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Stargazers Nation™
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United we Stand ,, Divided we Fall
United we Stand ,, Divided we Fall

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Will the sky be clear enough to see the eclipse? This question was on the minds of many people attempting to view yesterday's solar eclipse. The path of total darkness crossed the mainland of the USA from coast to coast, from Oregon to South Carolina -- but a partial eclipse occurred above all of North America. Unfortunately, many locations saw predominantly clouds. One location that did not was a bank of Green River Lake, Wyoming. There, clouds blocked the Sun intermittantly up to one minute before totality. Parting clouds then moved far enough away to allow the center image of the featured composite sequence to be taken. This image shows the corona of the Sun extending out past the central dark Moon that blocks our familiar Sun. The surrounding images show the partial phases of the solar eclipse both before and after totality.

A Total Solar Eclipse over Wyoming
Image Credit & Copyright: Ben Cooper
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Sometimes, the sky mimics the ground. Taken in May 2017 from the Atacama Desert in Chile, the foreground of the featured image encompasses the dipping edge of the caldera of an extinct volcano. Poetically echoing the dip below is the arch of our Milky Way Galaxy above. Many famous icons dot this southern nighttime vista, including the center of our Milky Way Galaxy on the far left, the bright orange star Antares also on the left, the constellation of the Southern Cross near the top of the arch, and the red-glowing Gum Nebula on the far right. Just above the horizon and splitting two distant volcanic peaks near the image center is the Large Magellanic Cloud -- the largest satellite galaxy of the Milky Way.

Milky Way over Chilean Volcanoes
Image Credit & Copyright: Carlos Eduardo Fairbairn
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8/21/17
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"Rho Ophiuchi Region" - by Matt Dieterich ©.

Capturing objects outside our solar system is exciting! 17 minutes of exposure time reveals so much beyond what our human eye can see. The Rho Ophiuchi Region is home to three types of nebulae including emission, dark, and reflection. I used the @takahashiamerica FSQ-106EDX4 and EM200 with a Nikon D750 camera to capture 17 x 1 minute exposures to create this final image. I combined the 17 images using PixInsight and performed final adjustments in Photoshop.
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Chaos reigns in the Carina Nebula where massive stars form and die. Striking and detailed, this close-up of a portion of the famous nebula is a combination of light emitted by hydrogen (shown in red) and oxygen (shown in blue). Dramatic dark dust knots and complex features revealed are sculpted by the winds and radiation of Carina's massive and energetic stars. One iconic feature of the Carina Nebula is the dark V-shaped dust lane that occurs in the top half of the image. The Carina Nebula spans about 200 light years, lies about 7,500 light years distant, and is visible with binoculars toward the southern constellation of Carina. In a billion years after the dust settles -- or is destroyed, and the gas dissipates -- or gravitationally condenses, then only the stars will remain -- but not even the brightest ones.

Stars, Gas, and Dust Battle in the Carina Nebula
Image Credit & Copyright: Bastien Foucher
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The channel is dying, time to bring it back to life #Youtuber

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Our friend Matt Dieterich is competing for the Weather Channels image of the year contest, if you wish to support Matt then please vote up his image here - http://bit.ly/2vFFigj
You can vote once every 24 hours, so please set a reminder in your phone/laptop to vote again each day until the Sept. 1st deadline!
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Most galaxies don't have any rings -- why does this galaxy have two? To begin, the bright band near NGC 1512's center is a nuclear ring, a ring that surrounds the galaxy center and glows brightly with recently formed stars. Most stars and accompanying gas and dust, however, orbit the galactic center in a ring much further out -- here seen near the image edge. This ring is called, counter-intuitively, the inner ring. If you look closely, you will see this the inner ring connects ends of a diffuse central bar that runs horizontally across the galaxy. These ring structures are thought to be caused by NGC 1512's own asymmetries in a drawn-out process called secular evolution. The gravity of these galaxy asymmetries, including the bar of stars, cause gas and dust to fall from the inner ring to the nuclear ring, enhancing this ring's rate of star formation. Some spiral galaxies also have a third ring -- an outer ring that circles the galaxy even further out.

Spiral Galaxy NGC 1512: The Inner Ring
Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble Space Telescope
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ACME DAM, WESTMORLAND COUNTY, PA
Nikon D750, ISO 2000 F 3.5 20 Second Exposure

Credit and Copyright:
MD Schloer
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Next weekend the Perseid Meteor Shower reaches its maximum. Grains of icy rock will streak across the sky as they evaporate during entry into Earth's atmosphere. These grains were shed from Comet Swift-Tuttle. The Perseids result from the annual crossing of the Earth through Comet Swift-Tuttle's orbit, and are typically the most active meteor shower of the year. Although it is hard to predict the level of activity in any meteor shower, in a clear dark sky an observer might see a meteor a minute. This year's Perseids peak nearly a week after full Moon, and so some faint meteors will be lost to the lunar skyglow. Meteor showers in general are best be seen from a relaxing position, away from lights. Featured here is a meteor caught exploding during the 2015 Perseids above Austria next to the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy.

Milky Way and Exploding Meteor
Image Credit & Copyright: André van der Hoeven
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If there are other Worlds, there must be other saints and Gods, creators, other beliefs and traditions that would not be the same as that as on the Earth.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ye5tCdsjbYM
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