others, for triggers or suspicious content. 

Edward Snowden released this information because he believed that the threat to the world’s citizens was too great to be kept secret. The internet is at the heart of many of our lives. It’s where we work, find information, contact friends and associates, and where other people record our information. The internet has now become a panopticon, in which every piece of information transmitted is potentially being read by unfriendly eyes. 

If you are concerned about the issues of spying and privacy or you fear that your professional or personal activities may be impacted by state spying, counter-surveillance may be a good option. Information is power when it comes to internet privacy and +247Detectives can help you to discover the extent to which you are being watched and to create defensive barriers to block the government’s access to your information.

#NSA #privacy #GCHQ

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4 signs your phone has been bugged
One of the major outcomes of the Snowden revelations is that many of us are now thinking twice about what we say and do on our phones and online. Social media, blogs, emails, and phone calls have all been subject to surveillance by the NSA and GCHQ over last few years, and now many people are worried about the security of their devices. To give you peace of mind about your mobile or landline telephone, here's a list of four surefire signs that your phone has been bugged.

1. Slow to turn off

If your phone is slow to turn off or shutdown, then this is a sign that it could be bugged. When your device shuts down, the bug inside will usually shut down too, but will take considerably longer to do so. This can mean that your phone takes longer to shut down than normal, or that after shut down the back light remains on. Other similar signs are it being slow to start up, awake from sleep mode, or go into the lock screen.

2. Background noise on calls

Any kind of background noise on telephone calls, including clicks, white noise, or static, are telltale signs that your phone is bugged and could be subject to surveillance. Also look out for echoes on the line, noise from other phone calls, or generally unusual sounds. These noises are usually being made by the person or the equipment listening in to your calls. If you do hear any of these noises, and are experiencing the other issues in this list, then it's likely you're bugged.

3. Low battery, high temperature

Bugging and surveillance uses a lot of battery life, and makes your device work harder than usual - so high temperatures and low battery life are also signs of bugging or surveillance.

4. High data usage

A higher amount of data usage than usual is another sign of possible surveillance. When a person bugs your phone, they get access to all of it, and are even able to use your apps and internet services. Therefore if you are seeing more data or internet usage than usual, then this could be a sign that someone else is accessing your phone, and using it remotely.

#Security
#Bugging
#Bugged
https://www.247detectives.com/blog/2017-03-08-4-signs-your-phone-has-been-bugged

Internet users experiencing online security 'fatigue'
In the last two years, cyber attacks in the UK have proliferated, with the government revealing last year that up to two-thirds of big businesses in this country experienced some form of attempt to infiltrate their systems and steal data in the preceding 12 months. [http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-36239805]
Among the most notable cases include the November 2016 hacking of Tesco bank, where criminals made off with £2.5m from the current accounts of 9,000 customers and a compromise of the National Lottery’s system, which led operator Camelot to advise customers to change passwords. It seems that no industry is safe: Three Mobile, British Airways and Dropbox have all relinquished data to online criminals in the recent past.
In 2016, the government announced that it would spend £1.9bn over the next five years in an attempt to clamp down on cyber crime, but will this have any effect? A study conducted recently suggests not...
User fatigue
Despite the very evident threat, the increasing amount of advice being given to companies and the aforementioned government funding increase, attitudes need to change if businesses are to make any strides against cyber criminals. Many internet users are experiencing what experts call ‘user fatigue’, ignoring recommendations and continuing to practise ‘unsafe’ online browsing, according to research conducted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). [http://www.information-age.com/vpn-maintaining-corporate-p…/]
One example of user fatigue can be identified in the most basic of online security requirements: the password. With a login required for work accounts, email and online banking, as well as ‘less important’ sites such as for online shopping, surely it’s no wonder that advice to use a different password for every account is being ignored by users?
Research Mary Theofanos said: “Years ago, you had one password to keep up with at work. Now people are being asked to remember 25 or 30. We haven’t really thought about cyber security expanding and what it has done to people.”
In the study conducted by NIST [https://www.nist.gov/…/security-fatigue-can-cause-computer-…], many users deployed the same password across multiple sites, or used simple, easy to remember combinations of letters and numbers, such as ‘ABC123’ or ‘123456’.
One user interviewed by NIST voiced her frustration with the apparent need to jump through hoops just to access online accounts: “I get tired of remembering my username and passwords. I never remember the PIN numbers, there are too many things for me to remember. It is frustrating to have to remember this useless information.”
Another said: “It bothers me when I have to go through more additional security measures to access my things, or get locked out of my own account because I forgot as I accidentally typed in my password incorrectly.”
It’s clear that this frustration has led many to simply ignore expert advice on cyber security.
“If they can’t look after my information, why should I?”
Some of those canvassed had a laissez-faire attitude to the possibility of an attack, wondering what hackers could possibly gain from targeting them. Their view was that they didn’t know anyone else who had been hacked, so it was unlikely to happen to them.
Others believed that data safeguarding was up to the company they were registering their data with, rather than themselves.
Many questioned these institutions, citing the high-profile hacks experienced by banks such as Lloyds, Tesco and RBS as evidence that the biggest companies aren’t taking data protection seriously enough.
How can we overcome user fatigue?
The attitudes highlighted above reveal a worrying trend. With security breaches happening in greater volume than ever before, users cannot afford to be apathetic with personal or business data. But what can be done to avoid adding to the mountain of information and advice already available?
Some simple tips include:
• Protection software – across all devices - is a must to provide even the most basic level of security.
• Those with difficulty remembering multiple passwords should use a password manager, rather than writing them down or just using a single, easy-to-remember login.
• Businesses should educate their staff on security issues – this is especially important if employees work on their own devices or regularly access business accounts away from work.
However, NIST made the following recommendations based on their data:
• Reduce the number of security decisions which have to be made by an individual user
• Make actions simpler to achieve
• Design for consistent decision making whenever possible.
At 1st Call Detectives, we put your privacy and security on a pedestal, as can be seen with the encryption certificate we proudly display on our site. For more advice on how you can safeguard your data online, or to enquire about our other services, get in touch with us today.
#cybersecurity, #security, #intelligence #analysts, #dataleaks, #hacking, #smartwatch #intelligencegathering, #cyber #networksecurity, #socialhacker, #psychologicalmanipulation, #Socialengineering, #Smartphones, #geolocated,
#Russianhackers, #Hack, #Hacked
https://www.1stcalldetectives.com/…/2017-03-04-internet-use…
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-36239805
http://www.information-age.com/vpn-maintaining-corporate-pr
https://www.nist.gov/…/security-fatigue-can-cause-computer-…

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Are scientists close to identifying dark matter?

It's one of science's deepest mysteries - but could the quest to identify dark matter, that intangible stuff that makes up a quarter of the known universe, be reaching its conclusion? New research could bring us a step closer to finding the answer.

It was the astronomer Fritz Zwicky, pointing his telescope at the Coma galaxy cluster back in 1933, who first coined the phrase 'dark matter' to describe a theoretical, unidentified substance holding stars and galaxies together. Calculating the gravitational mass of the cluster, he found the value was at least 400 times more than their luminosity would suggest. He also noticed that the Coma galaxies moved much too fast than if they were held together by the gravitational pull of just the visible matter. Some other, extra mass must be holding it together, he reasoned.

Cornell University physicist Vera Rubin added weight to this idea in 1950, noting that bodies at the edge of the universe moved at the same speed as those at the centre, apparently defying Newton's laws. There must be something holding them together, she concluded, and that thing had to be dark matter.

Fast-forward to 1973 and Jeremiah Ostriker and Jim Peebles, physics professors at Princeton University, are drawing up a theoretical model of the universe in a pioneering computer simulation. Something is missing from the picture; there is more mass in the universe than their calculations accounted for. They know that adding considerably more matter to the model will generate the gravity needed to hold their model together. Sitting down at the computer, they work Zwicky's theory of dark matter into the equation, and the experiment proves to be a success.

Dark matter does not absorb or emit light or other electromagnetic waves, so discovering and identifying it has long proven to be a difficult task. Nonetheless, we have been able to measure its gravitational pull on celestial bodies. There is believed to be five times more of it than of regular matter.

The strongest evidence of dark matter to date has been picked up by NASA's Fermi satellite since 2009. This unexplained barrage of gamma rays emanating from the Milky Way has been suspected to hold our strongest chance of discovering the key to the mystery of dark matter. Later discoveries of a similar signal coming from dwarf galaxies added weight to the evidence of this gamma ray.

Now the findings of two independent studies, both at Cornell University, suggest that these signals may be made up of thousands of as-yet-undiscovered pulsars; the rotting, gyrating corpses of dead stars. If these studies are correct, there would appear to be many more pulsars out there in space than we were previously aware of.

Although inconclusive, these studies significantly reduce the plausibility of the theory that these gamma rays hold the true identity of dark matter. 

However, a further chapter is about to begin, as new data is expected to be released by the Fermi satellite soon, allowing physicists to refine their research - and so the interstellar detective story continues...

#darkmatter, #deepestmysteries, #darkmatter, #research, #FritzZwicky, #Coma #galaxycluster, #galaxies,#gravitational #mass, c#luster, #luminosity, Coma galaxies, gravitational, extra mass, Jeremiah #Ostriker, #JimPeebles, #PrincetonUniversity, Zwicky's theory of of dark matter
#Zwicky

http://www.247detectives.com/blog/2015-07-06-are-scientists-close-to-identifying-dark-matter

#Spouse
#Relationship
#Surveillance
#Affair
#Investigation

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Bruce Willis to star as a private investigator: reality versus Hollywood

Bruce Willis made his name on the screen (as opposed to his real first name, 'Walter') as an investigator in the eighties TV series Moonlighting, with Cybil Shepherd. Now, he's going back to those roots in a new untitled movie, and we can say with absolute certainty that anything you see the wise-cracking action hero do will bear no resemblance to real investigative work. 

The Hollywood Reporter (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/cannes-2015-bruce-willis-star-796104) reveals that the plot for the action comedy is about a Venice Beach private investigator, and starts with a missing dog. Yes, we could conceivably be involved in missing animal work, although missing persons are our normal beat. We could also investigate loan sharks, but we follow people from many lines of work through our matrimonial and other investigations. However, unlike on screen we are less likely to confront gang leaders, and angry Samoans are probably a bit out of our territory. 

Generally, anything you see on TV or in the movies is a caricature of our investigative work. Patience and observation are the two key traits required of a real investigator; spending days carefully and stealthily monitoring a subject, keeping in the background and waiting for the right moment to gather evidence. We don't think Bruce will be using the internet to track down the villains, and while it is a useful tool, our cases are never solved with a quick bit of Googling and an incriminating social media post. We only wish it was that easy. 

While fiction and reality may seem to be merging, especially in the light of the Snowden revelations, increasing use of drone surveillance, phone hacking scandals, and the increasingly draconian security laws, investigators still rely on the basics. That might include a good zoom lens, cross-checking many stories and looking for strange patterns of behaviour in our targets.
 
So, if you are in a position where you need our services, please put aside the image of the private detective on the screen. Be assured that our reputation for professionalism is key to our success and to win new clients, so getting into bar fights, shoot outs, and goofing around while on the job are not part of reality. Also, investigators are not above the law, so won't bend it to achieve a result.


http://www.247detectives.com/blog/2015-06-23-bruce-willis-to-star-as-a-private-investigator-reality-versus-hollywood

#BruceWillis, #privateinvestigator, #Hollywood, #Investigator, #Moonlighting, #CybilShepherd, #comedy, #VeniceBeach, #loansharks, #matrimonial, #investigations, #investigative, #Googling, #incriminating, #socialmedia, #Snowden, #dronesurveillance, #phonehackingscandal

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Bruce Willis to star as a private investigator: reality versus Hollywood

#BruceWillis made his name on the screen (as opposed to his real first name, 'Walter') as an investigator in the eighties TV series Moonlighting, with Cybil Shepherd. Now, he's going back to those roots in a new untitled movie, and we can say with absolute certainty that anything you see the wise-cracking action hero do will bear no resemblance to real investigative work. 

The Hollywood Reporter (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/cannes-2015-bruce-willis-star-796104) reveals that the plot for the action comedy is about a Venice Beach private investigator, and starts with a missing dog. Yes, we could conceivably be involved in missing animal work, although missing persons are our normal beat. We could also investigate loan sharks, but we follow people from many lines of work through our matrimonial and other investigations. However, unlike on screen we are less likely to confront gang leaders, and angry Samoans are probably a bit out of our territory. 

Generally, anything you see on TV or in the movies is a caricature of our investigative work. Patience and observation are the two key traits required of a real investigator; spending days carefully and stealthily monitoring a subject, keeping in the background and waiting for the right moment to gather evidence. We don't think Bruce will be using the internet to track down the villains, and while it is a useful tool, our cases are never solved with a quick bit of Googling and an incriminating social media post. We only wish it was that easy. 

While fiction and reality may seem to be merging, especially in the light of the Snowden revelations, increasing use of drone surveillance, phone hacking scandals, and the increasingly draconian security laws, investigators still rely on the basics. That might include a good zoom lens, cross-checking many stories and looking for strange patterns of behaviour in our targets.
 
So, if you are in a position where you need our services, please put aside the image of the private detective on the screen. Be assured that our reputation for professionalism is key to our success and to win new clients, so getting into bar fights, shoot outs, and goofing around while on the job are not part of reality. Also, investigators are not above the law, so won't bend it to achieve a result.


http://www.247detectives.com/blog/2015-06-23-bruce-willis-to-star-as-a-private-investigator-reality-versus-hollywood

#BruceWillis, #privateinvestigator, #Hollywood, #Investigator#Moonlighting, #CybilShepherd, #comedy, #VeniceBeach, #loansharks, #matrimonial, #investigations, #investigative#Googling, #incriminating, #socialmedia, #Snowden, #dronesurveillance, #phonehackingscandal
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